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Re: helping my son

Re: helping my son

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Posted by Mr IQ. on August 26, 2000 at 13:26:01:

In Reply to: helping my son posted by kathys32 on August 22, 2000 at 14:27:55:

: My 9 year old son has had partial hearing loss since birth. He has had hearing aids for a few years, but his disorder is starting to worsen with age. I am worried that kids at school will start noticing his "disability". What can I do, as a parent, to prevent him from getting picked on?

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Hi there:

about myself: a 23 year old male with hearing loss who has just finsihed uni and got a prestigious job etc. and come from a single mother family. ANYWAY, the point i am making is that it depends on how ur son will handle life and whether he can cope with growing up through his teenage years and handle the problems associated with hearing loss.

I have memories of some bullying i had when was around 11+ till 17. Because i spent a lot of my time in the "Special needs" classroom from the age of 5 where the work is considerably easier and i was mixing with fellow people who has learning problems and hearing loss. But because i was flying through the work, the S.Needs Tutor decided to put me into mainstream at the age of 13. I had no social skills, and found the work VERY difficult to do. and this was an easy target for my normal hearing peers to pick on. Still i managed to catch up with my peers, and got my grades and went through college and then attended two different universities..... working alongside normal hearing students.

the point of my story is that if anyone is different to the 'norm', will definately get picked on anyway. But please do not try to put him in the Special needs classroom permenantly for the fear of him getting bullied. Because you will be cocooning (right word?) him from the outside world..... and he will definately suffer later in life due to a lack of social development with the normal hearing world.

Just try to give him BOTH worlds. For example, during the day he can interact with normal kids.... and then evenings at "deaf clubs" let him mix with other deaf children...... i never had that opportunity.

If there is anymore questions about this issue, please do not hesitate to ask, coz i have been through it and know exactly what ur son will be going through.

hope that helps (i have not proof read this message, my apologies in advance for any mistakes.)

adios.

Mr IQ.


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