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ktnap 10-06-2012 03:19 PM

Gluten-intolerance?
 
I've recently been seeing more and more references to gluten possibly causing problems with thyroid function. I would be more than willing to try going without it, but I can't seem to find any comprehensive resources to help me.

What is gluten? How do I know if a food I'm eating has it? Are there any resources I could check out of the library?

kmarie19 10-06-2012 04:27 PM

Re: Gluten-intolerance?
 
Hello,

I have recently commenced a gluten free diet as suggested by my doctor to help with hypothyroidism from Hashimoto's disease. I am feeling a lot better and will continue to improve as it takes a few months to get out of your system.

Gluten is in all wheat products. If you google 'gluten' or 'gluten free' you will come up with lots of information. There are recipes, information on reading product labels and lots of other tips about gluten online. Gluten free products are more accessable now but are a lot more expensive to buy. Some food in super markets is labeled 'gluten free' also some takeaway franchises list the food that does not contain gluten which is helpful.

I have lost weight and am feeling a lot better so if you have thyroid problems I would suggest you give it a go for a few months to see if you feel any improvement.

KitsMn 10-07-2012 06:09 AM

Re: Gluten-intolerance?
 
Gluten is in wheat, rye and barley. Oats doesn't have gluten but becomes cross-contaminated with wheat so you have to make sure the oats are labelled gluten-free.

My library has quite a few books on gluten (cookbooks as well). I'm reading one right now called The Gluten Connection. It connects a lot of autoimmune diseases with gluten not just hashi's.

I haven't gone completely gluten-free yet but I have cut way down. I have an enlarged thyroid where my neck swells up at times. I'm kind of experimenting with what causes it to swell. So far, it does seem to swell more when I eat more gluten.

ktnap 10-13-2012 04:04 PM

Re: Gluten-intolerance?
 
Any suggestions on how to do gluten-free? I cannot find any resources on it! Does it mean NO BREAD? How can I tell if something has gluten in it?

Any advice is welcome!!

midwest1 10-13-2012 11:28 PM

Re: Gluten-intolerance?
 
Not just bread... any food that contains wheat, barley, rye (and a few other lesser-known grains) or ingredients made from them. Here's a list for starters:
bagels, muffins, croissants, hamburger buns, scones, pizza, pasta, noodles, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, hot dogs, deli meats, any breaded foods including but not limited to chicken nuggets and fish sticks, and beer. Then there are the "hidden" gluten sources like malt flavoring within otherwise "safe" corn or oat breakfast cereals or hydrolyzed vegetable protein in soy sauce.

While you can pretty readily find gluten-free versions of many processed foods in the grocery store now, you'll find they're mostly low in fiber vital to blood sugar, weight, and cholesterol control and in nutrients that are essential to good health. They're often higher in sugar and calories, too, so weight gain is a real threat. The best gluten free foods are "whole" fresh foods, unadorned.

It's not an easy diet, and it's one that has only been [b]proven[/b] useful for those with celiac disease or genuine wheat sensitivity.

ktnap 10-16-2012 05:19 AM

Re: Gluten-intolerance?
 
[QUOTE=midwest1;5071929]Not just bread... any food that contains wheat, barley, rye (and a few other lesser-known grains) or ingredients made from them. Here's a list for starters:
bagels, muffins, croissants, hamburger buns, scones, pizza, pasta, noodles, cakes, pies, cookies, crackers, hot dogs, deli meats, any breaded foods including but not limited to chicken nuggets and fish sticks, and beer. Then there are the "hidden" gluten sources like malt flavoring within otherwise "safe" corn or oat breakfast cereals or hydrolyzed vegetable protein in soy sauce.

While you can pretty readily find gluten-free versions of many processed foods in the grocery store now, you'll find they're mostly low in fiber vital to blood sugar, weight, and cholesterol control and in nutrients that are essential to good health. They're often higher in sugar and calories, too, so weight gain is a real threat. The best gluten free foods are "whole" fresh foods, unadorned.

It's not an easy diet, and it's one that has only been [b]proven[/b] useful for those with celiac disease or genuine wheat sensitivity.[/QUOTE]

I've wondered about the fiber content. What does one do about that?


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