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Koot
12-18-2003, 08:55 PM
I have a very close female friend who drinks 8 Coors Lite beers each weekday evening in a period of 5 hours time (starting at 5:30PM and stopping at 10:30PM to go to sleep). She will also drink around 10 beers on Saturday and another 10 on Sunday. She only weighs about 105 lbs.

I know that people who drink a lot on a regular basis don't get as high as someone who doesn't drink much but alcohol is alcohol and body weight is body weight... When I calculate her blood-alcohol percentage using 8 beers in 5 hours for 105 lbs I get a .28 blood/alcohol! That’s an extremely high B/A rating to have each and every night but she seems to be far less intoxicated than what I would think she should be. If the numbers don't lie, how can this possibly be? And what damage is she doing to herself?

I'm afraid she's going to ruin her health by drinking so much...especially her liver, but also her mind. She’s been doing this for about ten years or more. And she drinks alone in her house so it’s not like it’s a social habit with friends. She doesn’t necessarily hide the fact that she’s drinking so much but she does do some rather strange things like placing a full glass of beer in her bathroom cabinet out of view but readily available as she sits in bed to watch television. She also buys large amounts of beer at the grocery store as if she’s afraid she’ll run out. It’s nothing for her to have 50 to 100 cans of beer in the refrigerator and cupboard. She rarely starts drinking before late in the afternoon even though she could if she wanted to. She says she just likes the taste and it relaxes her!

So, does this mean she has a drinking habit? I would say “yes” but I’m not sure. Is she an alcoholic?

Davidps
12-18-2003, 09:52 PM
Koot,
AA puts out a pamphlet that contains 20 questions on whether a person may be an alcoholic. You probably could obtain it by calling AA in your local phone book. It basically centers around if drinking causes some problems in your life then you might consider it being a problem. Some of the questions are if the person has blackouts (can't remember drinking periods), medical problems, problems with employment and ability to maintain a job, relationship problems, etc. I can't remember them all and I'm not sure if all the above are included. But they all seem to center on whether alcohol creates a problem for you in your life. Hope this helps! Take care.
David

Koot
12-19-2003, 08:34 AM
I find that the amount of beer she drinks in a span of only 5 hours is amazing for her small size. Can someone please explain to me how a person can have a blood alcohol of .28 every single night before falling asleep but have no signs in the morning of a hangover?

lane7eir
12-19-2003, 08:49 AM
got me on the hangover thing. the big question is, once she starts drinking is she able to stop after only a few? when i was in college, i weighed 115 lbs and could easily put away a 12 pack a night. granted usually i would get sick or pass out at the end, but i repeated this cycle constantly. the only other question i would have is, is does your friend think she has a problem? it really doesn't matter if you think she does. god knows, my family and friends told me i was a lush and all i did was get po'ed and keep on until finally I saw what my life was becoming and was willing to make changes. :)

Koot
12-19-2003, 09:35 AM
I can't honestly say whether she's "able" to stop after only a few...because she always drinks at least 7 and up to 10 (most of the time she has 8) each night before falling asleep. She never gets sick (throws-up) but she does get argumentative and confrontational as the night moves on...along with an unsteadiness in her balance and that dizzy look in her eyes. But even that is not to the extreme like you would think after a 105 lb female drinks 8 beers in 5 hours and having such a high (.28) B/A. Am I mistaken that a .28 B/A is very close to passing out and a serious life-threatening level?

I think she knows she has a drinking problem but would deny it if confronted. To my knowledge only one person has mentioned it to her and she denied having a problem and got upset and perturbed at the person. She hides her drinking well simply because she doesn't come in contact with many other people when she does her drinking.

Banker
12-19-2003, 10:21 AM
I think the reason why she doesn't get really, really drunk and/or sick is because she's built up a pretty big tolerance to alchohol. For example, when I first started drinking I would get a buzz off of one drink. After I drank for a while (and I don't have a drinking problem.... just pills), probably years later then the more frequently you drink, the more you are able to drink and get the same feeling. I got to where I could have 5 beers and get the same affect as if I had one or two when I first started drinking so it's all about building up tolerance.

lane7eir
12-19-2003, 10:52 AM
koot-
i don't know a formula for calculating a BAC. but here in SC .08 is the threshold for DUI which in a 120 lb person is the equivilant of approximately 2 drinks.
anyway, your friend sounds like me. at the end, i preferred to drink at home. cheaper for one which was also how i rationalized that i wasn't a drunk. LOL! i think i also realized that if i went out, i knew deep down i would get falling down drunk and make a fool of myself. (i did do this with my co-workers not so long ago). the best advice i can give you is just to be there for your friend if whe wants or asks for help without enabling her in her addiction.

