It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Thyroid Disorders Message Board
Post New Thread   Closed Thread
LinkBack Thread Tools
Old 09-25-2010, 10:37 AM   #1
Newbie
(female)
 
DaintyDane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Orlando FL USA
Posts: 6
DaintyDane HB User
What happens when you stop Synthroid?

What happens if/when you stop taking Synthroid? Wait! Please don't tell me that I shouldn't stop; the pharmacist already gave me that answer. I'm just wondering if for some reason one did stop taking it, what exactly happens? Do you just return to your pre-medicated state or do you have withdrawal symptoms like drug addicts or what? (A working class girl never knows when she may suddenly be so without funds that the basics of life are unattainable luxuries, hence I investigate all potential possibilities in advance of crises.) Thank you.

 
The Following User Says Thank You to DaintyDane For This Useful Post:
Drofdiagnostics (09-21-2012)
Old 09-25-2010, 10:47 PM   #2
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: new mexico
Posts: 1
kaivalia HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Please be careful. It depends on the severity of your condition but i stoped taking my synthroid because of severe side effects and because my endo wouldn't listen to me. I stared to feel like i was dying and nearly went into a coma. My blood pressure, pulse and body temp dropped to dangerous levels and i began to swell in my face and legs/feet. I had the most severe muscle pains i have ever experienced, crazy mood issues, became delirious...i could go on and on. I do have severe hypothyroidism, but anyhow just BE CAREFUL! Its not worth risking your life over and a lot of pharmacies have very inexpensive generic thyroxine( like $5 for a mo. supply)

 
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to kaivalia For This Useful Post:
midwestgirlne (10-15-2012)
Sponsors Lightbulb
   
Old 09-25-2010, 11:01 PM   #3
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: illinois
Posts: 47
arianne7 HB Userarianne7 HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Depends on your dosage...

 
Old 09-27-2010, 02:33 AM   #4
Newbie
(female)
 
DaintyDane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Orlando FL USA
Posts: 6
DaintyDane HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

It sounds like this stuff is addictive and perhaps I should never have taken the first pill. Currently on 50 because 25 was "too little" at last lab. May back down to 25 next week as the previous 50 was "too much". I've not shown any symptoms of hypothyroidism - ever. They started feeding me this stuff solely based on one lab when I went to the hospital in May because of a stomach ulcer, and instructed me to follow up with a doctor. The patient information that comes with the prescription says it doesn't have side effects, but from what I read here, it does. I refuse to ever get on that vicious merry-go-round of taking a pill, getting side effects, taking a pill for those...repeat repeat repeat until I've totally ruined my quality of life and/or poisoned myself completely. I have a lot more studying to do. I'd be happier with a supplement and/or dietary changes that "support" the thyroid instead, and contrary to mainstream belief I'm confident that it can be done.

 
Old 09-27-2010, 08:01 AM   #5
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,171
midwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

There's a lot about hypothyroidism and its treatment that you clearly don't understand. Synthroid is in no way "addictive" because it's a chemical twin of the substance that your thyroid gland makes itself. And it can be called a "supplement", not a "drug", because the pill you take supplements the shortage of hormone your gland can't produce. That's what it is.

The pharmacist was obligated to tell you to keep taking it because his professional ethic doesn't allow him to contradict his superior, the doctor. In truth, it's ok to stop taking a small dose that you've taken for only a short time. (Someone who has been taking a full therapeutic dose for years and years should taper off to avoid adrenal shock.)

If 25 mcgs of Synthroid is enough to satisfy your MD that your TSH is within "normal" range, your condition is probably not severe enough to need it too badly, unless you have many symptoms that make you want to take it. Be aware though, that irritability, negativity, and paranoia are common signs of hypothyroidism.

In the future, you may develop many signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism, because once you get it, it generally does NOT go away; it gets worse.

 
The Following User Says Thank You to midwest1 For This Useful Post:
Drofdiagnostics (09-21-2012)
Old 09-27-2010, 04:05 PM   #6
Newbie
(female)
 
DaintyDane's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Orlando FL USA
Posts: 6
DaintyDane HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Thank you Midwest1. I do have a lot to learn. I've started reading here, visited a couple of web sites (and they often have conflicting information) and need to visit the library. My emotions generally run quite reasonable in any given situation. But this event is really stressing me, especially running to the doctor every month for lab & a guess at dosage, hoping to hit the right one. My budget can't continue that. And I felt great before the hospital event, which wiped me out financially; looking at the bill in detail I realize a lot of expensive stuff was done in panicked defensive medicine mode that was without reasonable indication, so I was severely robbed. Sorry, off track. But it all contributes to stress, especially when you have to bear it alone.

