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Old 08-09-2008, 08:51 AM   #1
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The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

I am so with the previous doctors I had ever seen that they did not test my antibodies for Hashi's. When did the test of antibodies, TG,TPO, begin common in the hospitals in the States/the world?

Thanks.

 
Old 08-09-2008, 09:14 AM   #2
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

I was tested for antibodies back in 1991 so I figure it's been pretty common here for at least that long. Back then the TPO was called antimicrosmol antibodies but it was basically the same test.

 
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Old 08-09-2008, 09:22 AM   #3
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

Quote:
Originally Posted by accessn12 View Post
I was tested for antibodies back in 1991 so I figure it's been pretty common here for at least that long. Back then the TPO was called antimicrosmol antibodies but it was basically the same test.
Thanks, accessn. Even if that test is very common, would all endo doctors be concious/responsable enough to have the potiential victims tested? I suspect it. I was tested for the thyroid hormone levels for many times, but not for antibodies which are essential for adequate diganosis and long-term follow up. ONLY the sufferers who become "part-time professionals" themselves could solve their health problems?

Last edited by cutejenny77; 08-09-2008 at 09:26 AM.

 
Old 08-10-2008, 03:35 AM   #4
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

The thing is the test isn't absolutely necessary or required in order to treat. If a patient is doing well with treatment, they could go their whole life without having the antibodies tested.

It is required if a diagnosis is in doubt or a patient is not responding to treatment. It's also kinda nice to be able to put a name to a disorder. The name hypothyroidism is often sufficient to cover treatment but Hashimoto's is a more specific name for the exact type of hypothyroidism a person has. The majority of hypo patients have hashis. The other thing it does is confirms the fact that you have an autoimmune disorder which potentially could be beneficial information for your children or other relatives who might experience a similar problem and also tells the patient that they need to be on the lookout for other autoimmune disorders cause one ai makes a person more susceptible to others. Autoimmune disorders have a tendency to run in families. But since autoimmune disorders cannot be prevented yet, the only thing that will do is possibly quicken a diagnosis for other members of your family.

It is not dereliction of duty not to test for them and still acceptable not to cause a lot of people do just fine without the test. I know. It stinks. But, one day we shall change the world.

I gather you aren't doing well with treatment?

 
Old 08-10-2008, 05:05 AM   #5
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

Quote:
Originally Posted by accessn12 View Post
The thing is the test isn't absolutely necessary or required in order to treat. If a patient is doing well with treatment, they could go their whole life without having the antibodies tested.

It is required if a diagnosis is in doubt or a patient is not responding to treatment. It's also kinda nice to be able to put a name to a disorder. The name hypothyroidism is often sufficient to cover treatment but Hashimoto's is a more specific name for the exact type of hypothyroidism a person has. The majority of hypo patients have hashis. The other thing it does is confirms the fact that you have an autoimmune disorder which potentially could be beneficial information for your children or other relatives who might experience a similar problem and also tells the patient that they need to be on the lookout for other autoimmune disorders cause one ai makes a person more susceptible to others. Autoimmune disorders have a tendency to run in families. But since autoimmune disorders cannot be prevented yet, the only thing that will do is possibly quicken a diagnosis for other members of your family.

It is not dereliction of duty not to test for them and still acceptable not to cause a lot of people do just fine without the test. I know. It stinks. But, one day we shall change the world.

I gather you aren't doing well with treatment?
Yeah, your comment is very true and neutral. But I think only the diagnosis of Hypothyroidism would not be sufficient to understand a lifelong therapy for Autoimmune diseases, right?

actually, the doctors did not give any treatment because they had no clue, doubted why a person could have the thyroid goiter but remained euthyroid at the same time, ended up with no clear diagnosis or misdiagnosed as Simple Thyroid Goiter. That was their big mistakes because when I found myself ill, the hypo has developped for many years, yet I still assumed that my thyroid was as "normal"/euthyroid as many years ago.