Koot
12-19-2003, 11:32 AM
Here is a link to the chart that I used to calculate the BAC: http://www.brad21.org/bac_charts.html

Koot
12-19-2003, 11:39 AM
I guess you're right about bulding up a tolerance...but the tolerance is so huge it's hard to believe yet there's no other way to look at it. She must have a huge tolerance. I'm just afraid her habit will get worse and she'll do damage to her body, which may already be happening.

Any thoughts on whether her habit will get continuously worse in the years to come? Also, drinking this much each and every day, do you think she's already done harm to her body (liver, mind, etc.)?

lane7eir
12-19-2003, 12:40 PM
of course her body will be damaged. fortunately for me, my liver panel came back functioning well. my dr told me for the amount of time i had been drinking (18 years) my liver was probably a little fatty, but abstinance will cause it to regenerate itself. however, prolonged abuse will lead to cirrhosis which in turn leads to liver failure as well as other organ damage. there are tons of medical sites for physical effects of alcohol abuse.
the mental anguish caused by this disease is unreal. alcoholism took over my life very quietly as i'm sure others on this board will testify to. i am not willing to die a miserable death of a drunk like my grandmother whom i can't even remember since she died when i was a toddler (i have only heard pieces of her story from my dad). i will probably never be able to make reparations for the hurt i have caused my family & friends, all i can do is ask their forgiveness. today i feel good about that. months ago, i would have hidden in a bottle of merlot.
i really hope your friend finds peace with herself this holiday season. who knows, maybe she will hit her bottom and decide to try to change her life.
;)

Koot
12-19-2003, 01:14 PM
Thanks... I hope she will too...but I have my doubts that will happen. It's a sad thing that is happening to her.................

of course her body will be damaged. prolonged abuse will lead to cirrhosis which in turn leads to liver failure as well as other organ damage. the mental anguish caused by this disease is unreal. alcoholism took over my life very quietly as i'm sure others on this board will testify to.

i really hope your friend finds peace with herself this holiday season. who knows, maybe she will hit her bottom and decide to try to change her life.
;)

Davidps
12-19-2003, 02:53 PM
Koot,
Alcoholism is a progressive disease that can only get worse if not treated. I watched my older brother die from cirrhosis at the age of 44 and it was not a pretty sight. His stomach area continued to bloat and at the end the liver could not even process pain medication from the damage. It's probably one of the many reasons that I haven't had a drink of alcohol in 13 years. I knew I did not want to die in the same way, but was headed in that direction. I hope your friend hits bottom real quick before the liver and other organs start to go, not to mention the mental and emotional anguish the disease creates. My prayers are with her and she is very fortunate to have a friend like you. You might want to consider an intervention where you have a meeting with all her family and friends and confront her about her problem. In many instances, I've seen it work! Take care. You are a rare friend and I hope she appreciates you!
David

openseason
12-21-2003, 12:37 PM
Koot: You only need one question to know if she is an alcoholic. Does she always drink to intoxication once she begins drinking? If yes then alcoholism, its that simple.

Koot
12-21-2003, 01:58 PM
No, I can't say that. When she is out at a function and is drinking she won't drink to the point of being intoxicated while at the function. Also, she will not begin drinking until late in the afternoon when at home...but she sure drinks alot every night (8 or 9 beers in 5 hours) every single night for a 105 lb female. And that amount, in such a short period of time, equates to a .28 BAC, which I find amazing to have every single day...day after day after day. I've never calculated it but it would be interesting to know what her BAC is the next morning after sleeping 8 hours. It still must be somewhat high...but I don't know.

Koot


Koot: You only need one question to know if she is an alcoholic. Does she always drink to intoxication once she begins drinking? If yes then alcoholism, its that simple.

openseason
12-21-2003, 05:34 PM
Koot you state that "you cant say that", but then you say she is a a BAC of .28 every day. She is intoxicated 4 times over at that point, even if she does not act intoxicated. She most certainly is an alcoholic un my opinion. However she will not realize it until she tries to stop drinking.

