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yinksy
01-31-2004, 05:37 AM
For many of us going through it benzo withdrawal is a hideous, protracted experience. Benzodiazepines damage our biochemical ability to quieten the nervous system and produce feelings of peace and calm.
Our response to our symptoms can and does cause a secondary biochemical dysfunction. Right now the brain is overwhelmed by normal day to day input. Stress adds to that load and will produce a marked increase in symptoms.

Every time we respond with a thought or alarm: "I can't take this", "Oh my God" or "I'm dying" etc., any of these thoughts cause the body to release more stress hormones. Since our brain can no longer cope with the most minimal amount of stress hormones anything we do through our thoughts to increase these will produce more suffering.

I know that the dysphoria of withdrawal makes it almost impossible to have a positive thought but you must work towards lessening endogenous stress. Most of the time these thoughts occur as a flash we are hardly aware of, the effect is the same.
Since the dysphoria makes it difficult to produce a positive thought at will I found having a thought "mantra" or several of them were a great help. Here are a couple:
"I can stand this"
"I can do this"
"A power beyond my understanding is healing me"
"Every second I am closer to relief"
"The only way out is through"

I strongly encourage everyone to develop a list of his or her own as a sort of rapid response statement for self-calming. If you have an anxiety disorder this is a major part of your healing work after benzos.

23. Sedative Hypnotics

Sleep is one of the most fragile processes the human brain engages in. Easily disrupted and often slow to recover.

All sedative medications, including Ambien, alcohol and Kava disrupt one or more phases of the sleep cycle leading to further mental compromise. None of the sedative hypnotics will ever restore normal sleep but merely anesthetize the brain.

Ambien, Kava and all typical sedative hypnotics create further neural dysfunction through tolerance or biochemical dysregulation. Simply the more you take them the more you will be unable to sleep without them.

In an emergency many patients have found antihistamines like Vistaril to be of use. They provide a sleep that is far from normal; usually have a lethargy period after awakening, but you will be unconscious.

The only way to have normal sleep is to allow your body to recover from these medications (which is usually protracted insomnia), develop good sleep hygiene and deal with the underlying stresses that disrupted the sleep in the first place.

24. When Your Back Is Against the Wall

The first thing the Psychiatric Diagnostic Manual states when making a diagnosis is to eliminate the possibility of medication induced symptoms. This means as far as possible get the patient back to a clean (no medication) baseline. Since benzodiazepine detoxification is the most problematic, other suspected symptom causing medications should be eliminated first. If you have been placed on more than one medication at a time it is impossible to know what you are responding to, and should cause you to question your physician (unless he is doing crisis management). If you are not stable before withdrawal it is a good idea to work with your physician to do trial eliminations of all other medications (related to anxiety or depression) before tapering.

I have seen patients suffer needlessly from medication side effects thinking it was withdrawal.

Most important and please do not pass right over this one!!! The neural changes made in the brain from exposure to benzodiazepines prevent the brain from properly responding to incoming stimuli. Often described as stress intolerance it is actually much more complex.

Your nervous system has lost a major part of its ability to slow the firing of nerve cells in response to stimuli. This can be an internal stimulus, such as thought or external as environmental stress. In florid withdrawal the brain reacts to minor stress almost to the point of a seizure like activity. A graphic example is a garden hose with an attached nozzle: a pulse of water comes through: you turn the nozzle off and on to properly place the water in the right amount and in the right place.

With benzodiazepine damage to the GABA-ergic system and the neurons themselves it is like an unattended hose without a nozzle. Turn the faucet on and the hose flails uncontrollably. This equates to neuron misfiring, excessive firing and hyperstimulation.

We can have some effect on this process by reducing dietary stimulants, daily aerobic exercise and meditation/relaxation exercises. The single most effective effort we can make is to eliminate stress. Learning to change our thoughts to positive, soothing, fear eliminating is critical. More critical, is to grasp that we must change our environment - if we just had a heart attack we would probably not arrange our home so we were compelled to go up and down stairs repeatedly.

In florid withdrawals our brain requires we severely limit the incoming stimuli. This may mean drastic lifestyle changes. Ask for help; reduce responsibilities to an absolute minimum - then cut those in half! Attempting to keep up the previous life style will only result in additional time to heal and more suffering.

Try not to see releasing these responsibilities as a depressive loss. It is a healing gesture towards yourself that will lead to a stronger, competent person in less time.

