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Re: alternative treatment

Re: alternative treatment

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Posted by Deborah on August 14, 2000 at 00:25:15:

In Reply to: Re: alternative treatment posted by Tina on August 13, 2000 at 12:19:18:

: : so my tsh is 7.5 and my main complaints is anxiety, tension, moodiness. i havent started any synthroid yet cause i've read good and bad things about it. needless to say i am scared to death about all of this. also wondering about these other diseases one can get as a result from hypothroidism like graves, addisons, etc. i read only 25 % can get these, still it is scary. anyway to prevent them? what about alternative treatments, like herbs? anyone tried them with success. i was told primrose oil helps but can't find any evidence to back it up. what about kelp products or iodine? any ideans or suggestions would be so much appreciated. what about treating just the anxiety symptoms? what problems have others had with synthroid, what positive ones? sorry for asking so many questions but i am new at this thing. thanx tho.........harley

: Hi again Harley,

: First let me say that Snythroid will not harm you in anyway, so if your Doctor has asked you to start taking it, do so! Snythroid works for many people, just not all. My mother has taken it for 30 years with no problems and my Sister has taken it for 20 years. I'm the odd ball out in my family, perhaps because I have tested positive for the antibodies (though I was never given a definite dx of either Grave's or Hashimoto's) and I'm the only one that went hyperT with a hyper functioning nodule. I needed a natural thyroid to get relief from my major symptoms, which were many! But that doesn't say that you won't do well on it.

: Grave's is "usually" associated with Hyperthyroid, Hashimoto's is generally the autoimmune disease associated with Hypothyroid. I don't understand all the differences between them but there is usually eye (bulging) involvement with Grave's. Your Doctor can better explain why he/she is looking into Grave's rather than Hashimoto's since your TSH indicates hypo.

: Some people do have adrenal complications such as addison's, if you think you might ask your doc to run a test on your adrenal's, I believe it is easily treated with cortisone. It's advised to test adrenal function before trying to add a T3 drug or combo T4/T3 drug, which is something you will want to look into if after you get your TSH down to the new ideal of 1-2 and still don't feel well. So getting it tested now is a very good idea.
Hi Harley, I agree with Tina. Don't be afraid to take Synthroid. I have been taking it for @ 10 years. Ever since 1/2 of my thyroid was removed due to a suspicious nodule. It was rather scary at the time. Pathology report came back as Hashimoto's syndrome. Luckily, no cancer. The only time I had trouble was when I asked my doc to switch me to a generic drug because we no longer had insurance for Rx. I ended up spending more than I saved on additional tests, because thyroid levels did not stay consistent on the generic. At worst my heart was racing & doing flip flops & I was tired all the time from too much thyroid. Went back on synthroid & everything went back to normal. About kelp & iodine I agree with Tina. Stay away from it. I also use the non-iodived salt & if I eat too many chips or salty foods my skin breaks out real bad. Like being a teenager again. As long as I don't overdo the salt my skin stays good. It makes sense that since the synthroid pretty much turns my thyroid off & it is not collecting the iodine, the iodine has to go somewhere. Good Luck & God Bless! Deborah
: I have never tried Primrose oil so I can't give you my opinion on it but I did find some good information for you. This had fact sheets and other link in it.
: http://herbsforhealth.about.com/health/herbsforhealth/msubhot9.htm?terms=Primrose+Oil

: I do not advise using extra iodine or kelp! If you are in a country that adds iodine to it's salt you are getting enough iodine, maybe even too much. I've switched to a non-iodized salt but I still get more than enough any time I open a can of vegetables, any pre package food or eat at a restaurant. I find it absolutely amazing how much salt we can get in our diets without knowing it. I've even wondered if the reason salt effects our blood pressure might be because of the iodine in it? Would love to see that studied!
: Here is an excerpt from an interview with a holistic Doctor on it.

: Q. In your book, in addition to a variety of supplements, including Vitamin A, B Vitamins, C, E, and others, you suggest people get sufficient foods with iodine. There's been a great deal of controversy among holistic and complementary practitioners regarding whether to supplement with iodine or iodine-containing foods and herbs (such as seaweed, kelp, bladderwrack, etc.). A number of practitioners I've spoken feel that iodine can actually aggravate autoimmune thyroid disease. Personally, I've found this to be the case with me, and have heard from so many people who have had major "crashes" (in terms of fatigue, low energy, neck irritation/tenderness) when they either eat iodine-rich food, or begin iodine supplementation. What do you feel the situation is with iodine, and what are these reactions all about?

: A. I agree that iodine can aggravate autoimmune thyroid conditions. Iodine supplementation in those that have an autoimmune thyroid problem can be akin to pouring gas over a fire. However, with hypothyroid conditions that are not autoimmune in nature, iodine-containing foods can actually help the thyroid function better.

: To see the entire article
: http://thyroid.about.com/health/thyroid/library/weekly/aa071700a.htm

: Here is some more information on it from Mary Shomon's site.
: http://thyroid.about.com/health/thyroid/library/weekly/aa032400a.htm?terms=Iodine+and+Kelp#3

: This is just my opinion but I would try to get the thyroid problem treated properly before adding in medications for anxiety. But if you feel that you just can not make it though till then (it can take quite a while to feel any effects from thyroid hormones, give it a minimum of 6-8 weeks on Snythroid) something light and non addictive like Buspar might do, ask your Doctor. Just make sure that you look up the side effects and interactions of any drug before starting them.

: Sorry this is so long, just hope it helps a bit. Sincerely Tina




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