I have another question, you said that a Hashi's sufferer would be more susceptible to other A/I diseases, I am considering to test other antibodies (RF, ANA,SMA,SS-A) for other A/I diseases, such as Type I diabete, and Adhernal function. Do you think it is necessary? If the antibodies was really found in me, but the diseases have not been obvious yet now, would it become an unnecessary burden for the future?

Last edited by cutejenny77; 08-10-2008 at 05:07 AM.

 
Old 08-11-2008, 03:27 AM   #6
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

I can be very diplomatic. I don't like to jump in with both feet until I have the facts.

In your case, they probably shoulda been tested. In years gone by, before they realized that iodine was an important nutrient, euthyroid goiters were pretty common. Anyone who wasn't eating food from farms with iodine rich soil had one. When they started putting iodine in the salt and fortifying foods with it, the common, simple goiters became almost non-existent. That's here. I don't know about China.

In most cases, hypothyroidism is a sufficient diagnosis. I live in an isolated area where there is a very small gene pool. Almost every woman you meet is hypothyroid or has an immediate family member who is hypo. It's fascinating. Do they have any idea they have hashis? Nope. Are they suffering? Nope. They take their "thyroids" and are perfectly content. Normally you wouldn't hear about their thyroid. The reason I do is cause I own a store and people are constantly coming and going. I'm skinny as a rail and am often asked why. I tell em I'm hyperthyroid. They respond with an "Is that so? I didn't know there was such a thing. I've got low thyroid." I ask em if they have trouble with it and they say not as long as they take their thyroids.

You aren't going to hear things like that on this board. The people here are having problems.

As to the other antibody tests. Really not necessary. However, if you develop sugar problems, inflammatory arthritis, dry mouth, hemolytic anemia or difficulty finding a proper dose of thyroid medications, then the appropriate antibody test should be done. Right off the bat, without jerking around looking for another cause first. That's cause you would already know that you have a slightly increased chance of having another ai. It's not that if you have one that you will get another. It's just the chances are slightly higher.

Hey, don't feel too bad. Somewhere in one of my records, one of the many, many docs diagnosed euthyroid goiter too. I've been hyper for 49 years and just got my official diagnosis telling me exactly what I have last fall.

 
Old 08-11-2008, 05:32 AM   #7
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Wink Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

A comfort for me. Take care,

Oh, I have another question...Would the Hashi's sufferers have the antibodies of TPO, TG for life time and the levels remain the same?

 
Old 08-11-2008, 02:17 PM   #8
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

Nope. The levels can fluctuate. They can also disappear. They have no idea why. Yet. One day they will.

 
Old 08-12-2008, 10:51 PM   #9
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

If one day the antibodies disappear, the Hypothyroidism will be cured automatically?

 
Old 08-14-2008, 02:33 AM   #10
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Re: The test of antibodies for Hashi's began in which year?

Not exactly. Now don't quote me on this figure cause I'd have to look it up again. It's something I read a while back. It was a study and they were talking about the percent of a given population who tested positive for TPOAb's and measurements of those antibodies over a long period of time. I was amazed at how high the number was but it was something like 10 - 20% of the people they were testing who'd tested positive, lost the antibodies. They did not extrapolate that information to say what happens then. All they were doing was measuring antibodies and reporting what they'd found.

Here's my guess. If no damage had been done that would cause a person to become hypo, then no damage would occur to make them become hypo. If a person had damage and became hypo before the antibodies disappear, then that damage is done and they will remain at the level of hypo they were at when the antibodies disappear. They are still hypo but no longer on a downward course.

Hashis is a destructive disease. The antibodies destroy the thyroid over time. In some people it is a very rapid process. In other's it takes years and years and years and some people never lose all thryoid function. Perhaps those are the ones who's antibodies disappear???

The researchers are working on trying to understand autoantibodies. Why does the body use it's defenses that are meant to protect us from outside invaders suddenly turn and start attacking one's own body? They just don't know. Yet. When they find out why, they will then figure out how to stop it. Right now, all they know is how to treat the symptoms. You were just unlucky to have been born at the wrong time to have hashis. But who knows? Maybe in your lifetime they will discover a cure.

 
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