Koot
12-21-2003, 07:09 PM
You may be right that she is an alcoholic but somehow, someway, she seems to function normally every morning with no signs of still being intoxicated from the night before. A few times each year she will visit family that prevents her from being able to drink (at all) and she "seems" fine with it...not being agitated or craving alcohol.

Don't you agree that if a female who weighs 105 lbs drinks 8 beers in 5 hours time she should have a BAC of approximately .28? And 8 hours later (after sleeping) she still should have an elevated BAC the next morning, right?

Maybe you, or someone else, can explain how she's able to do this night after night and not have even the slightest signs the next morning of having a BAC of .28 the night before. That's really strange to me and I cannot explain it.

Koot

Davidps
12-21-2003, 10:37 PM
Open Season,
I don't agree with you that just because she drinks to intoxication, she is an alcoholic. The definition that I received was that if alcohol creates a problem in your life then you might be an alcoholic. I'm talking about a physical, mental, or emotional problem in one's life. In some cultures, alcohol is drank daily and yet alcoholism is rare in some of these cultures. Unless it is creating a problem in her life, I would not label her or anyone else an alcoholic. Plus, only she can decide if she has a drinking problem or is an alcoholic. I hope I don't offend you and if I have, I'm sorry. It's just my opinion. Take care!
David

openseason
12-22-2003, 07:08 AM
A person can be an alcoholic and not have problems caused by the alcohol. An alcoholic is someone who must have alcohol in order to function day by day. This woman we are discussing is an alcoholic. She is not a social drinker. She appears to be functioning normally because her body has a tolerance to the drug. However the alcohol is slowly destroying her brain, liver, kidneys, and heart. The alcoholic is the last one to know and realize they are an alcoholic. A .28 BAC per day is alcoholism, and the disease is progressing each day.

Koot
12-22-2003, 08:50 AM
There seems to be a difference of opinion on whether someone like my friend is indeed an alcoholic or not. Before I even think about the possibility of discussing this with her I certainly would like to know for sure.

openseason
12-22-2003, 10:59 AM
The amount of drinks itself does not determine alcoholism. However your friend is a daily drinker which shows addiction. To be truthful, you are in denial and are buying the line "shes just a heavy drinker". The truth is heavy drinkers are alcoholic drinkers. My family is filled with alcoholics and I know it when I see it. Especially the fact that the alcohol does not affect your friend much. That is a textbook sign of alcoholism, the ability to drink large amounts of alcohol without appearing intoxicated. As to confronting your friend she will deny her problem to the end of time.

Koot
12-22-2003, 11:22 AM
I'm not in denial about whether she's a "heavy drinker" or an "alcoholic". That's what I'm asking about and trying my best to find out! Sadly, I'm afraid you're right about the rest of what you said!

Banker
12-22-2003, 11:35 AM
I agree... I think she is what you would call a 'functioning alcoholic'. She can still work, have relationships, not have 'problems caused by the drinking' , etc but still drink almost a half of a case of beer every night... Just my humble opinion but I would definitely agree and say she is one. She IS doing damage to her body. Does she have any family or other friends that live near you guys? Have you discussed it with anyone else that knows her well?

Koot
12-22-2003, 02:08 PM
I can't see how she's not doing damage to her body with that much alcohol going into her body on a daily basis.

No, she doesn't have any immediate family living close by her. And no, I haven't discussed it with her or anyone else...except for making the comment one time that she always has an awful amount of beer in the house for one person. One time I counted over 100 cans in the refrigerator and under the counter. Most of the time she has between 59 cans and about 80 cans. (I know the refrigerator can-racks in the door holds 59 cans and that is always full...re-filled as she takes out cold ones from the refrigerator.)

I still don't see how such a small woman in her mid-50s can manage that much beer! She has a petite body, no "beer gut" whatsoever and you would never know it unless you saw her late into her drinking pattern at night before she goes to sleep.


