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Severe Pain even after Root Canal


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Old 03-14-2011, 04:05 PM   #1
ahunt52
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Severe Pain even after Root Canal

My dentist discovered severe decay in my tooth #20 two years ago. He did a root canal and it seemed fixed. Then months later, the pain returned-not constant- just flares up a couple of times a day but severe for 15-20 minutes-then goes completely away. he gave me antibiotics and that worked...for a few months , then the pain returned. Most severe after a hard work-out. We sent the x-rays to a couple of other dentists including endodontist. One said extract the tooth! One said re-do the root canal. We re-did the root canal-this time by an endodontist. Pain still there. Again, it only flares up a few times each day but is severe when it does. tried antibiotics again. Didn't work. Endodontist says the root canal is perfect, thinks it could be tooth next to it but there is a metal crown so we can't see under it with x-rays. I am very, very frustrated-hate living like this. What if I extract the tooth and the pain is still there? Should I pull the old crown off? the endodontist and my dentist are completely puzzled and just can't figure out what to do. Can anyone help?

 
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Old 03-14-2011, 04:37 PM   #2
Jack2011
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

Hi I'm sorry for you. I also had a "perfect" root canal that gave me severe pain on and off. Until I finally extracted the tooth and the pain went away, the dentists also thougth it could be the tooth next to it, but I knew that was perfectly healthy. Only you can tell what tooth is the one with the problem. I did pressure very hard the tooth and the ones next to it and I knew what tooth was the one causing the pain. It was the second mollar and I read someplace that you can live very well without the second mollar so I took the decision to pull it off. I had half the pain in two weeks and none after three weeks. I hope this helps. Regards.

 
Old 03-14-2011, 04:53 PM   #3
ahunt52
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

Thanks for the reply-I'm about to choose that option as well-just want to be sure-don't want to lose a tooth if I don't have to. I think I'll have them look under the crown next to the tooth and if it's OK then it's "out with the tooth!"

 
Old 10-19-2011, 11:01 PM   #4
Frankly89
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

Quote:
Originally Posted by ahunt52 View Post
My dentist discovered severe decay in my tooth #20 two years ago. He did a root canal and it seemed fixed. Then months later, the pain returned-not constant- just flares up a couple of times a day but severe for 15-20 minutes-then goes completely away. he gave me antibiotics and that worked...for a few months , then the pain returned. Most severe after a hard work-out. We sent the x-rays to a couple of other dentists including endodontist. One said extract the tooth! One said re-do the root canal. We re-did the root canal-this time by an endodontist. Pain still there. Again, it only flares up a few times each day but is severe when it does. tried antibiotics again. Didn't work. Endodontist says the root canal is perfect, thinks it could be tooth next to it but there is a metal crown so we can't see under it with x-rays. I am very, very frustrated-hate living like this. What if I extract the tooth and the pain is still there? Should I pull the old crown off? the endodontist and my dentist are completely puzzled and just can't figure out what to do. Can anyone help?
It's 100% the tooth with the Crown over it next to it. It happened to me before. Either that or extract the tooth and get a fake one installed. I sometimes wander why the hell do we have nerves in our tooth..

This may sound crazy but i want all my tooth to fall out during sleep and i get a fake set of teeth with no pain AT ALL no brushing my teeth ect.. just replacing them.

 
Old 03-15-2012, 07:59 PM   #5
tj707
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

Quote:
Originally Posted by ahunt52 View Post
Thanks for the reply-I'm about to choose that option as well-just want to be sure-don't want to lose a tooth if I don't have to. I think I'll have them look under the crown next to the tooth and if it's OK then it's "out with the tooth!"
I hope you didn't pull that tooth just yet, and in case you didn't, I wouldn't just yet. I have been told that if you pull a tooth, it may not solve the problem, which you already know, and it will most likely cost more to replace it.

