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Old 07-03-2013, 09:29 AM   #1
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newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

Hi, New to this forum. I was recently diagnosed as hypothyroid on 3/27/13 after visiting my PCP and feeling really lousy. I'd seen her once before in February and she told me that because I was a new Mom, that I was likely just experiencing regular symptoms that other new Mom's experience. (my son was born in September 2012, by the way). Anyway, she did a full panel and my TSH level came back at 202.6. She started me on .75 of thyroxine and saw me back 6 weeks later where she upped it to 100 because my TSH level was still at 14.12. I saw her again a couple weeks ago and the level was 4.1. which is obviously much better.

My question-should I have seen an endocrinologist in the first place? My PCP never recommended and I didn't know anything about endo's. A friend told me that my original TSH # was incredibly high and I probably should've been seen by an Endo for a full evaluation. Also, I still feel awful and I'm currently taking .112 mcg of Thyroxine. Thanks in advance.

 
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Old 07-04-2013, 11:02 PM   #2
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Re: newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

Those of us in the thyroid trenches have not generally had good endo experiences. They're diabetes specialists mostly, and they have archaic notions about thyroid disease and treatment. You're better off without one, probably.

Super-high TSH doesn't mean you're necessarily any sicker than someone with TSH of 5, or even 3. Even though MDs are taught differently, TSH just isn't that relevant. It's the free levels of T4 and T3 that are most important. Those are actual thyroid hormones; TSH is a pituitary one. The only thing your very high TSH indicates is that your pituitary gland works very, very well.

If you aren't making enough improvement with the course of treatment you're on, consider that the dose probably isn't yet your optimal one. Or, you might need some supplemental T3 to go with your thyroxine.

Wishing you well soon.
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:28 AM   #3
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Re: newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

Quote:
Originally Posted by midwest1 View Post
Those of us in the thyroid trenches have not generally had good endo experiences. They're diabetes specialists mostly, and they have archaic notions about thyroid disease and treatment. You're better off without one, probably.

Super-high TSH doesn't mean you're necessarily any sicker than someone with TSH of 5, or even 3. Even though MDs are taught differently, TSH just isn't that relevant. It's the free levels of T4 and T3 that are most important. Those are actual thyroid hormones; TSH is a pituitary one. The only thing your very high TSH indicates is that your pituitary gland works very, very well.

If you aren't making enough improvement with the course of treatment you're on, consider that the dose probably isn't yet your optimal one. Or, you might need some supplemental T3 to go with your thyroxine.


Wishing you well soon.
Thank you for the info. My T4 was originally <.4 where the "normal range" was .9-1.8. So T4 was low. T3 I've been reading isn't all that helpful in diagnosing hypothyroidism. My T3 # was in a normal range while TSH was vey high and T4 was low. I noticed with my most recent blood results that TSH is now 3.41 and my FT4 # has risen to 1.5 from 1.3.

 
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:47 AM   #4
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Re: newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

Hi Eastie, I have had hypothyroidism for the past 20 years and successfully treated it with Levoxyl (no longer available) and now Synthroid with no side effects; however, the key is to assure the dose is right for you. You will be given a dose then after 30 days another blood test should be run to make sure your levels are in line and then insist on having it checked every 6-8 months. I forgot to have it checked for over 6 months and my levels were completely off and I wondered why I couldn't sleep. Once you have the right level of thyroid medication you'll feel great with no side effects! Good lick!

 
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Old 07-05-2013, 07:49 AM   #5
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Re: newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

I meant good luck! Sorry can't type! And I would definately see an endo if at all possible. They are specialists and better at adjusting the level and also ordering the appropriate tests to monitor the gland to assure no nodules develop...

Last edited by Lacy Rider; 07-05-2013 at 07:51 AM.

 
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Old 07-05-2013, 08:49 AM   #6
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Re: newly diagnosed as Hypothyroid

Quote:
Originally Posted by Eastie156 View Post
T3 I've been reading isn't all that helpful in diagnosing hypothyroidism. My T3 # was in a normal range while TSH was vey high and T4 was low.
It's probably true that the T3 level is less useful for diagnosis, but that in no way means it's unimportant. It's a very useful guide to how well replacement is working. The theory is that T3 will correspondingly rise as T4 rises, but that's categorically untrue in every case. Some people have trouble converting enough T4 to T3 for their needs and therefore need to boost the T3 level with a prescription.

Many people find that replacement of T4 only does not give them the relief from their symptoms that they'd hoped.

T3 that's merely "in normal range" does not guarantee that level is your particular "normal". After all, your foot size likely falls within the "normal" standard range, but that doesn't mean you can comfortably wear any and all sizes within that range.
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