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Author Topic:   Identify Unkown Pill | Page views:
Shawn Hamby
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Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-13-2003 08:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Shawn Hamby     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I found a pill in my daughter's room. It has West-Ward 292 imprinted on it. Any idea of whtat this is. Should I be concerned.

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zuzu8
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From: California, U.S.A.
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posted 02-13-2003 10:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for zuzu8     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

If you still have the pill, I would take it to my pharmacist and ask him/her to identify it, which they can do very quickly for you, just by its name, color etc.

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anniNangst
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From: Kansas
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-14-2003 01:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for anniNangst     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The pill is methocarbimol(Robaxin) 750mg. It is a skeletal muscle relaxant. It is generally prescribed for relief of painful muscle spasms. Depression of the central nervous system can occur, causing drowsiness, dizziness, weakness and depression. It can be dangerous if a person is abusing it. I have a teenager and I am alarmed at the drug experimentation that is going on in his age group! He is open with me thank goodness, and tells me these things. The kids are taking anti-depressants, narcotic pain meds, cold preperations, whatever they can find in their parents drug cabinet, hoping to catch a buzz or mellow out. It is frightening, and I read that it is happening across the country.
I hope this helped.
**I keep all medications locked in my safe, including aspirin and Benadryl, there are too many teenagers around and I am not going to take the chance...**

------------------
If you do what you always did, you will get what you always got...

[This message has been edited by anniNangst (edited 02-14-2003).]

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zuzu8
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From: California, U.S.A.
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posted 02-14-2003 02:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for zuzu8     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Shawn Hamby:
I found a pill in my daughter's room. It has West-Ward 292 imprinted on it. Any idea of whtat this is. Should I be concerned.

I don't know your daughters age but it certainly seems appropriate for you to tell her you found this in her room, that your know what it is, and ask her what's going on, and that you are concerned.

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kynurse
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posted 02-23-2003 11:50 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would also be wanting to know who provided this medication to her.

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maisy
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From:louisville KY USA
Registered: Feb 2003

posted 02-25-2003 11:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for maisy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is the info I found on the pill. It is a muscle relaxant. Apparently the same strength is made by several different pharmaceutical companies. Description of med and warnings etc are below.

Imprint Code: WESTWARD292
Drug/Strength: Methocarbamol 750mg Robaxin -
Pronunciation: meth oh KAR ba mall
Brand: Robaxin, Robaxin-750


What is the most important information I should know about methocarbamol?
Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Methocarbamol may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.
Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking methocarbamol.
Call your doctor immediately if you experience a rash, itching, a fever, or nasal congestion during treatment with methocarbamol.


What is methocarbamol?
Methocarbamol is a muscle relaxant. It works by blocking nerve impulses (or pain sensations) that are sent to your brain.
Methocarbamol is used, along with rest and physical therapy, to treat injuries and other painful muscular conditions.
Methocarbamol is also used in the treatment of tetanus.
Methocarbamol may also be used for purposes other than those listed in this medication guide.


Who should not take methocarbamol?
Before taking methocarbamol, tell your doctor if you have kidney disease, liver disease, or a seizure disorder. You may need a lower dose or special monitoring during your therapy.
It is not known whether methocarbamol will harm an unborn baby. Do not take methocarbamol without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant.
It is also not known whether methocarbamol passes into breast milk. Do not take methocarbamol without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby.
Methocarbamol is not approved for use in children younger than 12 years of age.


How should I take methocarbamol?
Take methocarbamol exactly as directed by your doctor. If you do not understand these directions, ask your pharmacist, nurse, or doctor to explain them to you.
Take each dose with a full glass of water.
Methocarbamol is usually taken three or four times a day. Follow your doctor's instructions.
Store methocarbamol at room temperature away from moisture and heat.


What happens if I miss a dose?
Take the missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it is almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your next regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose of this medication.


What happens if I overdose?
Seek emergency medical attention.
Symptoms of a methocarbamol overdose include drowsiness, confusion, and unconsciousness.


What should I avoid while taking methocarbamol?
Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Methocarbamol may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities.
Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking methocarbamol.


What are the possible side effects of methocarbamol?
If you experience any of the following serious side effects, stop taking methocarbamol and seek emergency medical attention:
an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives);
a rash or itching;
a fever; or
nasal congestion.
Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take methocarbamol and talk to your doctor if you experience
drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, or fainting;
headache or blurred vision;
nausea or a metallic taste in your mouth; or
brown, black, or green urine (this is not harmful).
Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.


What other drugs will affect methocarbamol?
Many drugs can increase the effects of methocarbamol, which can lead to heavy sedation. Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you are taking any of the following medicines:
antihistamines such as brompheniramine (Dimetane, Bromfed, others), chlorpheniramine (Chlor-Trimeton, Teldrin, others), azatadine (Optimine), clemastine (Tavist), and many others;
narcotics (pain killers) such as meperidine (Demerol), morphine (MS Contin, MSIR, others), propoxyphene (Darvon, Darvocet), hydrocodone (Lorcet, Vicodin), oxycodone (Percocet, Percodan), fentanyl (Duragesic), and codeine (Fiorinal, Fioricet, Tylenol #3, others);
sedatives such as phenobarbital (Solfoton, Luminal), amobarbital (Amytal), and secobarbital (Seconal);
phenothiazines such as chlorpromazine (Thorazine), fluphenazine (Prolixin), mesoridazine (Serentil), perphenazine (Trilafon), prochlorperazine (Compazine), thioridazine (Mellaril), and trifluoperazine (Stelazine); or
antidepressants such as doxepin (Sinequan), imipramine (Tofranil), nortriptyline (Pamelor), fluoxetine (Prozac), paroxetine (Paxil), sertraline (Zoloft), phenelzine (Nardil), and tranylcypromine (Parnate).
Drugs other than those listed here may also interact with methocarbamol. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medicines.


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