I had a similar problem, but different. I went to a general dentist for a root canal treatment because I didn't think I could afford an endodontist. The general dentist, who did my root canal treatment happened to be the kind who does the old fashioned root canal treatments that are not as good, and can cause severe pain during and after. Of course, after he finished traumatizing me, he took an x-ray, and said it looked good. Soon after the anesthesia wore off, the pain set in. I went back to him, and of course he didn't know what was causing my pain.

After two frustrating weeks, I decided to go see someone else, and try and find out what the problem was. The second dentist told me that the first dentist had done a "reasonably good job," and it probably would have worked for most people, but it didn't work for me. He said that he fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and I needed to have a redo. He also thought the bone was infected. He suggested that I go to an endodontist because this was my best chance of saving the tooth. He also told me if I went to an oral surgeon, he would pull it out, so don't go.

The endodontist said the fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and the canals needed to be cleaned out more, but the bone was not infected. He also said it might be inflammation and infection.

I think that it is very difficult even for doctors to know what is causing a toothache, so they do a lot of guess work.

I went to another endodontist mainly because I didn't want to make the same mistake twice. He told me he wasn't sure what was causing my pain, but after a discussion and evaluation, we decided that it was worth it to redo the treatment, so I had another root canal treatment. He also mentioned that the tooth was very sensitive for a tooth that had had a root canal treatment. The endodontist also had a better x-ray machine than the general dentist, and he found a cavity the general dentist missed. He brought the fillings in the canals down farther, and cleaned them out more.

This time I got antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medicine, and pain medicine. It has gotten a lot better, but I have found that teeth get better in their own time, and inflammation takes a while to clear up. I have also learned that the longer we wait to get the problem taken care of, the longer it is more likely to take for the tooth to get better.

One of the endodontists recommended that I have a cone beam x-ray. He said I would need to go to a dental radiologist for this. With the cone beam x-ray, they might find things that go undetected by regular x-rays like extra canals, that even endodontists miss. It can cost anywhere between $150 to 300 depending on the doctor and the situation, and insurance doesn't pay for it, but if you can swing it, it may be worth it to try.

I probably know more than I need to know about root canal treatments, but I have been told that there are so many things that can be causing dental pain, it's no wonder dentists have to do a lot of guess work. I have been told that it could be: extra canals that have gone undetected, accessory canals that are tiny pieces of nerve that are rarely cleaned out, and filled, and can leave a small amount of nerve tissue, infection still in the tooth, occlusion, APEX violation, traumatized PDL, inflammation, tenderness in the ligament where the injection was given especially if the dentist uses a gun in stead of a syringe to give the injection, overinstrumenting the canal, and/or overfilling the canal which can lead to irritation of the periapical ligament, the tooth may be fractured, terbeculation (whatever that is), left over tissue in the canal that is infected or inflammed, and lesions. Also if the tooth has a crown on it, it is harder for the doctor to see inside, and if you have additional problems like TMD (temporomandupular joint disorder), it can make your pain worse. There may be more reasons than I listed.

It is always worth it to try and save a tooth. Some people don't like to go to the dentist.Some fear root canal treatments, and understandably so.

Last edited by tj707; 03-15-2012 at 08:28 PM.

 
Old 03-15-2012, 09:08 PM   #6
tj707
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

A dentist said that you should avoid hard workouts after root canal treatments because it can cause pain or pain to be worse.

 
Old 08-14-2012, 06:12 PM   #7
tj707
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

