It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Thyroid Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 07-24-2006, 04:09 PM   #1
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 46
star9763 HB User
New to all this

Hi I was diagnosed being hypo a little over two months ago. My gyno was the one who found out I have it. I had all kinds of blood tests done because my mood swings were weird and so were my periods. It runs in my family my Grandmother who had hers removed my mom and my uncle all have it. I was started on .025 of levothyroxine and was having my blood drawn every three weeks. She called today with my recent test results and she wants to up it to .050 mg. There is alot of room for improvement she said. I have an appointment to see a endo on Aug 4th and I was wondering what to expect.I am looking forward to seeing him because when my gyno talks about my results she makes it sound greek. I just know my thyroid needs to be working correctly. If anyone can tell me what to expect from the endo I would be appreciative.
star

 
Old 07-24-2006, 06:30 PM   #2
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Gulfport MS USA
Posts: 26
patsycatsy HB User
Re: New to all this

Hi Star,
My mom's cardiologist found my hypothyroidism. I had seen somebody for the fatigue, somebody else for the headaches, somebody else for the bone pain - each doctor had an opinion, a prescription, and a plan for me to go see another specialist. I was a walking poster child for hypothyroidism, but not one of those doctors looked at the big picture, added up the symptoms, or even ran a BLOOD TEST !! (that still amazes me.) Well, anyway, after a couple years of feeling worse by the day, my blood pressure and heartbeat sort of dropped down to one notch above 'corpse' and I went to the cardio. He ran the blood test that caught the hypothyroidism. Finally. He got me on the initial dose of 25 mcg, three weeks later he upped it to 50, and then he booted me out the door. He was not a thyroid guy, he was a heart guy. He sent me to the thyroid guy, after he got me started on the Synthroid.

This is all that's happening to you now. Your gyno COULD run the TSH's and read the numbers and up the Synthroid dose accordingly - but she wants you to have the best and most qualified doctor for your problem - and so she is sending you to the specialist. The endocrynologist treats glandular disorders exclusively, the gyno....well, you know what she does exclusively.

When you meet him, he'll talk to you a bit about how you feel. About fatigue and menstrual problems and mood swings and sleeping too much. He will be interested in your family history of thyroid disease. He'll listen to your lungs and heart, have you say "aaaahhhh", and he'll palpitate your throat pretty thoroughly to see whether your thyroid is enlarged.

He may order another blood test right away to see how your TSH is responding to the 50 mcg, or he may wait a month or six weeks. The first few months, your bloodwork will be pretty frequent and he will very gradually raise your Synthroid strength as he lowers your TSH. This is a period of fine tuning, and your dose may go up or down just a little, a few times.

Between six months and a year, your TSH will stabilize between .3 and 3.0 and after that, it's just maintenance. He'll want bloodwork every four to six months to make sure the TSH is staying put, he'll want to see you annually so that he can feel your thyroid and give you a quick once-over, nothing invasive. You will start feeling better soon - probably about the next time he raises the Synthroid dose.

Tell him you feel like you've been trying to communicate in Greek with your gyno - he'll explain exactly what's happening and why. Here's a bonus: when he gets you up to speed, you'll lose weight!

I hope I've helped ease your mind a little. Feel better =^..^= PatsyCatsy

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 07-25-2006, 05:39 AM   #3
Senior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 188
LucyPearl HB User
Re: New to all this

Star....
Welcome to the boards! Sorry you're here because that means you're having a problem. Hopefully you can get some good information here to help guide you through this thyroid journey. I think Patsy has explained things pretty well about what an endo does generally. But I'm going to differ on a couple of things. Mind you, this is just my experience with Hypothyroid and endos and numbers. First, I hope Patsy's correct...I hope it will be just that simple for you to get your thyroid within range. Unfortunately, it CAN take a while...many times it's going to depend upon the doctor...weather or not he/she will look at the big picture i.e your Free T3 & Free T4 ALONG with your TSH or JUST YOUR TSH. Many times, endos only look at TSH levels. If they fall within the "normal" range, that's it...they're sending you out the door and on your way. THe "normal" ranges have changed, but not all endos realize that. Most ranges within normal are from 1-5.0. Now, the guidelines are slowly changing and the new "normal" is 1-3.0. I personally, find that when my thyroid is somewhere around 1-2, I'm feeling my very best. You didn't mention what your numbers are. Everyone is different. There's no guarantee that if your thyroid levels are stabalized around 3 - 3.0 that you'll be feeling o.k...you may be or you may be one of the people, like myself, who doesn't feel good until they're TSH is lower and their Frees are higher... I don't mean to sound pessimistic, but there's absolutely no way to know that you'll be feeling better when/if the doc raises your medication. You won't if it's still not enough medication. What works for one person won't necessarily work for another. It's definately a fine tuning process involved and can take a while. You sound young...that will probably be in your favor. If you're older like me (47) and pre-menopausal, look out! Now you're dealing with fluctuating estrogent hormones as well as thyroid hormones and sometimes you can't tell which hormone is making you crazier! I believe that being younger helps you deal with this better (it did for me) because in your 20's, our bodies are functioning optimally and usually everything is up at full throttle...where it's supposed to be.
Think positive and confidently, learn all you can about your thyroid and hypoT. The more you know, the better patient you'll be...an informed patient is a good patient! But also know that it CAN take a while to start to feel better again...there IS NO definate time frame because each one of us is different. Be patient but be persistent and don't be afraid to ask the doctor lots of questions about your meds, your thyroid disorder and your treatment. Hope this helps...good luck to you!

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Any idea what this is? A_Phobia_J Mental Health 4 07-08-2004 03:48 PM
Please Help Me With This Addiction! Creeky Addiction & Recovery 26 06-19-2004 09:55 AM
anyone else have this happen? (oops long) serialnovelist Herpes 5 04-07-2004 12:11 PM
Prostate problems? This is what I do.. groundhog Cancer: Prostate 0 02-25-2004 11:48 PM
Is this depression? (Please HELP!!!) TawnyToad Depression 7 02-17-2004 06:30 AM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:47 AM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.com™ All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!