It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Spinal Cord Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 03-28-2012, 03:59 PM   #1
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 6
Peppercat HB User
Cervical Spine MRI - what does it mean? thanks!

My husband (repetitive factory work and a bad lift) had an MRI after being off work for a year - we just couldn't get any tests scheduled for quite some time - had his MRI recently. He is in constant pain and feels like there is a huge nail being driven into the nape of his neck, his arms can go numb or hot and swollen. He can't lift anything heavy, or do anything like sanding etc. without pain. I hope you can bear with me, I am going to post the MRI results. I am hoping someone experienced can help us understand what it means, thank-you.

Clinical History: C6-C7 foraminal steniois less so on right. Weakness of grip and strength bilateral arm.
Technique: Saggital T1W and T2W images of the cervical spine have been obtained, as well as axial ED T2W images.
Magnetic Resonance Image Findings:
No subluxation is seen.
No disc herniation or stenosis is noted at C2-C3 and C3-C4.

At C4-C5, moderate broad-based anterior endplate marginal osteophytes with diffuse disc bulging are noted. However, there is no disc herniation or stenosis.

At C5-C6, minor broad-based anterior and posterior endplate marginal ostoephytes with diffuse disc bulging (i.e. osteocartilaginous bars) are noted. There is encroachment of the canal, but no cord abutment or deformity is seen. There is moderate left foraminal stenosis due to encroachment by moderate marginal osteophytes at the left uncovertebral joint. Minor osteophytes are noted at the right uncovertebral joint with mild right foraminal stenosis.

At C6-C7, disc space narrowing and fatty endplate changes are noted. Minor anterior and moderate posterior endplate marginal osteophytes with diffuse disc bulging (i.e. osteocartilaginous bars) are noted. There is encroachment of the canada, but no cord abutment or deformity is seen. Marked osteophytes are noted at the left uncovertebral joint with marked left foraminal stenosis. Minor osteophytes are also noted at the right uncovertebral joint with mild right foraminal stenosis. No disc herniation or stenosis is noted at C7-T1.
The cervical cord is normal in size and configuration. Nor abnormal signal intensity is seen.

Interpretation: Endplate osteophytes with diffuse disc bulging (i.e. osteocartilagnious bars) at C5-C6 and C6-C7, osteophytosis at the uncovertebral joints at C5-C6 and C6-C7. Canal stenosis with no cord abutment or deformity and bilateral foraminal stenosis at C5-C6 and C6-C7 (moderate at C5-C6 and marked at C6-C7 on the left at both levels).

Thank you for your time.
Chris

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 03-28-2012, 06:24 PM   #2
Inactive
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: So Cal
Posts: 1,385
WebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB UserWebDozer HB User
Re: Cervical Spine MRI - what does it mean thanks

Well, he's got a lot going on, but what matters is not so much the VARIETY of structural abnormalities as their SEVERITY. As far as this goes, the ONLY thing that stands out to me is the "marked" left-side foraminal stenosis at C6-7. That is, the C7 nerve is being compressed as it leaves the spinal cord and heads off to the shoulder, arm and hand. This should affect ONLY THE LEFT SIDE, and markers would be symptoms in the smaller fingers, but not the larger fingers or thumb.

So what does the radiologist mean by "marked"? Usually, they go from "moderate" directly to "severe". So is this guy putting "marked" in between "moderate" and "severe", or is he substituting "marked" in place of "severe"? Either way, "marked" looks like something that should be addressed.

Regarding the neck pain, I just don't know if any of those structural abnormalities - even the bone spurs on the left C6-7 uncovertebral joint - could be the cause. It's entirely possible, but I can't say how likely.

As for arm symptoms, SOME could be caused by the C6-7 problem, but ONLY on the left side. So if his problems are bilateral, then either those problems are not rooted in the cervical spine, or the radiologist has missed or downplayed something.

As for what can be done... I think you need AT LEAST TWO opinions from spine surgeons. The C6-7 uncovertebral osteophytes can (I'm pretty sure) be taken care of by a relatively minor operation called a foraminotomy. Who knows, maybe that'll take care of most of the problems....

