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    Old 04-20-2005, 03:17 PM   #31
    IBGECKO
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Jetson
    I didn't go to college. In fact, I barely made it out of high school (many people with AS do drop out) because I was so unhappy and alone and eventually apathy set in and my grades took a dive. After a few years of on-again-off-again employment I took a one-year electronics course at an adult vocational school and did quite well. That basically proved that it was the environment that was stopping me from being successful and not a lack of ability. About five years after that I started training for my curent trade.
    Jetson - Did you know you had AS when you were in school, or were your diagnosed as an adult? I would imagine that if you weren't diagnosed as an adolescent, school must have been torture, not that it wouldn't be otherwise. The only difference would be the knowledge of why you weren't like the other kids. Throw in processing your sexual orientation, and kudos to you for having come through the other side. I really appreciate your perspective, as so much of what you say hits the proverbial nail on the head as far as my son is concerned (though it is already abundantly clear that he is heterosexual. Yes, folks, puberty is rearing it's head at 10 1/2!) Thank you for your candidness, and I hope to see you posting often!

     
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    Old 04-22-2005, 02:51 AM   #32
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IBGECKO
    Jetson - Did you know you had AS when you were in school, or were your diagnosed as an adult? I would imagine that if you weren't diagnosed as an adolescent, school must have been torture, not that it wouldn't be otherwise. The only difference would be the knowledge of why you weren't like the other kids. Throw in processing your sexual orientation, and kudos to you for having come through the other side.
    There was no such thing as an AS diagnosis when I was in school. Prior to age 10 it wasn't much of a problem because I had no interest in other people my age. From 10 onwards I quickly became aware that I was different but didn't have a clue what was wrong. All I knew was that the other kids said I was weird and started a pattern of bullying that would last a decade.

    The word "****" was a common insult in those days and I heard it a lot even before puberty. When it eventually occurred to me around age 11 that I did find boys (and girls) attractive that only made things worse, as now my inner-most thoughts seemed to be transparent to others. By the time I turned 13 I was thinking of suicide on a regular basis.

    I still don't know how I made it.

     
    Old 04-22-2005, 03:23 AM   #33
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    Angry Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by IBGECKO
    Thank you for your candidness, and I hope to see you posting often!
    Sadly, I think this will be my last post on this forum. I no longer feel comfortable supplying content for an organization that uses censorship in order to prevent people from finding other sources of information. Rest assured that children with Aspergers not only grow up, but we also develop a social conscience. There are at least two other sites on the web dedicated to Asperger's Syndrome that have forums just like this one. Finding them is an exercise for the reader....

     
    Old 04-26-2005, 08:54 PM   #34
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Yes, people with mild Autism can be sucessful. I personally have Allergy induced mild autism. And I have graduated from Highschool, taking a regular course load. I am know attending a local bible college in hopes of being a Pastor. I have found that diet is critical. I am on a gluten free, dairy free, low fruit, low sugar diet. And when I cheat on these foods I go into the Autistic state. I have also been involved in the local town plays and had a large part, and hope to be married and have children someday as well. So I would tell your child, that having Autism is a challege, but if delt with properly, and if you get the support from teachers and Teachers Aids (if needed), school and life isn't really that bad after all.

     
    Old 04-27-2005, 04:18 PM   #35
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Sweet_girl
    Yes, people with mild Autism can be sucessful. I personally have Allergy induced mild autism. And I have graduated from Highschool, taking a regular course load. I am know attending a local bible college in hopes of being a Pastor. I have found that diet is critical. I am on a gluten free, dairy free, low fruit, low sugar diet. And when I cheat on these foods I go into the Autistic state. I have also been involved in the local town plays and had a large part, and hope to be married and have children someday as well. So I would tell your child, that having Autism is a challege, but if delt with properly, and if you get the support from teachers and Teachers Aids (if needed), school and life isn't really that bad after all.
    Did you have Autism as a child too? Do you know when you are in an Autistic State and how different are you?
    Michelle
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    Old 05-09-2005, 06:15 PM   #36
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    Exclamation Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Queen,
    I realize your post was put in in march of this year and it is now may but, when i read your story I was shocked and saddened. You need to get your daughter some help. Treatment works!!!! Our son will be four in July. He was officially dianosed with HFA last summer. We had already been through about 7 months of in home speech and special ed therapy.

    He is now in an ABA classroom in a preschool for children with developmental delays and has made great progress.

    Please don't think I am being rude, but everything you say about your daughter seems to fit into the HFA criteria. She needs services!!! I'd hate for you to be sorry later. Historically, autistic kids do better the earlier treatment is started. The longer you wait, the harder it is.

     
    Old 05-10-2005, 02:18 PM   #37
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    I'm not sure what you mean by "normal." I have five adult children and the fifth has Asperberger's, considered high functioning autistic. In many ways he is more "normal" than the others in that he thinks about serious issues and has great conversations with us about his life, his values, his faith, his future. He is currently living in Beijing, studying Asian art and philosophy and learning Mandarin. He gets straight A's in a Jesuit university. But it's also really hard - most of the American kids think he's weird and dislike his offbeat social skills, but the Chinese people love him - he has many Chinese friends. We have encouraged him that he can try anything and do anything within his abilities, like anyone else. He has wanted to be a history professor, but has discovered his wooden affect might make that a difficult endeavor. That's okay, now he's looking at other options.

