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    Old 04-04-2003, 03:51 AM   #1
    lowbatt65
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    Unhappy Feel hungry shortly after eating - need some advice

    Hello everyone.

    For several months I have been experiencing an extremely irritating sensation after eating. I can eat a reasonably large meal and yet within 60-90 minutes I can feel hungry again. It doesn't happen every time, but probably 1 in every 3 meals at least.

    In september last year I started a diet and by december I had lost 18 lbs. I then had a cycling accident and my diet went out of the window and I went back to my typical dietary habits. The feeling of hunger started around february and has continued ever since.

    I've spoken to my GP who has no real advice for me. I'd be interested in any thoughts/advice, privately if preferred. I'm happy to go into greater detail about my usual dietary habits if that would help.

    It is really starting to bother me now, and this is the first time I've ever posted on this sort of forum. Thanks for reading.

    ps I'm male and 37 years old.

     
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    Old 04-04-2003, 04:18 AM   #2
    Omskakas
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    What kind of meals you eat?

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 04:50 AM   #3
    lowbatt65
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    I have a reasonably mixed diet. I eat meat and fish but not that much of either. I try to watch the amount of fat I eat so no frying, and very little cheese. I also eat quite a lot of pasta, vegetables, bread, salad and a fair amount of fruit. I also like spicy food a lot.

    My main weakness is chocolate which I could eat in large quantities if I was given half a chance! But I try not to.

    I hope this has given you a better idea of my diet.

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 05:54 AM   #4
    hunter44
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    You are having carb withdrawals caused by high insulin spikes. Read up on how carbs effect your metabolism in Biochemistry 101.. Adding good fats to you diet is not only essential but also leaves you with a satiated feeling. [url="http://nasw.org/mem-maint/awards/01Taubesarticle1.html"]http://nasw.org/mem-maint/awards/01Taubesarticle1.html[/url] [url="http://www.buffalo.***/news/fast-execute.cgi/article-page.html?article=30850009"]http://www.buffalo.***/news/fast-execute.cgi/article-page.html?article=30850009[/url]

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 06:43 AM   #5
    auntjudyg
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    Rachel and Richard Heller's Carbohydrate Addicts Lifespan Plan might offer some insight.

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 07:13 AM   #6
    lowbatt65
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    I've been doing a bit more research and came across this "..Anyone with diabetes, heart, or kidney problems should not follow a diet that promotes the formation of ketones, including the Atkins plan"

    Although I don't know a great deal about this, am I right in saying I would be better switching to a low carb diet? Unfortunately, I do have an ongoing kidney problem and if the above statement is true, I should avoid a low carb diet.

    Nonetheless, should I try to cut down the amount of carbs at meal times and increase protein, and even fats?

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 09:26 AM   #7
    auntjudyg
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    There are many low-carb plans, only a couple of which aim at producing the state of ketosis.

    Most of the others aim at avoiding so-called insulin spikes (the book Protein Power probably has the best write-up about insulin). They are structured a little differently (spreading carbs throughout the day; or having most carbs at one meal; or only eating carbs that are very low on the glycemic index).

    If you decide to take the low-carb route, it would be best for you to look through the basic plan of several plans and see which makes sense to you and which is sustainable.

    One thing in common with all the plans is that they will recommend eliminating as much as possible refined carbohydrates. Personally, I find it helpful to get a hefty portion of protein at every meal (3 meals a day). I aim at a MINIMUM of 15 grams, but I'm female and older than you are, so for you it would probably be good to shout for 20-25. You can kind of see for yourself, I just find this really stabilizes eating/craving/binging.

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 09:47 AM   #8
    ramsemonius
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    I think you should eat if you are hungry, as a rule, with some conditions: whole food-based diet (no refined flour products. At least 5 servings of fruits and veggies, with some veggies cooked. Base the amount of grain foods and other starchy foods you eat on your overall physical activity levels. If you look at the big picture, the two leading culprits for poor health are lack of physical activity and lack of fruits and vegetables, at least in the U.S. Please let me know if would like specific recommendations on foods to eat. Good luck!

    Mr. Rams

     
    Old 04-04-2003, 10:09 AM   #9
    Rixtar
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    [QUOTE]Originally posted by lowbatt65:
    [B]Hello everyone.

    For several months I have been experiencing an extremely irritating sensation after eating. I can eat a reasonably large meal and yet within 60-90 minutes I can feel hungry again. It doesn't happen every time, but probably 1 in every 3 meals at least.

    I agree with the conclusion that you are experiencing insulin spikes. I have experienced this also. As someone who was once obese, I can offer several natural alternatives that will help you to avoid these post-meal cravings.

    The first is Chromium Picolinate. Take one 500mcg tablet a half-hour before or with each meal. I have tried takin all 1500mcg at once that may work for you also.

    The second is an herb from India. It is Gymnema Sylvestre (pronounced ge min ah cell ves tree) this has been used for centuries in India as a treatment for diabetes. This works to balance blood sugar levels.