25. Tapering - Cold Turkey - Seizures

Benzodiazepine exposure causes major problems for the neurons to calm themselves. They not only lose the ability to damp down the hyperactivity because of brain chemistry changes, they are physically damaged in many patients so that even normal amounts of inhibitory transmitters (when they resume) are not able to stop the agitation.

The question: cold turkey or taper? Once you have a tolerance or are withdrawing the neurons take time to heal. Unfortunately neural tissue is the slowest of all body tissue to regenerate. Since benzodiazepine withdrawal often activates a form of seizure activity (not a seizure in the strict sense) the less you distress the neuron the less agitation and suffering.

Sudden medication withdrawal causes the most trauma to the neurons and once started takes longer to quiet down. Too rapid a detox may also start a hyperactive cycle. A slow detox is the best insurance to prevent the unnecessary agitation of the neurons.

For some patients the neurons refuse to heal until all benzodiazepines are out of the system - this makes a prolonged detoxification counterproductive. If you make small dosage reductions and do not have a significant symptom reduction in 30 to 60 days you are probably in that class. It will avail nothing to draw the process out for these patients.

If you have made too large a cut and find yourself in trouble you may also discover that resuming your previous dose will not return you to your previous comfort level. Starting a florid withdrawal is again like a seizure or pain; it takes more to control it after the fact. If you cannot endure the symptoms you may need to ramp back up to a much higher dose and wait until the withdrawal settles down.

The million dollar question patients used to ask at the clinic was: did I go too fast and is this why I'm suffering so? No one knows how you would have been had you done it differently. We do know that for some even long, two year detoxes do not prevent a significant symptoms emergence.

If you have been off medication for a period of a month or more you will probably not benefit from reinitiating the benzodiazepine medication; in fact many patients become much worse. If your withdrawal is extremely severe at this point it is better to use Tegretol or another anti-seizure medication.

Anytime we are in pain it is a normal response to search out what could be done differently and we should! For a high percentage of benzodiazepine patients there is no way other than white knuckles, support and time.

28. Parenthood

Most people come to benzos from a history of anxiety or failed coping strategies. We find things in our lives to distract us from internal cues that our core selves are suffering and need attention. Work, eating, high risk behaviors, co-dependencies, constant activities, relationships with drama, etc.

This creation of masking "static" behavior prevents us from having to sit with the uncomfortable feelings and for many, the past wounds. The burial of core knowledge and the dance we do to escape it sets the stage for needing a chemical or other addiction to stop the murmurs of inner screaming.

Anxiety is only the end stage of ignoring our spirit, failure to nurture ourselves and a lifetime of denial. The more out of control and the more our inner selves are suffering the larger the required distraction. For some we are drama junkies, always being involved in a dysfunctional situation, for others it is engaging in socially acceptable behaviors: like parenthood.

If you have come to the point you have needed a chemical to make your life manageable there is a good chance that your motives and drives for having a child are not pure. Children totally capture our attention, providing for their constant needs, normal parental concerns and the blur of daily responsibilities. Parenting can often be the next drug, especially for women!

We arrived at this point through genetics of sensitivity, unmanageable stress and a host of dysfunctional thoughts and behaviors. It is impossible to recover to full peace and happiness without some major internal work...to the degree we choose to distract ourselves will be the degree that we engage in the old destructive behaviors of denial and escape. These are not the things that should be passed to our children! Those of us who need this work the most are usually the ones who consider themselves OK.

Twinlynn
01-31-2004, 07:33 AM
Yinksy, (where did you get that name? Are you a character from literature? Russian? Polish? I give up.)

Stumbled out of bed at 6 a.m. (and I do mean stumbled--I tripped over my dog), staggered out in about 12 degrees farenheit to retrieve a couple of quadruple shot lattes, then sat down and read your treatise on benzos.

Wow. Is this all from your head?? Or partially from a text? The reason I ask is that I see a few numbers...23...24, preceding some of the topics. Whatever--it is amazing reading. It sure woke this dozy brain from a perfectly mindless state of somnabulence!! :D Deep reading first thing in the morning, so I am going to read it twice. (read it several hours ago.) It's 10:20 a.m. here in NY.

