It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Thyroid Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 02-01-2010, 10:10 PM   #1
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 23
kit456 HB User
At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Hello, All --
I've tested positive at low levels of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (the ones related to Hashimoto's, as I understand it) for about 10 years. Starting about a year ago, I went through a nasty bout of subacute thyroiditis that has hopefully resolved itself at this point (with me at a net gain of 15 pounds, unfortunately). At my last appt. in October, my endo said my anti-thyroglobulin antibodies were at 210 (normal range 0-35), but he didn't seem to be concerned about it. (At that time, my TSH was at about 3.5.) I haven't been back to the doc since, but I'm wondering: at what level (above normal) do these antibodies become a concern? If 210 isn't a concern, what number would raise a red flag? I still have symptoms (of the hypo variety), but with "normal" TSH, it seems that I'm "cured". Hmm...

Thanks in advance for your thoughts!

M

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 02-02-2010, 12:46 AM   #2
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 39
Lugrita HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Well, you have the numbers and symptoms of Hashimoto's, so I'm not sure why the doctor is waiting to treat you. Mine diagnosed me with the same antibodies at 123 (range 0-20) and a TSH in the mid-2's range, with Free T4 at .8. So your numbers should raise a big ol' red flag, I would think. I know how horrible I feel at these levels (my antibodies might be much higher now for all that I know - the only number I have is from over a year ago) so you're probably not feeling so great right now.

I would find a new doctor. It doesn't have to be an endo - my doctor isn't, and she's taking care of the problem.

 
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 02-02-2010, 04:28 PM   #3
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 23
kit456 HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Thanks, Lugrita!
Do you have any advice on finding a doc that will think outside of the box on thyroid issues? I've had a LOT of hypo symptoms for years (as well as the antibodies), but every doc I've ever seen has said that as long as my TSH is in the "normal" range, I'm not having a problem. Even when I went through the episode of subacute thyroiditis last year, as soon as my TSH hit in the normal range, I was suddenly OK (sure didn't FEEL OK, though!).

I'd appreciate any ideas you can think of to find an "out of the box" doc (in the Atlanta area). Thanks!

M

 
Old 02-03-2010, 10:14 PM   #4
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 39
Lugrita HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

I wish that I had ideas. I know that, out here (So Cal), it seems that you generally have better care in thyroid-related issues from a GP or nurse practitioner than you do from an endo. My numbers were whacky in three sets of labs over a 1-yr period before anybody seemed to notice or care (and I started feeling more and more horrible in the meantime). I didn't start to get anywhere at all until I collected all of my labs (from two different doctors) and brought them in to the nurse practitioner that I see. My ANA was high as well, and my pattern was speckled, and between the auto-immune results, the thyroid antibodies, and my TSH and free T4 numbers, it finally all made sense to her. But again, I had to bring it all in and just hand it over and hope that she would make the connection.

Honestly, in my case at least, I think that you would have far better care from a female doctor or NP. Male doctors did nothing for me, and just said things like, "Well, you turned 35 this year and your metabolism does slow down." Really? So I would gain 16 pounds in a couple of months while eating practically, exercising, and running around after four kids?!

I also heard the "you're a busy mom of 4, so that's why you're so tired", and they kept going back to the fact that I recently turned 35, as if that would cause my entire body to fall apart, my cycles to go completely whacky all of a sudden, my hair to fall out, my skin to dry up, my exhaustion, etc.

But when I went over my symptoms with a female NP, she listened so much better and really understood, because women know what is and isn't normal for women. My TSH is in the high-2's, but she said it was a red flag because it's on the high end (they go by a range of up to 3.0, so I was close to height of their lab ranges). I honestly thought that my TSH and free T4 were normal, but she said that they are not and are very clear indicators of hypothyroidism, particularly with the ANA and antibodies results which clearly show Hashimoto's. So all that to say that you might be better off finding a female doctor who actually knows and understands a woman's body, and who will listen to what you say about your symptoms. Your numbers are very clear, but for some reason male docs (in my experience, as I am sure there are wonderful ones out there) go by the numbers alone. My male Ob/gyn told me, in December, that I just need to exercise. I DO exercise, but he didn't believe that I do because I have gained 16 pounds. He didn't listen to anything that I said at all.

I'm sorry to ramble. I just want to encourage you to get your results in your hand, and see if you can find a female doctor, or even NP, that you can see and talk to. She may be able to take care of it completely, or at the very least she might be able to point you to someone who can and will. I hate doing that, as I hate bothering people and trying to insist that something is wrong. But I am at the point where it's almost unsafe for me to drive because I'm so exhausted, I feel like garbage all of the time, etc. and I was determined to bug someone into doing something so that I can feel better and serve my family better. I will pray for you, and I really hope that you find someone good, soon.

 
Old 02-04-2010, 08:23 AM   #5
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: AZ
Posts: 2,253
javelina HB Userjavelina HB Userjavelina HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

I would just add that any levels above normal range for TPO antibodies mean that you've got Hashi's and are therefore a concern (or should be) for a good medical practitioner. Hashi's is an autoimmune disease that, if untreated, will destroy your thyroid over time. The best way to treat is complete replacement of your thyorid hormones to the point where the thyroid shuts down and this will lessen or stop the antibody attacks. Just watching Hashi's, instead of treating, is like just watching someone have their leg chewed off.

I agree you need to find a doc or other practitioner who understands this and will treat you. Many have luck with naturopaths or alternative medicine docs, as well as NPs. It depends on how they've been trained and whether or not they are willing to think outside the box.