I agree... I think she is what you would call a 'functioning alcoholic'. She can still work, have relationships, not have 'problems caused by the drinking' , etc but still drink almost a half of a case of beer every night... Just my humble opinion but I would definitely agree and say she is one. She IS doing damage to her body. Does she have any family or other friends that live near you guys? Have you discussed it with anyone else that knows her well?

stormy79
12-22-2003, 05:24 PM
koot,
only SHE can say if she is an alcoholic or not. step one is "admitted we were powerless over alcohol and that our lives had become unmanageable." only she can answer that question. I am an alcoholic and i could do 13 shots of southern comfort and 8 beers and walk talk and not have a hangover the next day...for ME that was a good indication that i did not process alcohol like a normal person. i was 5'6 140 lbs and i could drink large men under the table. i drank a gallon of wine a night in 5 hours at the end of my drinking career 12 years ago. i mostly drank at home alone and wouldn't know if i was argumentative because there was noone to argue with. i would get on the phone and yack with people...butr not fight. i am very hyper and i have ADD and drinking slowed me down...helped me sleep..it;s a terrible thing to not sleep.
you could ask your friend about her drinking...you risk losing her. if you are worried about her, it may be worth it to hand her the pamphlet the other gentlmen mentioned. she has to want to change tho...
good luck.
stormy

openseason
12-22-2003, 06:48 PM
A doctor or counselor can diagnose alcoholism in a person if the person answers the alcoholism evaluation questions truthfully. Most alcoholics never admit to their addiction. You really are off when you say only "she knows if she is an alcoholic". With 80 cans of beer in the refrigerator for herself, she is most definitely an alcoholic.

I do agree that only she can decide to stop drinking.

The vast majority of alcoholics never stop drinking.

A person may admit they like the taste of beer. They may also like mountain spring water. But no one has ever sat down and drank a case of mountain spring water. However there are millions of people who do sit down and drink a case of beer each day. It is the first beer which triggers the allergy addiction to the alcohol.

Banker
12-22-2003, 07:10 PM
Openseason - What is an 'allergy addiction'? I've never heard of that? Thanks for filling me in, I'm fairly new to this addict talk :-)

stormy79
12-23-2003, 03:42 AM
in AA only the alcoholic can admit to being an alcoholic. we do not label anyone. i was speaking from what i was taught, to speak of my experiences, not to accuse or condemn. the AA program has been tested and is true. people who use the 12 steps and attend meetings have expereinced a daily respite from drinking. that's how we do it. one day at a time. if someone had called me an alcoholic before i was ready to admit it, i would have jumped down their throat with both feet and would have been turned off from the program. it is a program of honesty with ourselves. thus the first step: "WE admitted we were powerless over alcohol, that our lives had become unmanageable." when this lady admits this to herself, then she will be able to get they help she needs. not all of us admit it, not all of us recover. some are jailed, institutionalized and some of us die from the disease of alcoholism. of all the people i started with 12 years ago in my close knit group? 5 are dead including my husband, and several more have serious health problems resulting from their years of drinking.
stormy

openseason
12-23-2003, 05:13 AM
Stormy since alcoholism is a disease it diagnosed by its symptoms. Based on what this woman drinks per day I can safely say she is an alcoholic. What she is consuming is far beyond social drinking. What I am answereing has nothing to do with AA. You are talking about the "stigma" connected with addiction.

The other question is what is an "allergy addiction"? People often crave things that are allergic. One of the first founders of AA regognized that alcoholics were alllergic to alcohol. Once they took a drink they could not stop until they were intoxicated. They have a complete loss of control and drink fast and drink a lot of alcohol. They are not social drinkers. Ten percent of alcoholic drinkers consume 80 percent of the alcohol sold overall. So you can see that a small percentage become extemely addicted and kill themselves and others in the progression of the disease. An alcoholic affects those people around them in a negative way.

#1Texan
12-23-2003, 06:21 AM
I have only read this last page, and I see Mr. Openseason with his black and white replies.

I will read the whole thread and then give my opinion.


#1Texan

openseason
12-23-2003, 08:08 AM
You are correct Texan. A person is either an alcoholic or not. It is often compared to being pregnant, there are no degrees of pregnancy.

stormy79
12-23-2003, 12:58 PM
i was replying in the light of koot worried and wanting to help this lady...i was replying more spiritually than scientifically....i was taught to NOT assume someone was an alcoholic...read the big book. some people are just heavy drinkers...if you go by science, NONE of us would recover. we crossed that line and it is only thru divine intervention, prayer and meditation and working the 12 steps that I stay sober one day at a time. i am not a doctor, nor a scientist, but i AM an alcoholic and i believe i can speak from experience on this subject...God keeps me sober. i had people say to me "could you just have one drink and walk away?" my answer was yes!....am i still an alcoholic? people didn't even know i drank...i never appeared drunk to them. it was ALL very controlled and they tried to convince me that i didn't need to go to AA. i know in my heart that i lost the power at some point to choose whether i was going to drink or not that day...that's when i handed it over to the Man upstairs...it was a matter of 10 days of drinking every night whether i wanted to or not. I couldn't NOT go to the liquor store and buy a bottle of wine...that was powerlessness...and in turn making my life unmanageable...
what i DO know is that lady drinking that much every night is not good for her. that is just common sense. that she may be escaping? that is for her to say. you can add and subtract and calculate this lady's blood alcohol level, but if this lady will only stop if she wants to...that is my non-scientific AA view. i hope it helped someone today.
stormy

