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Old 07-02-2012, 09:03 PM   #1
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justjesi HB User
Hyperthyroidism. Overseas.

It's my first time posting here but I need somewhere to vent and for people to know what I'm going through. I was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism (Graves) two and a half years ago when I was 22. I was very unfit at the time and all of sudden started exercising a lot and with finals coming up I think it helped it trigger. I'm sorry if I don't exprese myself as well as others English is not my first language, I'm Argentinian though I'm currently living in Sydney. At the time I lost a lot of weight, people thought I had an eating disorder but truth is I was eating like a horse. My heart rate was over the roof, when I finished exercising my legs would tremble, it was winter at the time I'd go out wearing a sleeveless top and I almost fainted a couple of times when walking back home. I was forbidden to exercise my TSH was <0.01 uUI/ml my T3 90 ng/dl and my T4 480ng/dl. My heart rate was 100 beats a minute on rest. I was put on danantizol and beta bloquers until my heart rate was stabalised. I had monthy blood check ups, I never amanged to get my T3 and T4 to normal nevels but I got them highly reduced. I started exercising gradually and I gained weight.
A year ago I moved to Australia, my health insurance wouldn't cover pre-existent conditions so I started having check ups every trimester since I couldn't cover it. I was told I had to stop my medication after 2 years and if my thyroid didn't go back to normal functioning I'd have to use radioactive iodum or go to surger and become hypo...is that true? My health insurance ran out but fortunately I started a new job that will cover it, I haven't had it checked in two months and I stopped taking my meds. I hope they'll put me back on different meds because I really want to keep my thyroid. Also, I stopped exercising because the last time I had this awful itchy rash on my neck while working out and when I checked my heart rate monitor (which is an awesome tool btw) I was 120 beats per minute at rest. My period is stable and I don't show any other symptoms other than tachycardia.
I was wondering is it possible to stay on meds or do you have to get rid of your thyroid at certain point in your life if the condition is not reversed? If I were in Argentina I'd have become hypo by now. I'm gaining weight, more than I'd like to, at the minute but I rather not put my body into risk and wait 'til I see my doctor this week.

I'm glad I found this community no one ever knows what I'm talking about when I say I have hyperthyroidism and some people I know are hypo, I think it's more common?

 
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:18 PM   #2
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Helene48 HB User
Re: Hyperthyroidism. Overseas.

Hello, dear. Sorry about your problem. I was diagnosed with Graves 1 year ago and I have been on Methimazole (Tapazole) and Propranolol ever since. I, too, lost weight at first but gained a lot of weight as soon as I started taking drugs. It is disheartening, I know...

I had never been overweight before. I don't think your training triggered your condition but maybe it is the stress related to it that did. My doctor just allowed me to go to the gym and try loosing weight since my thyroid levels have been stable for the last couple of months. She also lowered my dose of meds. For what I know, there is no rule that says that after 2 years on drugs without a remission you have to kill off you thyroid with radioactive iodium. However, I realized that it is much simpler for doctors to do so and hook you on synthroids for the rest of your life and they will put a lot of pressure on you to comply. The thing is hyperthyroidism is a symptom of an underlying problem that most of the time is linked to your immune system. The cause is not your thyroid, so why should we have to loose it?

There are natural solutions to restore your health but they take a long time to work and require a lot of commitment. It is safer to start a natural protocole only once your condition has stabilized, I think. Hyperthyroidism can be more dangerous than hypothyroidism, so be careful if you want to keep your thyroid intact and always check with a doctor. You will have to change your diet and lifestyle, that's for sure. That's what I am trying to do right now and I hope to succeed. If I were you, I would try to find a doctor that is open to the fact that you want to keep your thyroid and are looking for natural solutions. Good luck!

 
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Old 07-02-2012, 10:24 PM   #3
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Helene48 HB User
Re: Hyperthyroidism. Overseas.

Hello, dear. Sorry about your problem. I was diagnosed with Graves 1 year ago and I have been on Methimazole (Tapazole) and Propranolol ever since. I, too, lost weight at first but then gained a lot of weight as soon as I started taking prescribed drugs. It's disheartening, I know... I had never been overweight before.

I don't think your training triggered your condition but maybe it is the stress related to it that did. My doctor just allowed me to go to the gym and try loosing weight since my thyroid levels have been stable for the last couple of months. She also lowered my dose of meds. For what I know, there is no rule that says that after 2 years on drugs without a remission you have to kill off you thyroid with radioactive iodium.

However, I realized that it's much simpler for doctors to nuke your thyroid and hook you on synthroids for the rest of your life than to look for a real solution. The thing is hyperthyroidism is a symptom of an underlying problem that most of the time is linked to your immune system. The cause is not your thyroid, so why should we have to loose it? The approach taken by most doctors is completely illogical.

There are natural solutions to restore your health but they take a long time to work and require a lot of commitment. It is safer to start a natural protocole only once your condition has stabilized, I think. Hyperthyroidism can be more dangerous than hypothyroidism, so be careful if you want to keep your thyroid intact and always check with a doctor. You will have to change your diet and lifestyle, that's for sure. That's what I am trying to do right now and I hope to succeed. If I were you, I would try to find a doctor that is open to the fact that you want to keep your thyroid and are looking for natural solutions. Good luck!

 
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Old 07-03-2012, 06:07 AM   #4
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Re: Hyperthyroidism. Overseas.

Welcome!

Sorry for the reason you're here but, glad you found us.

Helene48 has a wonderful understanding of Graves' (sorry, though, to hear of yet another member in the Graves' club).

It's entirely possible to join the 88% of Graves' patients that go into remission after taking anti-thyroid drugs until their bodies indicate remission is imminent vs. some arbitrary timeframe set by a doctor.

You might be interested to read "Graves' Disease - A Practical Guide" - it's a bit on the expensive side but has much of the latest-greatest info about Graves'.

The author of the book also wrote an online (free) course about Graves'/hyperthyroidism called "Hyperthyroid Disorders".

In there, you will learn about the right way to be medicated for Graves' (taking the lowest possible dose that will maintain the FreeT4 level in the upper half/upper third of the range, regardless of TSH).

There's a section about alternative treatments and general guidelines to help you achieve wellness.

One of the best things you can do for yourself is to make sure your doctor runs the right labs (FreeT4 and TSH at a minimum with FreeT3 being very helpful as well). You'll also want to maintain hard copies of your lab results and learn how to interpret them (it's easy and we'll gladly show you how).

This way, you can make sure your doctor is medicating you properly and, with appropriate diet and lifestyle changes, you can ease yourself into remission.
__________________
Graves' 2007...remission 2009....hypo 2010

 
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