Please keep in mind that I'm just an interested amateur, and that my impressions should not substitute for the opinions of qualified professionals.

Last edited by WebDozer; 03-28-2012 at 06:27 PM.

 
The Following User Says Thank You to WebDozer For This Useful Post:
Peppercat (03-29-2012)
Old 03-29-2012, 04:19 AM   #3
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 6
Peppercat HB User
Re: Cervical Spine MRI - what does it mean thanks

Quote:
Originally Posted by WebDozer View Post
Well, he's got a lot going on, but what matters is not so much the VARIETY of structural abnormalities as their SEVERITY. As far as this goes, the ONLY thing that stands out to me is the "marked" left-side foraminal stenosis at C6-7. That is, the C7 nerve is being compressed as it leaves the spinal cord and heads off to the shoulder, arm and hand. This should affect ONLY THE LEFT SIDE, and markers would be symptoms in the smaller fingers, but not the larger fingers or thumb.

So what does the radiologist mean by "marked"? Usually, they go from "moderate" directly to "severe". So is this guy putting "marked" in between "moderate" and "severe", or is he substituting "marked" in place of "severe"? Either way, "marked" looks like something that should be addressed.

Regarding the neck pain, I just don't know if any of those structural abnormalities - even the bone spurs on the left C6-7 uncovertebral joint - could be the cause. It's entirely possible, but I can't say how likely.

As for arm symptoms, SOME could be caused by the C6-7 problem, but ONLY on the left side. So if his problems are bilateral, then either those problems are not rooted in the cervical spine, or the radiologist has missed or downplayed something.

As for what can be done... I think you need AT LEAST TWO opinions from spine surgeons. The C6-7 uncovertebral osteophytes can (I'm pretty sure) be taken care of by a relatively minor operation called a foraminotomy. Who knows, maybe that'll take care of most of the problems....

Please keep in mind that I'm just an interested amateur, and that my impressions should not substitute for the opinions of qualified professionals.

 
Old 03-29-2012, 04:29 AM   #4
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 6
Peppercat HB User
Re: Cervical Spine MRI - what does it mean thanks

Thank you Webdozer, I appreciate your thoughts. I wonder when they did the MRI, how far down the neck they go. He seems to have a lot of pain at the very base of the neck, I'm not sure where the cervical spine ends and joins the rest of the spine. When he rolls his left shoulder it makes this snapping sound - think an x-ray of his arm said something about crepitus and scapula. The nape of his neck is very painful, he says it feels like there's a large nail being driven into it. He ran a big grinding machine at work that had a pneumatic assist for opening the left door that was never hooked up from the time the machine came, so 2,600 opening and closings of that door per week - I think that's why the left side is worse.

Where the problem seems to be in diagnosis is that he's likely had the stenosis developing over a period of time, and then he had the trauma lift of the tool box. I'm trying to find scholarly articles also that confirm that trauma can cause or heighten the stenosis. Compensation cut him off after a few weeks; the workplace said his injury didn't match his job description....it's a real nightmare and no income for over a year now. Comp. says they believe it's a gradual onset injury.

If they think it's arthritis then they'll say everyone gets it - mind you this happened at 43 years of age, and no history of arthritis in the family. He can't work at this kind of heavy job any more.

Our family doctor didn't say much about the MRI and admitted he's not that great at reading them. I'm wondering if I should get the disc, report and try to find a spine specialist here near London, Ontario Canada. I'm also wondering if he needs an mri of his upper back/nape of neck area.

As you pointed out, the weakness/numbness is worse in the left arm and hand. This is a real ordeal, I appreciate your words.
Chris

 
Closed Thread




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added








TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



WebDozer (268), jennybyc (197), Realhousewife (42), kenzibenzi (33), NJ Ldy (32), SpineAZ (31), teteri66 (26), frenchfri1003 (21), ladybud (20), feelbad (18)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1180), MSJayhawk (1005), Apollo123 (905), Titchou (848), janewhite1 (823), Gabriel (759), ladybud (754), midwest1 (669), sammy64 (668), BlueSkies14 (607)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:02 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!