I had that second root canal treatment, and I got worse after the medicine ran out. I actually got those antibiotics and pain meds from the ER. I continued to get worse, so I had to go to an oral surgeon to have it extracted because the tooth was making me so sick, I thought I would die. I asked the doctor to take off the crown to see what was underneath. He told me that my tooth was decayed underneath the crown, and probably was all along. That is why I got worse each time in stead of better. I don't know at what point doctors started giving root canal treatments through the crown as opposed to taking the crown off. I did read one doctor said it is not a good idea to do a root canal treatment without taking off the crown because the docotor can't see as well. Each time they explained how they were going to drill a hole in my crown, I thought it didn't sound right, but I figured they knew what they were talking about. Also my crown was more than fifteen years old. They just kept telling me what a nice crown it was, despite the fact I had told them that the crown was a foodtrap, and it was very sore. Now my tooth has been extracted for over one month, and it still hurts, probably because I waited too long, and nobody warned me to hurry and take the sick tooth out. Now I have to find out why it still hurts. I also got to worry about the other cavity they all missed. I may need oral surgery. One of the general dentists I saw told me not to go to an oral surgeon because he would take the tooth our, but an endodontist would try to safe the tooth. This was definitely one of those times when it was better to go to an oral surgeon especially because the endodontists did not know what they were doing, and they did not know whant was causing my pain. They were just guessing. When complications set in, they did not know what to do.





Quote:
Originally Posted by tj707 View Post
I hope you didn't pull that tooth just yet, and in case you didn't, I wouldn't just yet. I have been told that if you pull a tooth, it may not solve the problem, which you already know, and it will most likely cost more to replace it.

I had a similar problem, but different. I went to a general dentist for a root canal treatment because I didn't think I could afford an endodontist. The general dentist, who did my root canal treatment happened to be the kind who does the old fashioned root canal treatments that are not as good, and can cause severe pain during and after. Of course, after he finished traumatizing me, he took an x-ray, and said it looked good. Soon after the anesthesia wore off, the pain set in. I went back to him, and of course he didn't know what was causing my pain.

After two frustrating weeks, I decided to go see someone else, and try and find out what the problem was. The second dentist told me that the first dentist had done a "reasonably good job," and it probably would have worked for most people, but it didn't work for me. He said that he fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and I needed to have a redo. He also thought the bone was infected. He suggested that I go to an endodontist because this was my best chance of saving the tooth. He also told me if I went to an oral surgeon, he would pull it out, so don't go.

The endodontist said the fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and the canals needed to be cleaned out more, but the bone was not infected. He also said it might be inflammation and infection.

I think that it is very difficult even for doctors to know what is causing a toothache, so they do a lot of guess work.

I went to another endodontist mainly because I didn't want to make the same mistake twice. He told me he wasn't sure what was causing my pain, but after a discussion and evaluation, we decided that it was worth it to redo the treatment, so I had another root canal treatment. He also mentioned that the tooth was very sensitive for a tooth that had had a root canal treatment. The endodontist also had a better x-ray machine than the general dentist, and he found a cavity the general dentist missed. He brought the fillings in the canals down farther, and cleaned them out more.

This time I got antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medicine, and pain medicine. It has gotten a lot better, but I have found that teeth get better in their own time, and inflammation takes a while to clear up. I have also learned that the longer we wait to get the problem taken care of, the longer it is more likely to take for the tooth to get better.

One of the endodontists recommended that I have a cone beam x-ray. He said I would need to go to a dental radiologist for this. With the cone beam x-ray, they might find things that go undetected by regular x-rays like extra canals, that even endodontists miss. It can cost anywhere between $150 to 300 depending on the doctor and the situation, and insurance doesn't pay for it, but if you can swing it, it may be worth it to try.

I probably know more than I need to know about root canal treatments, but I have been told that there are so many things that can be causing dental pain, it's no wonder dentists have to do a lot of guess work. I have been told that it could be: extra canals that have gone undetected, accessory canals that are tiny pieces of nerve that are rarely cleaned out, and filled, and can leave a small amount of nerve tissue, infection still in the tooth, occlusion, APEX violation, traumatized PDL, inflammation, tenderness in the ligament where the injection was given especially if the dentist uses a gun in stead of a syringe to give the injection, overinstrumenting the canal, and/or overfilling the canal which can lead to irritation of the periapical ligament, the tooth may be fractured, terbeculation (whatever that is), left over tissue in the canal that is infected or inflammed, and lesions. Also if the tooth has a crown on it, it is harder for the doctor to see inside, and if you have additional problems like TMD (temporomandupular joint disorder), it can make your pain worse. There may be more reasons than I listed.

