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question about clock test


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Old 06-15-2013, 09:13 AM   #1
achs2323
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question about clock test

if failed once
is it ok to give it again ?

what if the person forgot the first time

and got it the second around ?

how does that work ??

or is it only valid for 1 time?

 
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Old 06-15-2013, 09:45 AM   #2
Arleeda
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Re: question about clock test

Usually the clock drawing is part of a short test given every time a patient visits a neurologist, if that is where this Mini Mental State Exam (MMSE) is being given. It is the only part of the test that my husband consistently fails although he is much better than he was the first time. After the first test, he took the trouble to learn the date and the mayor, governor of our location before the test. He never had a problem with repeating the words late in the exam. However, a longer 9 hr neuropsychological test that was "consistent with" vascular dementia was needed for the final diagnosis. His main problems are with executive function and visual problems, like eye hand co-ordination and depth of field. His gait is also unsteady and slow. Memory is actually not all that bad, but it is still a form of dementia.

 
Old 06-15-2013, 08:53 PM   #3
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Re: question about clock test

Arleeda has given you some good information. I will say that if the clock test is failed once, they will usually fail it repeatedly. Even if there is a high score on the MMSE many will fail the clock test. It measures executive function. Executive function is the umbrella term for cognitive processes that control and manage other cognitive functions. This seems to be the first indication of cognitive impairment. So yes, they can be given the test repeatedly and the likelihood of a different outcome is improbable.

In some, with very mild cognitive impairment they may get it the second go round but if repeated again later they are likely to fail. It is a complicated function to actually draw the clock, remember the time, and get the hands in the right place. Also remember that with cognitive impairment there are good days and not so good days. You have to take the worse day as your bench mark in diagnosis and hope for the good days

Love, deb

 
Old 06-16-2013, 08:19 AM   #4
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Re: question about clock test

I have a question about the clock test. I understand that some subjects become frustrated when they find they can't draw the clock and time. Are there subjects who cannot tell that their clock was not drawn correctly?.. like numbers not placed correctly or clock hands not positioned correctly?

 
Old 06-16-2013, 08:47 AM   #5
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Re: question about clock test

Luau, from my experience, some will realize it doesn't look the same but can't fix it and get frustration, while some will have no clue it is incorrect. Mom just scribbled some marks on a paper and went on to the next task. She seemed to have no awareness that there was anything wrong with what she did. This was in the late moderate/early advanced stages. A lot depends on the amount of decline in the executive function. Her last MMSE... there was not even a completed circle let alone numbers or hands where they should be

Love, deb

 
Old 06-16-2013, 12:11 PM   #6
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Re: question about clock test

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gabriel View Post
Luau, from my experience, some will realize it doesn't look the same but can't fix it and get frustration, while some will have no clue it is incorrect. Mom just scribbled some marks on a paper and went on to the next task. She seemed to have no awareness that there was anything wrong with what she did. This was in the late moderate/early advanced stages. A lot depends on the amount of decline in the executive function. Her last MMSE... there was not even a completed circle let alone numbers or hands where they should be

Love, deb
Deb, thanks. My question pertains more to early stages, when many tend to be in denial of their condition. You were saying that most do not recognize their "reality" isnot the same as our reality. So I was wondering if they even realize that their clocks are not drawn correctly.

 
Old 06-16-2013, 06:35 PM   #7
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Re: question about clock test

Luau, some will and some will not see anything wrong with what they have drawn. Some will notice and make excuses. Some will notice and get upset. Most will not notice. If they could see the difference, they would come closer to drawing the correct figure

When Mom was first diagnosed she had the clock test. It was incorrect, they pointed it out, and she made excuses. This was in her moderate stages. You do need to know that the early stages are defined as the stage where symptoms are not noticed. So by the time you see symptoms and initiate testing, most are in the moderate stage. That is why the clock test is so important. It test the executive function that can be impaired and we not see major symptoms. Executive function and behavioral changes are usually the first changes noticed and rarely attributed to dementia.

Love, deb

 
Old 07-18-2013, 11:53 AM   #8
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Re: question about clock test

My hubby failed the mini test..especially the clock. The neuro sent him for the full battery.....decided it was ????? due to english being his second language. He did not recognize that the clock he drew was so very wrong. Most days he seems OK...........though he seems to anger easily and seems to be stuck in a rut.
Not to sur of what to do.

 
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