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musicmaker650 01-22-2004 11:51 AM

What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
Cerebral Palsy is a term used to describe a group of chronic conditions affecting body movement and muscle coordination. It is caused by damage to one or more specific areas of the brain, usually occurring during fetal development; before, during, or shortly after birth; or during infancy. Thus, these disorders are not caused by problems in the muscles or nerves. Instead, faulty development or damage to motor areas in the brain disrupt the brain's ability to adequately control movement and posture.

"Cerebral" refers to the brain, and "palsy" to muscle weakness/poor control. Cerebral Palsy itself is not progressive (brain damage does not get worse), but secondary conditions, like muscle spasticity, can develop, and may get better over time, get worse, or remain the same. Cerebral Palsy is not a disease and it should never be confused as being one!

Although Cerebral Palsy is not "curable", in the accepted sense, training, exercise, and therapy can help improve function :)

musicmaker650 01-22-2004 01:12 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
There are 3 catagories of CP

1. Spastic Cerebral Palsy 70% to 80% of CP cases
a) Spastic diplegia- both legs affected (my type :))
b) Left hemi-paresis- Left side affected
c) Right hemi-paresis- Right side affected

2. Athetoid or dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy 10% to 20% of CP cases

3. Ataxic Cerebral Palsy 5% to 10% of CP cases

There can be mixed forms of CP, that can include having more than one, of the forms noted above :o

musicmaker650 01-24-2004 10:34 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=musicmaker650]There are 3 catagories of CP

1. Spastic Cerebral Palsy 70% to 80% of CP cases
a) Spastic diplegia- both legs affected (my type :))
b) Left hemi-paresis- Left side affected
c) Right hemi-paresis- Right side affected

2. Athetoid or dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy 10% to 20% of CP cases

3. Ataxic Cerebral Palsy 5% to 10% of CP cases

There can be mixed forms of CP, that can include having more than one, of the forms noted above :o[/QUOTE]

I went to school with people that had all 3 catagories of CP, and while some had lesser degrees of involvement, I would never use the word "mild" to describe having CP in any form... like so many do on this Board. Just wait till you've lived with in for 50+ years, and see if the word "MILD" comes to your mind. The AB's here don't know any better. We with CP should!

Zagreus 01-25-2004 08:39 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=musicmaker650]I went to school with people that had all 3 catagories of CP, and while some had lesser degrees of involvement, I would never use the word "mild" to describe having CP in any form... like so many do on this Board. Just wait till you've lived with in for 50+ years, and see if the word "MILD" comes to your mind. The AB's here don't know any better. We with CP should![/QUOTE]


You know, I do use the term "mild" when I describe my son, but certainly not so as to diminish the obstacles he faces. But he walks with a limp, has some coordination problems, and some fine motor difficulties with his left hand. He can walk, run, hike, play baseball, basketball, bowl, etc. I know that CP can prevent some people from doing some or all of those things.

He faces a lifetime of obstacles. Trust me, his mother and I are very aware of how hard things are for him, but we are also aware that he can overcome many of those obstacles with love, support, and encouragement.

I don't know a better word to use to try to convey the degree to which the CP affects his motor skills. I think it would be unfair to suggest that we use the word "mild" because we somehow seek to diminish our concern or the condition itself.

Those whose family and loved ones are affected by CP are not as distant from the condition as your post suggests. When you love someone, you suffer with them. My heart breaks everytime my son has to struggle. I may not know CP as he does -- how could I? -- but I'm rejoicing with him every time he overcomes an obstacle and silently shedding tears for him every time he meets obstacles and fears and frustrations. I think you misjudge me for using the term mild.
Tim

musicmaker650 01-25-2004 10:46 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
Hi Tim,

you know you are one of the AB's I am referrig to in my post below... You wish for your son to be less affected by his CP in the future, when you use the term "mild", don't you? I am certainly with you on that one! I KNOW your son will have a happy, fulfilling and prosperous life if you just love him, teach him to love, help him to develop a strong sense of self worth and self esteem and never leave him out of any aspect of your family gatherings or activities, because of his disability :)

Strawberry1 01-25-2004 11:25 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Zagreus]

He faces a lifetime of obstacles. [/QUOTE]

Hmm. Of course, even a mild disability causes obstacles but IMHO you should not pay *too* much attention to them; there are still *lots* of things your son is able to do - a slight disability does *not* turn his life into a tragedy. For example, he may never be able to have a manual job (at least as a career) but there are still many other types of jobs that are possible for him.
Think of all those children who have cancer or schizophrenia etc., or who are sexually abused or suffer from malnutrition. They have much bigger problems than your son has.
*Everybody* has obstacles and frustrations, even without any CP.

musicmaker650 01-25-2004 11:50 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
"*Everybody* has obstacles and frustrations, even without any CP."