It is always worth it to try and save a tooth. Some people don't like to go to the dentist.Some fear root canal treatments, and understandably so.

 
Old 08-14-2012, 06:40 PM   #8
tj707
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Re: Severe Pain even after Root Canal

I have to take back what I said before. My tooth was decayed under the crown but none of the doctors thought of looking under it, even after I had asked on of them if he could take the crown off and fix it because it had become a foodtrap. He said that wasn't the proper way to fix a crown, but if he had taken it off to look, he would have seen that it was decayed. The crown was over 15 years old, and a foodtrap. This should have told them something.



Quote:
Originally Posted by tj707 View Post
I hope you didn't pull that tooth just yet, and in case you didn't, I wouldn't just yet. I have been told that if you pull a tooth, it may not solve the problem, which you already know, and it will most likely cost more to replace it.

I had a similar problem, but different. I went to a general dentist for a root canal treatment because I didn't think I could afford an endodontist. The general dentist, who did my root canal treatment happened to be the kind who does the old fashioned root canal treatments that are not as good, and can cause severe pain during and after. Of course, after he finished traumatizing me, he took an x-ray, and said it looked good. Soon after the anesthesia wore off, the pain set in. I went back to him, and of course he didn't know what was causing my pain.

After two frustrating weeks, I decided to go see someone else, and try and find out what the problem was. The second dentist told me that the first dentist had done a "reasonably good job," and it probably would have worked for most people, but it didn't work for me. He said that he fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and I needed to have a redo. He also thought the bone was infected. He suggested that I go to an endodontist because this was my best chance of saving the tooth. He also told me if I went to an oral surgeon, he would pull it out, so don't go.

The endodontist said the fillings in the canals did not go down far enough, and the canals needed to be cleaned out more, but the bone was not infected. He also said it might be inflammation and infection.

I think that it is very difficult even for doctors to know what is causing a toothache, so they do a lot of guess work.

I went to another endodontist mainly because I didn't want to make the same mistake twice. He told me he wasn't sure what was causing my pain, but after a discussion and evaluation, we decided that it was worth it to redo the treatment, so I had another root canal treatment. He also mentioned that the tooth was very sensitive for a tooth that had had a root canal treatment. The endodontist also had a better x-ray machine than the general dentist, and he found a cavity the general dentist missed. He brought the fillings in the canals down farther, and cleaned them out more.

This time I got antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medicine, and pain medicine. It has gotten a lot better, but I have found that teeth get better in their own time, and inflammation takes a while to clear up. I have also learned that the longer we wait to get the problem taken care of, the longer it is more likely to take for the tooth to get better.

One of the endodontists recommended that I have a cone beam x-ray. He said I would need to go to a dental radiologist for this. With the cone beam x-ray, they might find things that go undetected by regular x-rays like extra canals, that even endodontists miss. It can cost anywhere between $150 to 300 depending on the doctor and the situation, and insurance doesn't pay for it, but if you can swing it, it may be worth it to try.

I probably know more than I need to know about root canal treatments, but I have been told that there are so many things that can be causing dental pain, it's no wonder dentists have to do a lot of guess work. I have been told that it could be: extra canals that have gone undetected, accessory canals that are tiny pieces of nerve that are rarely cleaned out, and filled, and can leave a small amount of nerve tissue, infection still in the tooth, occlusion, APEX violation, traumatized PDL, inflammation, tenderness in the ligament where the injection was given especially if the dentist uses a gun in stead of a syringe to give the injection, overinstrumenting the canal, and/or overfilling the canal which can lead to irritation of the periapical ligament, the tooth may be fractured, terbeculation (whatever that is), left over tissue in the canal that is infected or inflammed, and lesions. Also if the tooth has a crown on it, it is harder for the doctor to see inside, and if you have additional problems like TMD (temporomandupular joint disorder), it can make your pain worse. There may be more reasons than I listed.

It is always worth it to try and save a tooth. Some people don't like to go to the dentist.Some fear root canal treatments, and understandably so.

 
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