    Now I must address some of the other replies in this stream - Read on...

    Unless your doctor tells you to go on a low carb diet -don't. And if he/she does find out exactly what he si selling.

    All of the promoters of low-carb or no-carb dieting use the "you are going to become diabetic" threat almost like a recruiter in a cult. The low-carb diet is the single biggest economic success in recent history.

    Carbs are not evil.

    In a study conducted two years ago and published in either Better Nutrition or Taste for Life, a survey of individuals who had lost weight and managed to maintain the weight loss found that they all ate high carb diets to maintain their weight loss. (I have looked for the magazine but I can't find it sorry.)

    The reason is simple. Most of us who are or were overweight are volume eaters. We eat a lot. There are rare cases of inidividuals that really don't and still have an obesity problem but those are RARE CASES.

    When you eat carbohydrates like whole grains, cereals and complex carbohydrates you get volume (mass) and feel fuller you consume less calories and provide energy to the body. Protein is not a source of energy. Fat is a source of energy but it contains more than twice the amount of calories per gram as carbohydrates so you can eat more food if it is low in fat and volume eaters like me always want more food.

    When you use a low-carb diet to loose weight you are changing the basic processes within the body. Your body will rebound the minute you go off the diet.

    I have counciled many individuals during the weight loss process and aftewards. I also remember the day my cardiologist told me that "Now that you have lost the weight you know you can never eat they way other people eat for the rest of your life" I was heartbroken and distraught. My dietician said that he was a surgeion and not very good with paitents and she went on to tell me what he meant. He was trying to tell me that I had to eat better to live longer, to make the smart food choices that most people don't make. So if I sound harsh I apologize in advance. I learned from my cardiologist. It was my dietician that encourgaed me to make weight management a career. So I speak from experience and training.

    The bottom line with low-carb diets is that unless you are willing to consume those types of foods for the rest of you life, don't do it.

    Your rate of success will be much better on a balanced low-fat diet that consists of no more than 60% of the calories necessary to maintain your desired body weight. I measure success on a scale and the measurement is taken one year after you end the weight loss program. If you have maintained 70% of your weight loss you are a success. If after a year you have gained more than 30% or your weight lost back you need to check you actions.

    Once you get to your desired body weight it is easier to maintain it by continuing a balanced low-fat diet that consists of the calories necessary to maintain your ideal body weight.

    One last thought - the three most important helpful hints I have ever come across with regards to dieting

    1. Remove any food product from your home that does not support your chosed weight loss program. If you are going to cheat get out of the house and go find the food you will cheat with. This gives you the time to think about your actions.

    2. Have a least one calorie deficit day per week. Pick one day and consume only half of what you normally would either on your weight program or your maintenance program.

    3. Write down everything you put in your mouth. Every piece of donut at the office, every sample from the deli, everything you are 100% accountable for your actions. It is up to you.


     
    Old 04-04-2003, 02:12 PM   #10
    auntjudyg
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    Rixtar,

    Our experiences with low-carb regimes are quite different. Could you answer a couple of questions because somehow we are getting very different information about the matter, so I must have missed something.

    Who, precisely, are "all of the promoters" of low-carb dieting who use the "you are going to become diabetic" threat? I thought I had read something about at least half the major promoters, and this is the first time I am hearing this threat.

    Who is promoting a "no-carb" plan? That also is new to me.

    Did you realize that the books for many low-carb plans can be found in the library and that most of them (actually, all of the ones I know about) only require regular type foods you get in the grocery store? I realize much money is being made on low-carb food items, but they are not required at all to follow a low-carb regime.

    Who is saying the carbs are evil? Even Atkins doesn't say carbs are evil.

    This and the weight loss board are full of citations of studies demonstrating this and that, plus counter-arguments, so I don't think anymore needs to be said there.

    And for me, your explanation about volume eating does not ring true at all. It sounds like Dean Ornish's view, the same line we have been hearing for decades. Yeah, it worked for some people, but somehow much of the population keeps getting fatter and fatter. Thank goodness, some researchers thought there was something wrong with all that and found other explanations!

    Could you tell me something about the changes in basic processes within the body that take place on a low-carb diet?

    Then you seem to be condemning low-carb plans saying you will rebound the minute you go off the diet. Then you go on to say that you yourself came to the realization that you would have to change your eating habits for life. So, there is something wrong with that when it involves a low-carb plan, but in your case it is okay? Of course you are going for a life time change. Do you know of any diet where you do not rebound if you go off of it?

    You talk about having to eat "those types of foods" for the rest of your life. Exactly what types of foods are these?

     
    Old 04-18-2003, 10:43 AM   #11
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    Rixtar, you said to have a least one calorie deficit day per week. Pick one day and consume only half of what you normally would either on your weight program or your maintenance program.

    Does this mean that I should only have 600 calories one day out of the week. I currently take in about 1200 to 1500 calories a day and wanted to make sure I understood this correctly. And if so, how does that help? I really am curious because people are telling me I can not go lower than 1200 even.

     
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