    Your child can find great success in what he/she is good at, and often these kids have tremendous focus which can make them brilliant in some areas. But we spent a lot of time role playing social situations, conversations, and such. We homeschooled for most of his life - till 10th grade, so that we could reduce stigmas and labels and really focus on strengthening him in areas of weakness. As he wanted (and needed) more social interaction, we made changes, always monitoring how it affected him. His senior year in high school was so awful (kids taunting him to kill himself, and here he was in the top 3% of his class), we pulled him out, had him take the GED, and started him in junior college. He excelled, despite his continual challenges of high anxiety, stress, depression, and social awkwardness. My husband and I spend a lot of time "talking him off a ledge," which is our family vernacular for talking him through major anxiety attacks.

    So much of helping our son be his best self is what we tell him about himself and how we encourage him in how great he's doing (not the rah rah self esteem stuff, but genuine affirmation). We also talk a lot about ways to make friends and be one - that missing "inner script" of intuition and body language is one of the more disabling parts of most autism - these guys just look so awkward and uncomfortable in their own skin. Now that he is older (20), we work with books like Boothman's "How to Make People Like You" (I don't agree with all his practices, but some are very good). We have also told a core group of people at church what he has and what that means, so that he has a larger community of those who accept him and work with him.

    You will grieve for your child's struggles and limitations, weep over his disappointments, but you can also be so crazy about who he is and what courage he has to keep on learning and becoming. It's an amazing journey. Persevere. It will strengthen all of you.

     
    Old 05-10-2005, 03:12 PM   #38
    IBGECKO
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by molldl
    I'm not sure what you mean by "normal." I have five adult children and the fifth has Asperberger's, considered high functioning autistic. In many ways he is more "normal" than the others in that he thinks about serious issues and has great conversations with us about his life, his values, his faith, his future. He is currently living in Beijing, studying Asian art and philosophy and learning Mandarin. He gets straight A's in a Jesuit university. But it's also really hard - most of the American kids think he's weird and dislike his offbeat social skills, but the Chinese people love him - he has many Chinese friends. We have encouraged him that he can try anything and do anything within his abilities, like anyone else. He has wanted to be a history professor, but has discovered his wooden affect might make that a difficult endeavor. That's okay, now he's looking at other options.

    Your child can find great success in what he/she is good at, and often these kids have tremendous focus which can make them brilliant in some areas. But we spent a lot of time role playing social situations, conversations, and such. We homeschooled for most of his life - till 10th grade, so that we could reduce stigmas and labels and really focus on strengthening him in areas of weakness. As he wanted (and needed) more social interaction, we made changes, always monitoring how it affected him. His senior year in high school was so awful (kids taunting him to kill himself, and here he was in the top 3% of his class), we pulled him out, had him take the GED, and started him in junior college. He excelled, despite his continual challenges of high anxiety, stress, depression, and social awkwardness. My husband and I spend a lot of time "talking him off a ledge," which is our family vernacular for talking him through major anxiety attacks.

    So much of helping our son be his best self is what we tell him about himself and how we encourage him in how great he's doing (not the rah rah self esteem stuff, but genuine affirmation). We also talk a lot about ways to make friends and be one - that missing "inner script" of intuition and body language is one of the more disabling parts of most autism - these guys just look so awkward and uncomfortable in their own skin. Now that he is older (20), we work with books like Boothman's "How to Make People Like You" (I don't agree with all his practices, but some are very good). We have also told a core group of people at church what he has and what that means, so that he has a larger community of those who accept him and work with him.

    You will grieve for your child's struggles and limitations, weep over his disappointments, but you can also be so crazy about who he is and what courage he has to keep on learning and becoming. It's an amazing journey. Persevere. It will strengthen all of you.
    Thank you so much for your beautiful and inspiring post about your son. We are currently going through a difficult time with our 10 1/2 year old Asperger's son, who has recently been diagnosed with OCD/Compulsive Anxiety Disorder. He is literally pulling his hair out as a means of managing stress and anxiety (this is an OCD condition known as trichotillomania). Like your son, his future potential is nearly limitless, but we are deep in the heart of the rocky road to adulthood, and it is very easy to be discouraged and have doubts along the way. Reading a story like yours helps to see the light at the end of tunnel. Thank you.

     
    Old 05-11-2005, 03:46 PM   #39
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    Re: Can children with mild Autism grow up to be normal adults?

    When I started this post Normal to me was an adult without social issues, depression, unable to read people. Stuff like that. If a child with Autism wouldn't be able to live alone ever. That was all. I love my not so normal child and wouldn't trade him for the world. I just don't know what to expect in 5 10 15 years. I just want to do everything I can to help him to grow into a happy adult. A functioning adult. I know he is smart and gifted, I just want him to be out there in the world not afraid of it. Thank you all for your post about this. It has given me hope.
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