 
Old 02-04-2010, 01:32 PM   #6
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Rhode Island
Posts: 1,247
Bran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB UserBran'sNana HB User
Smile Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

I agree about the male doctor thing, I was just a lab sheet to the first endo. (male) they say stupid things to you too. I always had male docs my whole life ((ob/gyn,primary,chiro,a hemotologist) I started going to a nurse practioner for gyn and was like"so when are you going to do the pap smear?" "it's all done" she said!. That was when I knew I never wanted a man gyno or my primary doing pap tests! It was remarkable! Same thing with the chiro and endo. The hemo guy was nice though, very dedicated and easy to talk to, a lot of male docs aren't. I went to a nero doc a couple of years ago for a pinched nerve and he was very nice too... they say surgeons can operate but are cold. I guess it all depends but for ob/gyn and endo docs I say WOMAN.

 
Old 02-09-2010, 12:30 PM   #7
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: PINE CITY, MN, USA
Posts: 9
MUSTANGRITA HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

I totally understand. Here is my story. My tests for tsh, t4, t3 were all in the normal range and doc was thinking he was off on diagnosis, but he had did the antibodies. My tpo was >900,000 and the other was 346, and so was started on synthroid. After a year my levels for antibodies have dropped down but are still above the range. I still do not feel like I think I should, but have fallen on death ears-they simple don't seem to know what to do. With do some research I have found that some believe the tsh should be <2 to feel better.
What I would like to find out do you have issues with your hands-slight swelling of the palms along with them being red, there will also become really hot. I image be a super hero shooting heat beams from my palms. There is also a drooping eye lid that is only slightly so far.
I do agree that getting a doc to listen is very hard. Sometimes I feel they have made their mind up before entering the room.

 
Old 02-09-2010, 01:27 PM   #8
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 23
kit456 HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Thanks so much for your responses, Lugrita, Javelina, Bran'sNana, and MustangRita!!
It's so reassuring to to hear your stories and know that my "normal" results aren't really normal after all! I will definitely do some research on the alternative doc/NP front, which I agree is probably the best bet for getting someone to listen and treat outside the standard AMA guidelines. I went to an alternative doc here in ATL who I just loved, but can't afford to pay the hundreds of dollars for him to run all the tests outside my HMO.

It's funny that you all mentioned preferring female docs -- I've actually had just the opposite experience, at least as far as OB/GYNs are concerned. I had severe endometriosis for 20 years (I had six surgeries over that time to remove adhesions, huge ovarian cysts, blocked fallopian tubes, etc., before developing adenomyosis, requiring total hysterectomy); during my experiences with several OB/GYNs during my treatment, the female docs I saw (with a couple exceptions) were always the LEAST sympathetic of all. I wonder if you're a woman who doesn't have these problems, if you think in the back of your mind, "Well, I have a period/cramps every month, too, but you don't see me complaining about it!" At least with the men, they'll never have a period, so it will always be a mystery to them, and may prompt a little sympathy.

Mustangrita, to answer your question, I haven't noticed my palms swelling or red, although my feet/ankles do swell pretty regularly. It seems like everyone has a symptom or two that really stands out, but may be totally different from those with the same disease.

Thanks again, everyone, for your helpful responses!

M

 
Old 02-10-2010, 01:51 AM   #9
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 39
Lugrita HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

whoopeecat, my feet/ankles/calves have been swelling up for years and they have never figured out why (they are normally very skinny/bony when they aren't swollen, but when they do swell they will look like waterballoons and I'll have cankles, and pitting edema from my feet all the way up my calves that will last for sometimes months at a time without any relief...which makes it impossible to wear anything but super-loose flip-flops during those times). Is that related to the Hashimoto's? If so, I am wondering if this might be the first summer since who-knows-when that I might be able to have normal feet/ankles/legs since I will finally be on meds. Woo-hoo!

 
Old 02-16-2010, 10:02 PM   #10
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 23
kit456 HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Just one quick follow-up question for clarification: Is the presence of an abnormal level of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies alone enough to diagnose Hashimoto's, or is Hashimoto's only considered as a diagnosis when both antibodies and highTSH/lowT3/T4 appear? Could you ever have abnormally high levels of the anti-thyroglobulin antibodies and NOT have Hashimoto's?? So much to learn, and unfortunately, most docs don't seem too willing to share and educate...

Thanks, everyone!
M

 
Old 02-17-2010, 01:03 AM   #11
Facilitator
(female)
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Finland
Posts: 3,296
FinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB User
Re: At What Level Are Anti-Thyroglobulin Antibodies A Concern?

Hashi's is a disease that makes you hypoT - sometimes sooner, sometimes later. You can have some antibodies with no Hashi's but very high antibodies are a definate sign.

Last edited by FinnMaid; 02-17-2010 at 01:31 AM.

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
What makes the psa level in men go up or down ? Lazy Albert Cancer: Prostate 1 01-25-2009 02:47 PM
Low anti-body level in 3 yr old kellirlarson Blood and Blood Vessel 1 10-21-2008 06:30 PM
Does it make sense to increase meds with this level ?!! Kezzalou Thyroid Disorders 5 06-01-2007 09:54 AM
Serume level was 3000 now normal without treatment Sue Z Hormone Problems 6 10-26-2006 07:35 AM
Thyroid TSH Level Chintzy Thyroid Disorders 7 09-05-2006 08:42 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Sign Up Today!

Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

I want my free account

All times are GMT -7. The time now is 06:54 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.comô
Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.comô All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!