One thing particularly struck me. I have been a lousy sleeper from the day I was born!!! Waking every hour or two, going to the bathroom (yes, I had that checked out). I'm taking one ambien a night--in halves--and STILL wake up. There was never a time in my life that I slept normally. Whether I was off antidepressants, on antdepressants (which saved my life), hydros, benzos, Excedrin, Panadol....you name it. Even when I was on NOTHING I slept like "The Talking Clock" (a telephone number you call here for the exact time.) If you tell me I have to leave the house at 3 a.m .(which I recently did)-I'll be up by exactly 2. Though I can "program" myself for 2:20 if I crave a few more minutes. My friends can't believe it.

I wake up very early--for good--at 5 a.m. or 5:30. Go to bed quite early. To be honest, if I went off the Ambien--I doubt I could ever tell by any sleeping changes that I was off it!! :rolleyes: I guess I get about 5 or 6 very interrupted hours of sleep per night. The only positive side of all this getting up in the middle of the night is that I have increased my reading time ten-fold!!!

Anyway, I've been like this for all my years......so I was very interested as to how sleep works in the brain. I've studied (just for my own interest) the causes and effects of depression on the brain since my first full-blown clinical depression--1974, when I was living in London. Tricyclics were just becoming "the thing." I had practically no side effects--and went from feeling I had been granted membership in the Beelzebub Club, to, three months later, remembering how lovely a flower could smell!! I tried over the years to taper off--and was rewarded by the worst ten years of obsessive-compulsiveness. Was saved by Prozac, which aims at that behavior. After three very major clinical depressions (endogenous in two cases--at least to my way of thinking!), I don't "test" my brain anymore. These pills totally stablized me. It's the hydros that have to go!

Anyway, thanks for all this information. Makes me think of a New Yorker Magazine cartoon that cracked me up. I've hung it up at work. It shows a patient sitting in his underwear on an examining table in some medical cublicle. He is obviously talking away, describing his symptoms....and his Doctor is holding up a hand to stop him, saying "w-a-a-a-a-a-a-a-y too much information!!!" :D I could be that patient--there's never enough information.

Great, informative post. Both my dogs are snoring away right now--I study them prodgiously to learn more about true sleep! :jester:

By the way--my identical twin sister has EXACTLY the same medical history and sleep pattern that I do. (Except Alice's clinical depression were slightly less severe. Each time, mine required 3 months "isolation" from life's responsibilities! ANY stimulation--and I mean ANY ( i.e.; the loud ticking of a clock, a voice on a radio) was unbearable. Strange.

Again, thanks for taking the time to post all that informative stuff.

Lynn

sammi
01-31-2004, 07:50 AM
Wow Yinksy, that is some really good information. Thanks!
Sammi

yinksy
01-31-2004, 09:38 AM
Sammi and Lynn
I have just written a long post to you and it has disappeared! Bummer.
Sorry - I have misled you - above is part of an article by "Rik" - I was constrained by space - its only about 1/4 of the article - if you want me to post the rest in sections - let me know - wont do unless you ask - might bore the a** off other people! If you want to know more about Rik - he is very knowledgeable on the subject - just type in benzodiazepines and Rik into google - you will find!
I was on ativan for 2 years - just taking 1 mg at night for sleep - as prescribed by my doctor - therapuetic level - gradually worked up to 2 mg - decided to stop and ended up in full florid withdrawal - had to re-instate and taper off using valium - 8 long, depressing, anxiety ridden, debilitating months! The truth about benzos is that their benefits are only felt for 2 to 3 weeks and very soon tolerance sets in - then the user experiences the side effects of the benzo itslef- and they are listed as anxiety, depression, headaches, insomnia.......... and many many more. And so the benzos actually produce the very symptoms for which they are actually prescribed! They are truly drugs from hell! There is an interesting thread on the Depression board - called something like "can benzos be managed?" - worth a read. A man at the peak of his career discovering he is dependent on xanax...... and his struggle trying to get off. A woman who talks about a clinic in her town - totally dedicated to users of xanax. Powerful stuff!
Lynn - your poor dog - hope she/he recovered from being stood on! Doggie sleep? I understand that dogs' brains are simply awash with serotonin! LOL Well - they sure have a good philosophy of life? Eat, sleep, walkies......... not bad! Well - my dog is spayed so she doesnt think of "the other"!
Y

