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TMJ Disorder -TemporoMandibular Joint Message Board
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Old 09-23-2003, 07:07 PM   #1
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Question TMJ surgery....Why is it performed???? Everyone Look at This Post Please!!

Why are TMJ surgerys performed? I mean for all of you out there who have had them why did you get them and what were your symptoms??? Maybe I should get it so I don't have to wear a splint??? Please respond!!

 
Old 09-23-2003, 08:19 PM   #2
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Hi:
I have not had surgery but this much I do know. Many of those who have had surgery still have to wear a splint. I certainly wouldn't have surgery simply to try to get rid of your splint.
Tiffany

 
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Old 09-23-2003, 08:48 PM   #3
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Hi,
Once again I don't have a splint but I was just wondering about the surgery. I mean what is the surgery for? I was just curious about WHY people get the surgery. Is it because they had a misplaced disk...or stuff like that. I was just a lil curious!!!

 
Old 09-25-2003, 05:36 AM   #4
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my understanding about surgery is that it should only be done in 5% of TMJD cases. it is reserved [at least it should be reserved] for the extremely severe cases.

now, im not sure what is classified as a severe case - i imagine someone who is completely locked.. im not sure, tho.

- saaraah.

 
Old 09-25-2003, 01:22 PM   #5
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Bren30 HB User
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I can't tell you why alot of people have surgery..

Only the reason I did it.I had a closed lock and a displaced disk that caused bone on bone rubbing and deteration of my jaw.They preformed Arthoplasty(21 months ago) on my right joint to pull the disk back in place .I wore a splint for almost two years before I did this. I went through countless Doctors, Dentist and lots of test over a 7 year period before I found a Oral Surgeon I trusted.

Not to get into all that.I have not regreted doing this..I may later but as of now..I'm glad I did it.
Remember....
Its not for everyone..chances of it being a cure all are very slim.Just keep an open mind about these treatments.( splints and medications).Before you turn to surgery..Once they open your joint it will never be the same.

Bren

 
Old 09-25-2003, 01:42 PM   #6
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I had TMJ surgery, because my jaw was locked open or closed at times. The pain was just awful to bare!! I tried all conservatived treatments, 3 arthroscopy surgeries and non of these theories relieved my pain and suffering..

I then heard of the Christensen Implants the Foss-Eminence Prosthesis,had them implanted bilateral Dec 1990. I am now without pain and eating everything, I'm very happy to be a success story with my implants!!

Best Wishes to all
Charlene

[This message has been edited by Charlene (edited 09-25-2003).]

 
Old 09-25-2003, 09:06 PM   #7
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I had surgery for a displaced disc. Two years later, I was closed down with scar tissue, another surgery.
Within two years I was closed down with more scar tissue. I fought against having another surgery until 1997. Third surgery,there was so much scar tissue wrapped around the disc, it all had to be removed. Implanted with the Christensen Fossa. The implant has never felt right, nor has it given me any relief. I have had several opinions and all agree it needs to be removed due to loose screws. My condyle is wore down to a stub due to metal against bone!! I have never been able to eat right and have lost 30 pounds. My opening is now 10mm which is less than two fingers. The implant was supposidly going to help with scar tissue. The oral surgeon said, "hmmmmm! I am doing these surgeries every week. I could have puked on the spot. How many are neccessary? Definitely not the answer for "just" a displaced disc!!! I have such puking headaches that sometimes I wonder if I will live to see the next one. I am a sad, sorry, Christensen reject!!!
Elaine