 
Old 09-28-2010, 01:48 PM   #7
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA U.S.A.
Posts: 13
rabinowitz HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Although "addictive" is a bit of a charged term, I think what DaintyDane was concerned about was whether synthroid created a dependency (where you would be worse off than before if you stopped taking it). I think that's a totally legitimate question. Whether you want to use the terms "addictive", "drug", "supplement" or whatever, those are just words anyway and kind of beside the point. The question raised was completely valid and something I am concerned about as well.

I've been reading a lot about the danger of suppressing the thyroid's natural ability to produce hormones. This is partly why many doctors are afraid of medicating for borderline or subclinical cases. Also why narrowing the diagnostic range is so controversial too. It's a complex issue for sure. I myself am looking for some answers as I try to decide how to proceed with my own treatment.

 
Old 09-28-2010, 05:01 PM   #8
Senior Veteran
(female)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Missouri, USA
Posts: 12,171
midwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Quote:
Originally Posted by rabinowitz View Post
Although "addictive" is a bit of a charged term, I think what DaintyDane was concerned about was whether synthroid created a dependency (where you would be worse off than before if you stopped taking it). I think that's a totally legitimate question. Whether you want to use the terms "addictive", "drug", "supplement" or whatever, those are just words anyway and kind of beside the point. The question raised was completely valid and something I am concerned about as well.
Every word has a definition. I took the word "addictive" at face value, meaning what it's definition says: "Addiction -- the state of being given up to some habit or compulsion. strong physiological and psychological dependence on a drug or other agent"
Neither Synthroid nor any other thyroid replacement drug is addictive in the definitive sense. It isn't "habit" forming, does not create a "compulsion". There can be no "psychological dependence" involved. It's not a controlled, addictive, pharmacologic agent like morphine or Oxycodone. It's not addictive in any sense.... well, unless you want to split hairs and apply the phrase, "physiologically dependent". In that case, I have to agree that I am "physiologically dependent" on my thyroid med, because I don't have enough natural function left to serve my needs. If I didn't take it, I'd be one sick pup. A Type I diabetic is also "physiologically dependent" on the insulin she takes. But I'm guessing she'd rather be called an "insulin addict" than be dead.

The most common cause of hypothyroidism, Hashimoto's disease, causes gradual and sure destruction of thyroid gland tissue and of the process that converts iodine to thyroid hormone. This is why Hashi's patients who try taking kelp instead of thyroid hormone don't have a lot of luck with it. The ailing gland cannot produce hormone no matter how much iodine you feed it. Hashi's is "natural thyroid suppression" to the extreme. There's no cure for it. It never reverses itself. Once symptoms start, the damage done to the gland is severe enough that there can be no regeneration. The only remedy is to replace the natural hormone with that from a pill. In treatment, it's much easier to slowly and gradually work up to a full replacement dose than to try adding a little exogenous hormone to the little the gland is still producing. This method does turn off the remainder of the natural function the gland has left; but allowing the gland to continue sputtering out dribs, drabs, and occasional gushes of hormone when it feels like it generally produces multiple vexing symptoms while all that "natural" flux is going on. The body wants a steady supply of hormone to use when it needs it, just as it would get if the gland was functioning normally. If that hormone comes from a pill, the body couldn't care less.

If "turning off natural function" was all that bad, thyroidectomy for cancer or constrictive goiters would never be performed. Babies born without thyroid glands would be doomed to an early death. Because giving these people thyroid hormone in the right amount restores them to normal life and lifespans, what basis is there to say that a Hashi's-hypo victim must somehow find a way to muddle through in misery until that gland has dried up into oblivion?

If you would decide to stop taking replacement hormone after a short time, you would revert to the state you were in before you took it. But, you could well be be "worse off", not because you began taking and then stopped the hormone; but only because the antibodies would have continued to destroy thyroid tissue in the interim.

The subject isn't controversial because it's complicated. On the contrary, it's because MDs are taught that thyroid treatment is simplicity itself. They are taught that the TSH test is the gold standard... That it tells absolutely everything there is to know about thyroid status. This could not be more wrong-headed. They're taught that exogenous thyroid hormone eats bone and is dangerous to the heart. Also a fallacy. While it's true that the excess of hormone seen in natural, untreated hyperthyroidism is most definitely dangerous, a lower-dose, short trial of exogenous thyroid hormone given to a "subclinical" hypo person is not dangerous. Some progressive endos (including the one who diagnosed me) say that when there are antibodies and symptoms present, no matter the TSH level, treating sooner than later can alleviate symptoms and prevent goiter and nodule growth. Why would such a position even be debatable?