Banker
01-31-2004, 08:56 PM
Yinksy - Hi and thanks for the information. You've obviously done tons of research on this so let me ask you some questions and maybe you can help. I've been taking xanax/klonopin/ativan (alternating between these) for the last 6 years. I have a 19 mo old so when I went for my first OB visit, and told my doctor that I was taking 1 mg of klonopin each day... he just said to take a .5 every other day for two weeks and then stop. I followed his advice and had no symptoms at all. Of course, I was pregnant and in the early stages so I was very sick from the pregnancy and VERY tired as well. But the pregnancy felt no different from my other two which were prior to my benzo use. Why do you think it was no big deal for me and for others it takes years?
Next question - As you probably have read and/or know... I had an extremely difficult and traumatic childhood. Mother was a BAD drug addict, and I had no father in my life at all. In fact, the man I thought was my father (I found out when I was 18) was actually NOT my father. I met my real father around the age of 19... and guess what? He's a recovering alchoholic... We tried to form a relationship because I had always longed for a father but it simply did not work out (which was his choice... just too hard on his current family that he had). Anyway, I had to literally take care of my mother from a very young age to make sure that she and I didn't end up dead from the house burning down from her cigs to her driving under the influence of the drugs. It was absolutely horrible... I loved going to school as it was my escape and I knew I was safe for just a few hours. When I turned 18 or 19, I developed these severe phobias... bad weather, tonadoes, riding as a passenger in the car with friends (or anyone). I would stay at home under a couch in the basement scared that a tornado would come.... even when there wasn't a cloud in the sky. I would cancel outings with friends based on who was driving and if there was a slightest chance of rain. It was really, really bad. Once I started working... and I knew that rain was coming... I would get to work at 4 or 5 in the a.m. to try and avoid driving in it. I'm telling you... I was a complete nut. Oh, also... used to get up 10 times a night thinking someone was breaking into my apartment. This was when I was living w/my husband. Needless to say, I got on an anti depressant and xanax and ever since then, I've been able to live my life without debilitating fear all of the time. Of course, throw in the addiction to lortab which now I'm on Suboxone for... What would you recommend for someone in my situation? Also, forgot to mention... mother died from an accidental overdose about 9 years ago... I knew it was going to happen and had detached myself from her prior to her death (live daily with the guilt now). Anyway, what are your thoughts on how someone in my 'dramatic' situation could have survived without the help of medicine? Just to add... I'm still taking Xanax and don't abuse but do take it daily. I'm definitely dependant on it... but I don't abuse it. Thanks so much and let me know your thoughts. I'm sorry this is long but wanted to add one more SEVERE fear that i had... When my first child was 16 months old, he had a febrile seizure (from a high fever) and it happened when he was in the car w/me. I pulled over and screamed for help at the local grocery store. He went to the hospital and ended up being fine... However, I was so terrified that it was going to happen again, I could not be alone with him. I was just so scared even when he was healthy and no fever in site. I was just paralyzed by the fear. This is what lead me to the first Shrink. Sorry this is so long, I just wanted your opinion of how my issues should have been treated. I think once so much damage has been done to someone, there isn't much that anyone can do except to result to medication.

rosietee
01-31-2004, 10:13 PM
Banker, wow you have been through so much and look how far you have come. You are amazing. I too, went on xanax when I was exposed to a trauma--when my first husband committed suicide I absolutely could not function. I never went on alot (never more than 1 or 2 mg per day, and infrequently at that), and thought I had tapered off about 4 years later, as I didn't need it anymore, but ended up having a seizure (could have been from the Wellbutrin I was on, though). Anyway, your story did touch me. Also, I didn't get in touch with my real father until I was 17 (my mother wouldn't let me see him or his family after I was 3). I developed a close relationship with my grandparents, after I turned 17, but they have since passed away. My father and I are now estranged and no one is sure way, but it was a blow to me. He won't talk to me at all. Supposedly it has something to do with my mother having his address and he doesn't want any contact with her and he blames it on me that she could get ahold of him. When my husband died, I asked her to call my aunt for his number, because I couldn't find it and I thought maybe he would want to come to the funeral. The last time I talked to him, I was still in grief and all he could talk about is that he is unlisted for a reason, did I understand that.
But I feel like wow, what is wrong with me if my own father doesn't want me? My aunt and her husband are very supportive of me however. I feel robbed of all those years I missed the support of that wonderful side of the family (not including dad, I guess).