 
Old 09-26-2003, 05:07 PM   #8
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My surgery was for a vascularized disc, i.e., inflammed with blood vessels formed in it on the left side. They removed the disc and didn't initially replce it so I had bone on bone. Then came another operation to put in implants for an artificial disc. It only went downhill from there. I've had 25+ operations. Some of them for implants, one for a bilateral osteotomy where the jaw was broken on both sides and physically moved into a new position, a rib graft to replace an infected mandible, Christemsen prosthesis, Kent prosthesis--oh, the right disc was torn and it was repaired. I've always had pain on the right since but will never let anyone cut on it again. Because of the disease process on the left side I'm 100% disabled and have been since 1998--when I was 43. You have one operation and you risk a lifetime of scar tissue, nerve damage and probably no long term help for your symptoms. This is as honest and open as I've ever been about my feelings regarding surgery. I think it's harming the patient unless there is a true traumatic injury. I isn't likely to be a cure. Neither are splints according to the most recent studies. TMJ pain is terrible. And someday someone will find the right treatment. But right now, it just isn't out there for most people. Sorry for what must seem like a very negative reply, but it's one that is totally honest and could be a prediction of the future. Read some of Elaine and CymySue's posts.
I'm hoping you find an answer.
Donna Y.

 
Old 09-26-2003, 08:08 PM   #9
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Elaine & Donna,

Thanks to both of you for your continued posts regarding your personal experiences with TMJ surgeries - and for telling it like it REALLY is!! Even though I didn't have surgery for my TMJ condition, logic dictates that there would be more FAILURES than SUCCESSES with these types of surgeries.
"Cudos" to both of you!! http://www.healthboards.com/ubb/t_up.gif

Marlene

 
Old 09-26-2003, 10:02 PM   #10
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Sorry to hear all of your bad stories about surgery. Did you have the option to choose whether or not you wanted the surgery? Or did you have to do it because you were at wits ends?
Sorry to hear about your stories because they don't sound fun but they do sound painfull!
Ear~*

 
Old 09-27-2003, 02:03 PM   #11
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Elaine,
What did they do for the displaced disc the first time? I just realized that I've never ask you.
And the 2nd?
The Christensen in 97???? That was not offered to me.
(I have to say, I'm glad)

I had cartilage replacements in 92, they lasted 2 years.
I had a bilateral discectomy in 97, no replacements. I was told this was all that was available and worked the best.....

(I was always told that I had a lot of scar from previous surgeries that had to be removed. The last time,(2002) too much scar and damage to do any type of procedure.)
I am curious about the difference in our cases.

I had never made the connection with the "years" that we had these procedures leading to very different outcomes in 1997.

I guess you luck-up with "Which Wonderful Procedure" you get, according to your Surgeon.

I'm afraid you got the "Worst, of the Wonderful" in reference to our conditions.

Cymy Sue

[This message has been edited by Cymy Sue (edited 09-27-2003).]

 
Old 09-27-2003, 08:47 PM   #12
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Cymy Sue,
The first surgery,(1987) the disc was stitched back in place.
The second surgery,(1989) just removal of scar tissue as I had lost my opening, the doctor said the disc appeared to still be ok. The first two years after the second surgery wasn't too bad, I could still handle the pain. It never did go away after any surgery but it was tolerable. Like I said, I fought against another surgery, I refused to do it again. From 92 until 97 it was rough. I was a mess and I knew it. By the time I had surgery in 97 I was a real mess. There is a term for it, I don't know what it is called but my mandible was actually fused to my skull. My surgeon said I had the jaw of a 90 year old and he didn't know how I had functioned. Funny thing, is how many others have been told the same thing. I think I have heard it more than once on this board. Must be the phrase they quote, to make us feel better about having surgery, uggh! Anyway that is when I was implanted with the Christensen Fossa and things are downhill again. I have been told all the signs point to loose screws. Since I have no insurance, no one seems to care beyond my "loose screws". As far as I am concerned, I feel my joint is shot so I am in no hurry for the "next" surgery. I was told the next step is total joint replacement. As much damage that has been done with a partial, I really question a total??? Do they think I am totally nuts or just partially?
Basically I am not nuts but totally disgusted with it all!!!
Take care,
Elaine
PS.My opening is 10mm. I wonder if the fusing thing could be happening again but I am not sure what happens with metal in there. I am not too swift with these implants, I can't find any information on them other than the web site and it's "six" success stories.
Can a person fuse with an implant?????