Davidps
12-23-2003, 01:27 PM
Stormy,
:wave: I really appreciated your message. It kind of says it all as for recovering from a seemingless hopeless state of mind and body called alcoholism is concerned. Without spiritual help it is too much for us. I know that I would have died a long time ago had it not been for AA and a power greater than myself whom I choose to call God. Thank you for your message of encouragement! We are also told in AA that alcoholism is but a symptom of the underlying problem. That's why there are 11 other steps to deal with the problem of living and maintaining a sober life. Only the first step mentions the word "alcohol." Take care!
David :wave:

stormy79
12-23-2003, 02:11 PM
thanks david....
stormy

openseason
12-24-2003, 07:15 AM
Not every heavy drinker is an alcoholic, there may be one or two heavy drinkers that are not alcoholic, thats true, but all alcoholics are heavy drinkers. The point is a distinction without a difference. The woman we are discussing has a problem and only she can choose to quit drinking.

#1Texan
12-24-2003, 10:08 AM
HOLY COW PADDY OPEN!
Where do you come up with this stuff??

"but all alcoholics are heavy drinkers"



KOOT: laney , Stormy, David and Banker have given you lots of correct info.

#1 your friend has to decide whether or not she has a problem.
#2 you can't do anything to help her.


Take care

#1Texan

Koot
12-24-2003, 12:45 PM
If I confront her and ask her if she thinks she has a problem I believe she'll deny that she has a problem and then our friendship will probably become strained. But the #2 (you can't do anything to help her) is what really bothers me! There doesn't appear to be any reason for me to get involved....

Koot


HOLY COW PADDY OPEN!
Where do you come up with this stuff??

"but all alcoholics are heavy drinkers"



KOOT: laney , Stormy, David and Banker have given you lots of correct info.

#1 your friend has to decide whether or not she has a problem.
#2 you can't do anything to help her.


Take care

#1Texan

#1Texan
12-24-2003, 01:08 PM
Koot
Absolutley if you confront her it will strain the relationship. She doesn't believe she has a problem, she might, she might not, she will have to hit bottom in order to possibly see that her drinking is causing problems.

You can't help her, it is that simple, until she sees that she is causing problems at home or work or in relationships or she hits the bottom you cannot make her stop drinking, or go to AA or detox or anything else.

You can't bribe or cajole or beg or cry her into not drinking, ultimatums don't work either.

Alcoholics ( if she is one) have a mind of there own and in most cases are stubborn to the fact that their drinking is not a problem.

I have lived with alcoholism all my life, I am 43 years old, first my father, then a husband for 18 years. I got out of that at age 36, and I am still dealing with some "stuff" from that. I learned a whole lot over time, nothing works except they must have the desire to stop and make their lives better.

Ask me anything, I will be glad to help.

Take care

#1Texan

stormy79
12-24-2003, 01:09 PM
koot,
you can pray for her...tex meant you can't make her stop....she has to want to. you can show concern in a loving way...you never know. it might get her thinking...she might get mad, she may be grateful. i've taken my pregnant friend's ciggies out of her hand and flushed them down the toilet...(when i was young and impulsive) but she still smokes...but the baby doesn't get a choice...so i was sticking up for the baby...
you are powerless over this lady's drinking, alcoholic or not. you are right to worry. sorry we got a little debate going in the middle of your thread. i think we all learned alot here.
tex, you are a riot! holy cow paddy LOL!!!!
good luck koot. let us know hwat you do. okay?
stormy

Davidps
12-24-2003, 02:07 PM
Open Season,
:wave: How general we can be in your stereotyping statement of "but all alcoholics are heavy drinkers." What about the millions of us alcoholics in recovery? What about the periodic binge drinker? What about the thousands of alcoholics who can't drink because they are in a hospital, jail or institution? I love your generalizations and stereotyping of alcoholics. Take care!
David :wave:

Koot
12-24-2003, 07:16 PM
In reading all the input that all of you have offered me about my friend I find one thing most striking. And that is; there isn’t anything that I personally can do to help her. And that she must take the first step, which is to admit that she has a problem and then be willing to seek help. The fact that I can’t help her is very troubling for me to accept.