Sorry, didn't mean to go on about me. It just sounds like you are a great mom and have come so far.

rosie

Banker
02-01-2004, 06:16 AM
Rosie - I can so relate to what you are saying. My real father doesn't want to have anything to do w/me either. He claims that his current wife is the one that forbids the relationship but we all know, that if he wanted to have a relationship w/me, he could. I am still not over the rejection as I longed to have a father my whole childhood and adult life as well. Trust me, I know how you feel. I do know that it's not me and that he's the one that is missing out on having a relationship with me and my children... you should know that it is not you either and they will pay for their actions one day. What really breaks my heart is when my children ask about 'my dad'...(they know my mother passed away) and why they can't see him. The other day, my oldest said 'my friend's grandpa lives far away but he still gets cards from him'. See, I lied and said he lived far away which he doesn't. Then, I said he was too old to write a card.... Then my oldest child (8) said, well can I write him a card? It just broke my heart. It's tough and I feel for you. I just have to continue to tell myself and you should too, that it's not US... there is something wrong w/them. What kind of parent would not want to have a relationship with their own child? A BAD parent... we should know this!

rosietee
02-01-2004, 10:20 AM
Rosie - I can so relate to what you are saying. My real father doesn't want to have anything to do w/me either. He claims that his current wife is the one that forbids the relationship but we all know, that if he wanted to have a relationship w/me, he could. I am still not over the rejection as I longed to have a father my whole childhood and adult life as well. Trust me, I know how you feel. I do know that it's not me and that he's the one that is missing out on having a relationship with me and my children... you should know that it is not you either and they will pay for their actions one day. What really breaks my heart is when my children ask about 'my dad'...(they know my mother passed away) and why they can't see him. The other day, my oldest said 'my friend's grandpa lives far away but he still gets cards from him'. See, I lied and said he lived far away which he doesn't. Then, I said he was too old to write a card.... Then my oldest child (8) said, well can I write him a card? It just broke my heart. It's tough and I feel for you. I just have to continue to tell myself and you should too, that it's not US... there is something wrong w/them. What kind of parent would not want to have a relationship with their own child? A BAD parent... we should know this!

Thanks so much, Banker. I was fortunate in that my mom did remarry when I was young so I do have another dad that I call "dad" and is a wonderful grandfather. He has since remarried a wonderful woman so they have another grandmother to boot.
gotta go
rosie

Banker
02-01-2004, 11:21 AM
Yinsky - thank you for the additional information. On Oprah the other day, they showed a mother and wife going through xanax withdrawal and trying to stay off of it. It was so very sad. She went into detox and documented her daily struggles. It was horrible... Anyway, I do know their potential for abuse and the dangers associated with them. Unfortunately, I just haven't found another way to function without them. I don't know how to handle my phobias and anxiety attacks without them. That's why I was asking you if you knew if alternatives to benzos for people with severe anxiety and irrational fears. In my early twenties, I was so scared of ANY addictive pills that when I had to fly, I literally thought I was going to die from a heart attack because of the panick. My aunt kept trying to give me one or two for the flight but i said NO WAY. I had a drink instead which actually made the flight worse for me. Then, after my child had that seizure and I was where I couldn't care for him because of the fears, I had to go see a doctor. I couldn't let my anxiety disorder get in the way of caring for my baby. Anyway, I was just wondering what people do for their anxiety problems if/when they stop taking xanax. I know you are also against anti depressants... What has been your experience with them and why do you think they are so bad? I'm just curious to know what you've either been through or what you've seen. Again, thanks for the information. I really do know they are bad, however, I don't think for myself, that they cause more problems for me. They have actually allowed me to function in the 'real world' and also allowed me to be extremely productive in my professional career. Thanks again for the information.

yinksy
02-01-2004, 03:36 PM
Banker
Sorry to be so useless in this.
I am in daily contact with a young woman with the most dreadful anxiety. She does not function in the outside world at all. She is only 27 and has to live at home with her parents. Her description of her anxiety would make you weep - and she struggles and struggles. Everthing to her is anxious making. She worries and worries about everything. She has been on every type of medication under the sun. She spent many of her adolescent years voluntarily in a mental institution. For the last few years she has been on benzos. These helped in the beginning but she has now become tolerant and gets no relief whatsoever. She is desperate. Is even considering brain surgery - it is all so bleak for her. And she is a wonderful, witty, sharply intelligent young woman. I have never in my life felt so helpless about anyone ......... Poor kid.
I only say all this in an effort to show that I can in some measure understand your own difficulties. It is wonderful that you can lead a normal life and look after your family. And so I would not seek to speak negatively about these drugs in all situations. If these drugs make your life manageable - then that is great - and thank goodness for it.
My own experience is so simple - I became dependent when prescribed for me following a bereavement............... found myself dependent and had to undergo a taper to get off. It was the worst 8 months of my life - flu for 8 months, lethargy that you just couldnt fathom, felt I was walking thro glue, deep black depression............. oh and the rest - wont bore you!
I only post about benzos in here in the hope that people who so casually use them when withdrawing from opiates and some who occasionally use them for sleep - will be aware of the potential dangers.
The only thing I suppose that I would say to you is to look out for those side effects which in fact mirror the symptoms for which xanax was prescribed. You will read stories of people who took xanax for anxiety, and then discovered that it turned on them and actually produced the anxiety - worse than the original. And only by coming off were they finally released from that anxiety. Perhaps this is not relevant to you. And certainly there is a wealth of information and personal stories should you wish to tap into them.
Anyway - wishing you all the very best,
Y