 
Old 09-28-2003, 02:40 AM   #13
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It seems like being in different parts of the country in the late 80's determined the treatment or surgery we got.

In 1988, I had 2 Sagittal Splints (Orthognathic's) to cure my TMJD.
They didn't have a clue my disc were almost non-existant until 1989.

I was left with so much damage from the orthognathic procedures, I have no way of knowing what was causing so much pain. When they did MRI's & Tomo's and saw that my joints were a mess with almost no discernable disc, they started talking disc replacements with autogenous material. Shortly, after I had this done in 1992, they started seeing failures with this procedure.

I ask the Surgeon about the "90 year old statement" and how many he had seen or operated on. He said "one" live patient. He said the others he had seen were in cadaver research.

I was told after the first surgery, I had very small, thin and fragile bones. This was confirmed many times, by different Doctors/Surgeons. I also had a lot of bone loss.

I don't know what to tell you about a Total Prosthesis or another type of Implant.

More than one Surgeon has told me, I don't have enough good strong bone left to attach any of these devises too. They also told me that they would add to my pain and symtoms, due to prior surgical alterations and damage.

I have no way of knowing the extent of the damage you have. I can tell you in looking at my X-rays, Tomos and other images, it doesn't look like I have much of anything left, compared to when they started Surgically "Fixing" my TMJD.

I know you are still dealing with back problems and trying to get over your last back surgery, among other things. Maybe when you feel better, you could find someone who would tell you the truth about getting the loose implant out and "what" your condition would be without it.

You can live without disc and abnormal joint structure. (very little bone)
The muscles will compensate a great deal, but in doing so they become clenched and knotted.

A splint designed to support the joints and to let the muscles relax has helped me.

Our situations are very different and it might not work so well for everyone.

I hope you find the answers and help you need.

Cymy Sue

 
Old 09-29-2003, 03:14 PM   #14
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Hi this is cally22, and I just wanted to say that i had surgery because of an arteriorly displaced disk withot reduction, trismus, and closed lock,( I also have a malooclusion and other problems but those didn't factor into the two surgeries) I first had an arthroplasty in May of 2001. A year later I had to have a discectomy. Unfortunately I'm still in pain and having problems as of today. Though I would like to add that these problems are not quite as bad as they were before. I also wanted to say that prior to these surgeries i had tried everything. And i do ean everything. I had been on over thirty different medication,(muscle relaxants, anti-inflamatories , pain meds), I had steroid injections and botox directly in the joint, I had 3 bite splints, I had been sedated atleast 4 times and had my mouth pried open and manipulated to try to get it back in working order, you name it and the oral surgeons probably tried it...My suggestions for anyone looking into surgery is, get a second opinion, and be very sure of what you are doing, and what all the possible risks are. Good luck Cally22


 
Old 09-29-2003, 07:36 PM   #15
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My motto for anyone considering surgery is to expect the worst! If it doesn't happen, you won't be disappointed. Expect the worst but hope for the best.
A very complicated surgery that no one can predict the outcome and one that "no one is responsible" for the outcome. "Oh, it should have worked or it would have worked, had tmj been your only problem". I can't even begin to remember the list of excuses "why" it didn't work for me, or maybe I have blocked most of it out because I am totally sick of it and the doctors with their lame excuses. It is amazing how many doctors are actually "shying" away from this surgery. That should tell us something.
My husband is in construction so we travel a lot. Needless to say, I have seen so many different doctors in my travels. Most look at me like I am nuts when they find out I had tmj surgery. One pain management specialist told me that I should be sat in the waiting room with a sign saying, "Don't let this happen to you". Kind of ticked me off to say the least, because I knew she was right....
Elaine

 
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