That's another point I'd like to get across here too Strawberry1... This Board and not just here in "Cerebral Palsy" seems to have a lot of people asking for help and advise, that don't have a clue what to do with that help or advise once given. We people with CP suffer the same "human" frailties as our AB brothers. With a little luck, our CP teaches us to ignore the "small stuff" and concentrate on the more important things in life. CP can be a real blessing, if you really think about it...

Cymidei Fier 01-26-2004 10:34 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
I have cp on my left side it only affected my left arm and leg but i can walk and use my left arm pretty good.

It took me about 10 years of arm training and pushing weights with my left leg but i am happy with doing stuff.

I am 23 years old and i can do everything that anyone else can do i have a friend that has cp worse then i do and we go out alot and do stuff people look but i don't care i can't let them stop us from having fun.

I do remember when i was little it used to get to me when people made fun of me now it does not even bother me.

musicmaker650 01-26-2004 11:12 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Cymidei Fier]I have cp on my left side it only affected my left arm and leg but i can walk and use my left arm pretty good.

It took me about 10 years of arm training and pushing weights with my left leg but i am happy with doing stuff.

I am 23 years old and i can do everything that anyone else can do i have a friend that has cp worse then i do and we go out alot and do stuff people look but i don't care i can't let them stop us from having fun.

I do remember when i was little it used to get to me when people made fun of me now it does not even bother me.[/QUOTE]

Thanks for posting Cymidei Fier,

so you have Spastic CP, left hemi-paresis :)

No speech problems?

Cymidei Fier 01-26-2004 11:31 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=musicmaker650]Thanks for posting Cymidei Fier,

so you have Spastic CP, left hemi-paresis :)

No speech problems?[/QUOTE]


Yes i have left hemi paresis. I have no speech problems but i do drool now and then when i sleep.

But all in all i would not change anything about me i am happy with myself and that all that matters :)

Strawberry1 01-26-2004 11:55 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Cymidei Fier]Yes i have left hemi paresis. I have no speech problems but i do drool now and then when i sleep.
[/QUOTE]

I think drooling when asleep is perfectly normal, it has nothing to do with CP.

Cymidei Fier 01-26-2004 11:59 AM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Strawberry1]I think drooling when asleep is perfectly normal, it has nothing to do with CP.[/QUOTE]

Only thing i do notice as i get older i seem to be getting more pain on my left side with my leg arm and ribs.

Zagreus 01-26-2004 12:14 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Strawberry1]I think drooling when asleep is perfectly normal, it has nothing to do with CP.[/QUOTE]


You betcha. Now not drooling when you sleep would be unusual! :jester:

musicmaker650 01-26-2004 01:46 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
[QUOTE=Zagreus]You betcha. Now not drooling when you sleep would be unusual! :jester:[/QUOTE]

We all drool, including AB's, in bed more often, when our noses are a little stuffy.

It's nice to have you all posting here. I intend to post as much correct CP info as I can find. I'm an old vetran of Spastic CP-Spastic Diplegia. Born 2 months premature, 2 pounds 4 ounces, June 3, 1950 in Los Angeles, California!

musicmaker650 02-05-2004 12:45 PM

Re: What Is Cerebral Palsy?
 
Some CP Facts:

CP is a serious disorder that causes problems in movement control in more than half a million Americans at an estimated cost of $5 billion a year. Many people with CP suffer additional neurological disabilities, including mental retardation and epilepsy. More than 25 percent of all CP occurs in very low birth weight babies, defined as those born weighing less than 1500 grams, or 3.3 pounds. There are approximately 52,000 very low birth weight babies born each year. Of these, one in 20 who survives infancy has CP.

Although medicine has made striking advances in allowing more preterm babies to survive, some of these children face grievous, lifelong disabilities. We hope the findings from our study will help prevent cerebral palsy in some of these vulnerable infants," said Karin B. Nelson, M.D., acting chief of the NINDS neuroepidemiology branch and lead author of the paper. She added that very low birth weight babies are 100 times more likely to have disabling CP than infants of the most common birth weight (3000-3500 grams).


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