 
Old 09-28-2010, 10:43 PM   #9
Junior Member
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: Los Angeles, CA U.S.A.
Posts: 13
rabinowitz HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

Thanks for your reponse midwest 1.

I think I understand the point you are making and largely sympathize with it. However, I still don't see it as that black and white. The human organism is an incredibly complex system, and while replacing certain deficient hormones may be a great benefit to many people, it would be foolish to assume that it is entirely without risk (other than overmedicating to a hyperthyroid state). If suppression of endogenous thyroid output (among other things) is a possible risk, then it would make sense to approach medication with some amount of prudence. There has to be some gray area where it's not clear if the benefits outweigh the risks. For example, people with some reported symptoms of hypothyroid but with little or no lab results to back it up would definitely be in a gray area, don't you think? And wouldn't you agree that while there are doctors who won't treat for any but the most severe cases, there are also practitioners who might give out thyroid medication to anyone who is feeling a little fat, puffy and depressed? Hopefully most doctors fall somewhere in between these two, but where exactly is the right balance found? That is where it gets complicated.

I myself have had many hypo symptoms for 20 years (some debilitating). I recently had a test with a TSH result of 3.5, Free T4 in the lower 16%, and Free T3 in the lower 10%. If I accept the old reference ranges, then I should be okay. If I go with the new reference range, then I'm definitely in the gray area. Should I be treated? I would do anything to get rid of my symptoms, but I'm concerned that my case isn't clear-cut enough. That's what I'm trying to figure out now. Is the risk of suppressing my own thyroid production (which I've read about numerous times in articles by holistic practitioners as well as more traditionally oriented doctors) something I should be concerned about? If lab results are more clear-cut, I don't think it would be an issue, but the truth is that many hypothyroid symptoms are also symptoms of other conditions. Even low thyroid itself can be a temporary symptom of other conditions. We all want the answer and a quick solution to our ailments, but we need to be wary too. The instinct to explore the risk of dependency is a good one I think. It's a way of caring for ourselves, as much as seeking medical attention is.

I will probably give desiccated thyroid a shot, because I'm that desperate, but I don't know if I'm making the right decision. That's why I'm trying to learn more.

 
Old 09-29-2010, 03:39 PM   #10
Newbie
(female)
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: United States
Posts: 4
shellie6000 HB User
Re: What happens when you stop Synthroid?

midwest1: i have seen many of your posts and would love for you to view my post today on my results? if you have a second....thank you so much!

daintydane: i have gone off my thyroid meds for a bit because of my perscription and cost of going back to the doctor, etc....my doctor told me that a few days aren't going to "upset" anything in my system overall. i have not found levoxyl or armour to be in any way addictive. just my experience. good luck to you!

 
Closed Thread

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Board Replies Last Post
Newbie with Iron Deficiency Lab Values today, what now? AnnHilary Anemia 20 02-23-2011 02:42 PM
what happens when you take synthroid with food goody23 Thyroid Disorders 4 11-18-2008 01:20 PM
What happens when you take calcium and magnesium with synthroid? Debra Petteway Thyroid Disorders 7 08-09-2008 04:06 AM
What Happens Next chris7467 Thyroid Disorders 1 07-27-2008 09:28 PM
what happens when you dont take enough ml of synthroid jackie messers Thyroid Disorders 2 10-26-2007 12:59 PM




Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Join Our Newsletter

Stay healthy through tips curated by our health experts.

Whoops,

There was a problem adding your email Try again

Thank You

Your email has been added




Top 10 Drugs Discussed on this Board.
(Go to DrugTalk.com for complete list)
Armour
Cytomel
Levothroid
Levoxyl
Potassium
  Synthroid
Tapazole
Unithroid
Xanax
Zoloft




TOP THANKED CONTRIBUTORS



sammy64 (666), midwest1 (618), FinnMaid (302), Reece (220), lisa789 (196), Tree Frog (80), mkgbrook (72), cd37 (56), Bran'sNana (44), ladybud (41)

Site Wide Totals

teteri66 (1136), MSJayhawk (941), Apollo123 (856), janewhite1 (823), Titchou (770), Gabriel (743), ladybud (667), sammy64 (666), midwest1 (655), BlueSkies14 (610)



All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:34 PM.



Site owned and operated by HealthBoards.com™
Copyright and Terms of Use © 1998-2014 HealthBoards.com™ All rights reserved.
Do not copy or redistribute in any form!