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  • Prognosis indeterminate: Always?

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    Old 07-02-2013, 07:19 AM   #1
    Montanan
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    Prognosis indeterminate: Always?

    Hi All,
    I asked my husband's radiation oncologist what the prognosis is for someone with his "stats" (PSA, Gleason, positive cores etc) and the best he could tell me was a 3 year study for similar patients who did hormones and external radiation vrs radiation alone. The survival rate at 5 years is significantly higher for those also taking hormones (78% vrs 62%). Those stats were a little shocking I must say. The study did not include those who did brachytherapy (HDRT) in addition to the rest. To me, then it does not apply.
    So, my question is, do you ever really know what the prognosis is? I know that each person is different and it depends on how you do with your treatment regimen but is there a site to see stats that are truly applicable to your situation with all the treatment that is being done? I am trying to decide if I should quit my job.... I just got a leave of absence so that I can go to Utah for a couple months as he does radiation. I believe that my husband is going to retire the end of this year. I like working and the income helps but I do believe we can both quit and be comfortable financially. I don't want to look back and think that we should have played more and worked less.

     
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    Old 07-02-2013, 03:12 PM   #2
    Tall Allen
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    Re: Prognosis indeterminate: Always?

    He's having ADT+HDR+IMRT -- right? The following retrospective study of almost a thousand men showed that the 8-year biochemical failure rate for that combo therapy was only 14% and the 8-yr cancer mortality rate was only 7%. The results look excellent to me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22893254

     
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    Old 07-02-2013, 04:30 PM   #3
    Montanan
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    Re: Prognosis indeterminate: Always?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Tall Allen View Post
    He's having ADT+HDR+IMRT -- right? The following retrospective study of almost a thousand men showed that the 8-year biochemical failure rate for that combo therapy was only 14% and the 8-yr cancer mortality rate was only 7%. The results look excellent to me.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22893254
    I looked at the article and there are so many acronyms that it is hard for me to follow but if you concluded the above results, I believe you and that is so much better than the study quoted to me earlier. And yes, he is doing the three treatment options you mentioned. I agree that the results are excellent. Too bad his doctor didn't know of this study!

     
    Old 07-02-2013, 04:55 PM   #4
    Tall Allen
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    Re: Prognosis indeterminate: Always?

    I've gotten pretty good at reading and translating Medicalese to English. Please feel free to ask if I can translate anything for you.

    Doctors are very busy actually treating people and don't always have the time to keep up. Your doctor would probably appreciate it if you emailed him that link (in a non-accusatory way) -- it might help him provide an answer to the next patient who asks. My doctors (who are medical nerds) love it when I respectfully show them research that they hadn't seen that's been published in a prestigious peer-reviewed journal. In fact they sometimes send me their pre-publication submissions, which I love to read. They probably would find it tiresome, however, if I sent quotes from random internet sources.

     
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