Banker
02-01-2004, 05:44 PM
That poor girl. People w/severe anxiety live in a world of their own. Their fears are so real and they feel like nobody in this world can save them from their fear. It's horrible. Anyway, thank you for sharing and I do agree with you about why you post this information. You are absolutely right. The thing is, I knew very well that lortabs were addicting and took them anyway at first for pain and then for recreation... Even after watching my mother die from these pills. I think that we all can know about the potential dangers... it's just a 'it will never happen to me' mentality that all addicts have. At least, that's what I feel. You can be so educated about things but still do it because it 'feels good' and it's an escape. You really do think you can handle it and stop whenever you want to. It's such a horrible, sad thing yet people continue to get addicted every day even though they know what could happen. Again, thank you for the information and keep on informing us.... couldn't hurt, right? Maybe it can save someone from the nightmare. Let me ask you one other question that's probably stupid... Why do you think I had no withdrawal symptoms when I withdrew only after two weeks? I had been on them daily for a year. Everyone in my family is on a benzo and I was well aware of the dangers of tapering to fast or just stopping and I strongly questioned my OB when he told me just two weeks. He was adamant about the instructions and thank heaven, I had no withdrawals. What is up with that?

yinksy
02-02-2004, 02:24 AM
That poor girl. People w/severe anxiety live in a world of their own. Their fears are so real and they feel like nobody in this world can save them from their fear. It's horrible. Anyway, thank you for sharing and I do agree with you about why you post this information. You are absolutely right. The thing is, I knew very well that lortabs were addicting and took them anyway at first for pain and then for recreation... Even after watching my mother die from these pills. I think that we all can know about the potential dangers... it's just a 'it will never happen to me' mentality that all addicts have. At least, that's what I feel. You can be so educated about things but still do it because it 'feels good' and it's an escape. You really do think you can handle it and stop whenever you want to. It's such a horrible, sad thing yet people continue to get addicted every day even though they know what could happen. Again, thank you for the information and keep on informing us.... couldn't hurt, right? Maybe it can save someone from the nightmare. Let me ask you one other question that's probably stupid... Why do you think I had no withdrawal symptoms when I withdrew only after two weeks? I had been on them daily for a year. Everyone in my family is on a benzo and I was well aware of the dangers of tapering to fast or just stopping and I strongly questioned my OB when he told me just two weeks. He was adamant about the instructions and thank heaven, I had no withdrawals. What is up with that?
Yes Banker - agree wholeheartedly with what you say about taking mood altering chemicals! But - I guess man has always done it? There is no time in history when man didnt "smoke" or "drink" something which produced euphoria. I think that once you have the self knowledge that we have in here - then it is all "spoilt" for us! Never again can we take mood altering substances without a "conscience"? A guilt trip.
You ask my thoughts on your own lack of withdrawal symptoms. I could have 2 guesses............ Perhaps you were lucky and were not dependent after a year's use - there are such people - you may be one of the lucky ones - or - withdrawal had not yet set in - apparently there can be a delay of between 10 days and a few weeks till withdrawal hits - have a look in the Ashton Manual - you can read online - I only make a guess.
Perhaps I could ask your opinion now? The kid of whom I spoke above.......... can you think of anything that might work in her case? She has been on everything in the spectrum thro from heavy anti-psychotics to benzos and nothing now helps. Brain surgery has to be a terrible decision ................. I would not trust the surgeons - she will be a guinea pig? Any ideas from your own experience or research into anxiety?
Would appreciate!
Y