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Posted by cragfoot on October 13, 2000 at 23:26:33:

In Reply to: Seaver's Disease posted by Hank on September 25, 2000 at 21:48:38:

: I was recently made aware that one of the young boys on our competitive soccer
: team was diagnosed with this disease. I felt rather bad since I was not aware of
: his condition until today. Unfortunately, I have yet to get an explanation of the
: ailment.

: Having searched the web for the last 45 minutes or so, I've become extremely
: disheartened that I'm never to know what Seaver's is.

: Considering the hour, and the time I've just spent getting nowhere, I would
: appreciate e-mail from anyone who can explain the causes, symptoms, and treat-
: ment.

: Thanks

Also known as a calcaneal apophysitis. "disease" is a little misleading. The calcaneus (heel bone)
has a growth area on the back of the heel, and on xrays it looks like almost 2 bones. When a person
is full grown the it is one complete bone. But where the 'growth area' separates the 2 aspects of bone
until it becomes one bone, sometimes gets inflammed . It is actually not uncommon in boys 10-12 years
old. It is something a person will literally outgrow. Usually it only bothers someone for 1 or 2 seasons.
The treatment is usually to just avoid running and jumping. In severe cases of inflammation, it may be necessary
to put a cast on .

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