Koot

#1Texan
12-25-2003, 01:23 AM
Hi Koot
It is troubling for you because you seem to be a caring and compassionate person and you want her to take care of herself.

It is hard to accept these things about addicts or alcoholics, but as I'm sure you know, we can't control anyone and how they feel or do things.

It is difficult for us to watch someone close to us slowly destroy themselves, or embarass themselves, or embarass us.


I don't know if this will help or not, but see if you have any local Al-Anon groups around you, try to attend a few meetings.

I sincerly wish that this was easier for you to deal with, sometimes we have to move away from the people we care the most about so we can see more clearly, or they push us away as it was in my case.

Take care and keep posting, we are here to help.

Tex

Mantus
12-25-2003, 07:17 AM
I only read the 1st few pages of this thread,but i think that's all i really needed to read to get an understanding of the subject.It sounds to me like she just has a very bad habit,like when someone eats junk food every day.I would say that she is doing some damage to her liver and her liver enzyme values are probably going up every week or night and this will probably eventually lead to accual liver damage.I read someones reply refering to the liver regenerating,and i would just like to elaborate on that a bit.Although,It's is true that the human liver can regenerate,by repairing damaged cells,those repaired cells are of no use to us.I've been studying bodybuilding workouts,diets,and drugs for about 17yrs now,so i know a little about the liver,since it is a very important organ to a bber.I will find a good article on it,if someone would like me to,but just let me give a brief explaination.Liver cells are set up in a specific sequence.When cells die and are regenerated,they aren't regenerated back into that sequence.They are perfectly normal cells,but they serve no purpose,in that state.I may be wrong,but this is how i learned it.I know we have much more liver than we need for surival,and this is why alot of people get damaged parts of liver taken out and still lead normal lives.

bee
12-25-2003, 06:26 PM
I just wanted to add that my husbands sister died 3 weeks ago from alcohol.We didn't realize that she was drinking so much as she would call here all of the time ( we lived very far apart) depressed and crying but her husband had died nov 2002 from drinking too much alcohol so chalked it up as depression,we honestly had no idea that she was drinking so much as she didn't slur her words or anything.

She had pains in her stomach on dec 4th and her daughter called a taxi to take her to the hospital...she had lost a lot of weight since her husband had died so the dr. put her on I.V tubes so that she could get some nutrients and told her 2 children (ages 15 and 12)and her parents that she shouldn't be in the hospital for anymore then 2 days.....she died the next morning dec 5th at 5:30am...her heart stopped and they couldn't bring her back.....her liver was damaged thus causing her heart to stop.She was 39 years old.

When my husbands mother had gone to her apartment she found 20 empty vodka bottles in her apartment...I don't know if she was drinking a bottle a day or what.

bee

openseason
12-25-2003, 07:11 PM
An alcoholic does not have to hit bottom in order to get help. That is a myth. Some alcoholics can be helped with an intervention. Not all the time but sometimes. If you wait for an alcoholic to hit bottom they will most likely be dead before that. David I was referring to active alcoholics. A recovered alcoholic is clean and sober.

The lady in question is an alcoholic. 50 to 80 cans of beer in a refrigerator indicates alcoholism addiction. If anyone thinks that is social drinking then you must be an alcoholic yourself.

#1Texan
12-26-2003, 01:25 AM
" but all heavy drinkers are alcoholic"
*****************************
Once again "Where do you come up with this stuff?"


"David, I was referring to active alcoholics"

Not true in my opinion, not all "active" alcoholics are heavy drinkers, I can drink 2 beers a night, become inibriated, cause some kind of disagreement with someone or I could hurt myself somehow, that is where the Problem is, not how much I consume, 2 beers is not "heavy drinking"

I also think 50 to 80 cans in the refrigerator is a " Possesive Disorder?????", If I have 100 cans of fruit cocktail in my cabinet does that make me a fruit cocktail addict......Nope, just means I am possesive of my fruit cocktail, and I don't want to run out, I'm not going to eat all of those cans of fruit cocktail in one sitting.

Koot,
I am sorry that your questions have turned into a debate here. When baited I will bite, I know what I am talking about.