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Re: Tingling in my head, face, and arms./DEBBIE

Re: Tingling in my head, face, and arms./DEBBIE

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Posted by lisa on October 05, 2000 at 14:21:02:

In Reply to: Re: Tingling in my head, face, and arms./DEBBIE posted by Debbie on August 14, 2000 at 18:33:44:

I too have had those creepy crawlers for about 15 years. I've also had burning pain along my nerve pathways, skin hypersensitivity, numbness, pins and needles, cognitive difficulties, weakness, fatigue, tremor, tripping, dropping things etc. I have 3 brain lesions that show signal intensity but my spinal fluid looks normal so far. We are waiting on the beta-cells. I'm neg for lupus, vasculitis etc. Seems like MS but my doctor still wants to do some other tests before he makes a final determination. He's the top guy according to the MS soc., so I guess its wait and see. I was a strong healthy body building female at 40. Now at 45 I can barely do anything. Don't wait to get diagnosed and treated. Just the dx can take months, in the meantime, its downward spiral. if anyone has any ideas for me, please let me know ASAP.

: : Thanks again!!! (no message)
: : :
: : : : Hi everybody. I have had those annoying tingling, creepy crawly sensations for about a year now. They seem to be in my head but my doctor says my brain doesn't feel so it must be on my scalp. Also it happens on my face and now arms. Since it is so annoying and I have been to the doctors and they did not help, I say it must be MS cause it actually helps me to handle the symptoms believing it is a very "bad" disease. Any kind words would be well appreciated and thank you.

: : : THESE ARE SOME OF THE SYMPTOMS OF MS. I DID NOT QUITE UNDERSTAND YOUR ENTIRE MESSAGE. I GUESS WHAT I'D LIKE TO KNOW IS, HAVE YOU BEEN GIVEN A POSITIVE DIAGNOSIS OF MS BY YOUR DOCTOR OR ARE YOU "YOURSELF" SPECULATING THAT THESE STRANGE SYMPTOMS ARE MS? THERE ARE MANY AUTOIMMUNE DISEASES THAT MIMIC MS. FIBROMYALGIA IS EXTREMELY CLOSE IN MIMICKING SEVERAL OF THE SAME SYMPTOMS AS MS.~~~~~TAKE CARE, BRANNAGAHN~~~~

: : : What Are the Symptoms?
: : : The initial symptoms of MS are most often:
: : : difficulty in walking;
: : : abnormal sensations such as numbness or "pins and needles"; and altered sensation: TINGLING, numbness (paraesthesia), or burning feeling in an area of the body.
: : Pain may be associated with MS, e.g. facial pain, (such as trigeminal neuralgia), and muscle pains.

: : : pain and loss of vision due to optic neuritis, an inflammation of the optic nerve.

: : : Less common initial symptoms may include:
: : : tremor;
: : : incoordination;
: : : slurred speech;

: : : sudden onset of paralysis, similar to a stroke; and a decline in cognitive function—the ability to think, reason, and remember.
: : : It is useful to divide the symptoms of MS into primary, secondary and tertiary categories.

: : : PRIMARY SYMPTOMS are a direct result of demyelination, the destruction of myelin—the fatty sheath that surrounds and insulates nerve fibers in the central nervous system. This impairs transmission of nerve impulses to muscles and other organs. The symptoms include weakness, numbness, tremor, loss of vision, pain, paralysis, loss of balance, and bladder and bowel dysfunction. Many of these symptoms can be managed effectively with medication, rehabilitation, and other medically-based methods.

: : : SECONDARY SYMPTOMS are complications that arise as a result of the primary symptoms. For example, bladder dysfunction can cause repeated urinary tract infections. Inactivity can result in disuse weakness (not related to demyelination), poor postural alignment and trunk control, muscle imbalances (adaptive shortening and/or stretch weakness), decreased bone density (increasing risk of fracture), and shallow, inefficient breathing. Paralysis can lead to the secondary symptom of bedsores. While secondary symptoms can be treated, the optimal goal is to avoid them by treating the primary symptoms.

: : : TERTIARY SYMPTOMS are the social, vocational and psychologic complications of the primary and secondary symptoms. A person who becomes unable to walk or drive may lose his or her livelihood. The strain of dealing with a chronic neurologic illness may disrupt personal relationships. Depression is frequently seen among people with MS. It may be a primary, secondary, or tertiary symptom. Professional assistance from psychologists, social workers, physical and occupational therapists, and public health agencies is indicated for managing many tertiary symptoms.
: : : It is important to remember that many of the symptoms of MS can be effectively managed, and complications avoided, with regular care by a neurologist and allied health professionals.
: : : RELATED TOPICS:
: : : BLADDER DYSFUNCTION
: : : BOWEL DYSFUNCTION
: : : COGNITIVE FUNCTION
: : : DEPRESSION
: : : DIZZINESS AND VERTIGO
: : : DYSPHAGIA
: : : EMOTIONAL ASPECTS
: : : FATIGUE
: : : GAIT
: : : HEADACHE
: : : HEARING
: : : ITCHING
: : : NUMBNESS
: : : PAIN
: : : SEIZURES
: : : SEXUALITY
: : : SPASTICITY
: : : SPEECH DISORDERS AND THERAPY
: : : TREMOR
: : : VISION
: : : OPTIC NEURITIS
: : : VISUAL SYMPTOMS





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