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Cancer then BPH


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Old 09-27-2017, 08:07 AM   #1
lenvegas
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Cancer then BPH

Hi all, my brother who is 67 had prostate cancer 3 years ago and was treated successfully with radiation. Over the past year he has had frequency problems and was diagnosed with BPH and is contemplating on the recommendation of his doctor of having green light laser procedure to reduce the size of his prostate. The doctor said he will need to wear a catheter for six weeks after the procedure. My question is, would this procedure be ok considering he had cancer before and what are some of the dangers of the green light laser and would any of you recommend a better procedure with minimal risks. Thanks.

 
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Old 09-27-2017, 02:56 PM   #2
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Re: Cancer then BPH

How certain is he that he has BPH? What test was given to get his diagnosis?

And if he does have BPH, it might be worthwhile to explore dietary means to deal with it. The problem is: Urologists are not nutritionists or dieticians but they will likely tell you that diet has nothing to do with it.

New studies even suggest that diet and exercise can have an impact on retarding or preventing prostate cancer.

Last edited by JohnR41; 09-27-2017 at 03:12 PM.

 
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Old 09-28-2017, 05:02 AM   #3
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Re: Cancer then BPH

[QUOTE=JohnR41;5469610]How certain is he that he has BPH? What test was given to get his diagnosis?

And if he does have BPH, it might be worthwhile to explore dietary means to deal with it. The problem is: Urologists are not nutritionists or dieticians but they will likely tell you that diet has nothing to do with it.

New studies even suggest that diet and exercise can have an impact on retarding or preventing prostate cancer.
I believe the doctor came to the conclusion after a DRE and cystoscope but I'll have to ask him if other tests were done. You are right about diet and exercise as I am a vegan who trains hard daily and never a prostate problem. I have been telling my brother for years to change his diet and take prostate supplements but has never heeded my advice and continues to eat processed meats and junk and is 40 pounds overweight.

 
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Old 09-28-2017, 09:00 AM   #4
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Smile Re: Cancer then BPH

Quote:
lenvegas:
I believe the doctor came to the conclusion after a DRE and cystoscope but I'll have to ask him if other tests were done. You are right about diet and exercise as I am a vegan who trains hard daily and never a prostate problem. I have been telling my brother for years to change his diet and take prostate supplements but has never heeded my advice and continues to eat processed meats and junk and is 40 pounds overweight.
Best regards to your brother and glad to hear that you are doing well as a vegan. My father had prostate cancer and it turned into bone cancer after the doctor thought he was in remission following radiation treatment. My brother had prostate cancer and pancreas cancer. So, guess what? I became a vegan 12 years ago after searching and searching for a diet that would give me the best chance to avoid cancer and other degenerative diseases. And I'm happy to say that at age 76 I have no health issues whatsoever.

Last edited by JohnR41; 09-28-2017 at 09:08 AM.

 
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Old 10-03-2017, 03:14 PM   #5
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Re: Cancer then BPH

Hi lenvegas,

I have followed this conversation, but until yesterday had only heard the term “green light laser”, knowing almost nothing about it, and while I have very mild issues with post-radiation continence, that has really not been on my radar much. However, yesterday I was reviewing a talk by a doctor specializing in incontinence and urinary blockage who was well enough regarded by some medical peers to be asked to present to a well-known and very large conference of prostate cancer patients. During Q&A he was asked about TURPs, and he also brought up two alternatives: green light laser and “the button”, two emerging technologies for BPH. I was surprised to learn that he had a rather negative opinion of this new technology that sounded cool.

The gist of what he said, comparing these technologies to the well-known and very long-standing TURP technology, was that they don’t seem to him to be as effective and they have some undesirable side effects. The most memorable point he made was that the reoperation rate at ten years for TURPs is around 10%, while the rate is probably 30% to 40% for the newer technologies. He also said that men coming to him with problems after these procedures, when they are evaluated, will have had only 10% or 20% of the tissue that was blocking the urine channel removed in contrast to a complete resection as happens with a traditional TURP. Of course, it is possible that the men he sees are the problem cases and not the successes, which possibly are the majority. That said, as a savvy doctor specializing in urinary issues, I would think he would have taken that into consideration, but I’m not sure. As for side effects, he said that he sees men who have a lot of scar tissue after these two newish procedures, and they tell him that they did well for a year but then were back where they started. Again, they may have been the problem cases rather than the successes.

As a layman facing questions like this, I often go to www.pubmed.gov, which is a unit under the US National Institutes of Health that publishes abstracts of medical research papers from all over the world. This is the same research that informs doctors, and sometimes it is difficult for us laymen to interpret; however, often it is pretty clear. I just checked the site using the search string “benign prostatic hyperplasia AND green light laser “ and got 31 results. I looked at a few of the abstracts, and those particular papers conveyed a more favorable image for green light lasers and BPH. You could do your own search for TURP instead of green light laser. If you do your own research but run into questions regarding research terms (such as what the statistics mean), I may be able to help.

By the way, one of my types of medication is well-known for treating BPH: the class is known as “5-alpha reductase inhibitors, and the two drugs in the class are Proscar®(generic: finasteride) and Avodart®(generic dutasteride). I have been on one or the other continuously since about this time in 2000 but to support prostate cancer therapy rather than the FDA approved use, which is BPH. (My use was “off label”: legal, but not with FDA approval. I now think I’m cured but am continuing dutasteride as part of my safety net against recurrence.) These drugs normally shrink the prostate by about a third as I recall it. Their main effect is to sharply reduce the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone, and they also reduce blood flow to the prostate.

(I have read the comments on diet with interest. I made radical changes to my diet back in early 2000, shortly after I was diagnosed. For me, the best personal approach was a Mediterranean diet, rather than vegan. I’ve heard very good things about a vegan diet, but it is known to be harder to maintain than a Mediterranean diet. I have had virtually no red meat for almost two decades now, and I have some form of seafood daily, with a lot of plant based food of course. I like the red wine that complements the diet (2 X 4 oz per day, not excessive), and a couple squares of dark chocolate are also nice. For kicks I just checked the search string “benign prostatic hyperplasia AND (diet OR nutrition) “ and got 279 hits; that’s a clear sign of substantial researcher interest in this area.)

Good luck to you and your brother in sorting all this out. He’s fortunate to have your help!

 
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