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  • Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

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    Old 06-30-2006, 08:28 PM   #16
    tamara29
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    I'm sorry to butt in here, but I have a question. What age did this start and are your children this way with just you or everyone? I have a three year old daughter, who's father is BP. Lately, she has been terrible, especially when she's sleepy. She had a 20 minute tantrum tonight, hitting me, scratching me and biting me. This has only been going on for the last month or so, and it's usually only me that she does it to. She does fuss and fight with the other children at the babysitters, but no more than normal. She doesn't do this with any other authority figure, either. My DH can tell her to stay in time out, and she will but for me, she won't do it. She'll also listen to the babysitter.

    She starts preschool in August, and I'm scared that she might do this to one of the teachers there, even though she doesn't do this to other authority figures, yet. I talked about it my therapist (I'm being seen for depression), and she seems to think that it's normal behavior, that Tessa knows I'll love her no matter what, so she feels comfortable doing it. We also talked it over with DH's psychiatrist, and he also feels that it's normal behavior. But, I still can't help but be worried.

     
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    Old 06-30-2006, 08:41 PM   #17
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Mental illness is not selective about when it wants to come out. To me it sounds like she just needs love and attention from you. Some kids require a lot more patients than othe kids. Try to stay calm and wait it out. I wouldn't be too worried yet, but it is always good to be observant.

     
    Old 06-30-2006, 08:46 PM   #18
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by gotitbad
    Mental illness is not selective about when it wants to come out. To me it sounds like she just needs love and attention from you. Some kids require a lot more patients than othe kids. Try to stay calm and wait it out. I wouldn't be too worried yet, but it is always good to be observant.
    She gets ton of one on one attention from me. At night, it's just she and I, so all of my attention is focused on her until bedtime. In fact, I've been told I'm overly attentive. Could that be the problem? She is very attached to me, more so than to anyone else. I'm going to not to worry, but like you said, I am going to observant.

     
    Old 06-30-2006, 09:46 PM   #19
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    As a person who is working on a mental health degree and who works in a mental health area I just want to suggest that you becareful with the medications you give your child. They are chemicals that will be pumping threw your child's blood stream and circulatory system. Do research on the medications that they are offering to your child and read up on all the adverse effects, side effects and long term effects and benefits from the medication. If you feel worried then go with that and be cautious. Go with your mother's intuition ok. Remember pharmacological therapy is a huge business and will market drugs that may not be safe for your kid. A part of your kid's problem may be a chemical imbalance but there is no telling right now. I always believe in second and third opinions, sometimes I get a fourth opinion if still have that intuition that something just isn't right. And if Therapist's say this is normal blah blah blah and they do not tell you how to fix the problem then dig deeper. Ask questions, set goals, be assertive and take notes. Use these educated people to get ideas and information.

    I need to disagree with one of the persons on here who said that You did nothing to cause the bad behavior. Well you may be accidently reinforcing the wrong behavior and you are not a bad person for doing it. IT happens all the time. THat is why a good behavior analyst or even a good psychologist would help sift out with a functional assessment what is maintaining this problem behavior in the child's environment. But here is the bottom line for now: You are short on money to help your child. Be careful with this free help you are getting. If his behavior is getting worse and violent you should know then that the intervention needs to be altered or stopped. The best things you can do now is to read up on psychology Text books. You've got to educate yourself. The best way is too go to a university library and start checking out books there or at your public library. Also there is tons of online information about Applied Behavior Analysis Therapy and Cognitive Therapy. Also have faith in God or a higher being that that entity will be there for you and help you work things out. You are doing your best. Also I think self affirmation CDs are good for kids. Basic positive self messages played on a cd system can help a child replace his negative thoughts and feel good. Watching comedies, cartoons, and doing silly and fun stuff with the kids may be a challenge but it is a start at doing something behavioral in the opposite end of this mood spectrum. Also give yourself credit and reward yourself when ever you are doing a good job. I find a CD called Creative Visualization helps me to move on from set backs and look foward to the next day. Creative visualization is a great way of keeping a very positive and realistic way of thinking. I usually suggest creative visualization for Adults and Young Adults not for younger kids because it is slightly complex even though the main idea is so positive and very encouraging but I think you might feel encouraged by it and maybe your son would benefit from it, who knows. I hope this helps. Keep me up to date.

    Last edited by strongernow; 06-30-2006 at 10:07 PM.

     
    Old 06-30-2006, 09:55 PM   #20
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Tamara: It could be seperation anxiety. Start validating the child whenever she does something on her own. Make a big deal about it and get excited when the child does certain things that are independent - no matter how little the behavior is. Empathic reflections and listening are important too. I think there is online information on how to do empathic reflections and empathic listening. Carl Rogers, Virginia Axline, and Garry Landreth are the experts in Empathic communications. You could do an online search on those scholars. I think an online search would help you out so much because believe me I've been to several therapists myself to work on my issues and they never tell you an intellectual thing that could help you solve your problems. They just sit in their chairs and listen to me drone on and on and it really doesn't do a thing. That is why I stopped therapy and have been so much more content than ever before. Although I am not saying all therapists are bad, some are good and will inform and educate you, some will treat you as if you are a fool and will always be a fool. So I am giving you this data that not many people ever get to have. Remember the advice you read about empathic reflections and empathic listening is not mine but from decades of research, analysis and results conducted from those three legendary Psychologists.

    Last edited by strongernow; 06-30-2006 at 10:12 PM.

     
    Old 07-01-2006, 09:22 AM   #21
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    That's not necessarily true that mental illness isn't selective about when it shows itself. I can control my Asperger's outbursts when I'm around people other than my family, and people with OCD, of which I am one, are notorious for hiding their compulsions and symptoms because they feel embarrassed.
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    Last edited by GatsbyLuvr1920; 07-01-2006 at 09:24 AM.

     
    Old 07-01-2006, 01:11 PM   #22
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by GatsbyLuvr1920
    That's not necessarily true that mental illness isn't selective about when it shows itself. I can control my Asperger's outbursts when I'm around people other than my family, and people with OCD, of which I am one, are notorious for hiding their compulsions and symptoms because they feel embarrassed.
    -GatsbyLuvr1920-
    My thought is,if you can control your Asperger's oustburts and at times OCD, because you may feel embarrassed; What would be the possibility that over each time, as you age, you "learn by doing" to control most all of yours symptoms ?

    I would invite your comments on my most reasent Thread "Can Age be a Positive Factor in Dealing with Bipolar Episodes?"

    Eyes

     
    Old 07-01-2006, 07:38 PM   #23
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Gatsby--You are also an adult, not a 5 year old child. Do you think you could control your emotions and behaviors when you were that age? Also, there are a lot of people who are afraid of giving medication to children. I was always way more afraid of what these illnesses were doing to them in terms of infringing on their ability to learn, communicate, have social interation, feel good about themselves, and be safe. Some of this depends of the severity of the illness and every child is different. Ironically, my father is a renoun Psychiatrist and has seen incredible success with psychiatric medication in children in his 40 years of practice. I guess that is why I wasn't as afraid as most people would be to give it a try. Don't forget, you are not talking about putting your kid on a drug for a lifetime, but just a trial of a month or two. If it doesn't help you just stop it. If it does you may only need it for months or a few years. Just take one step at a time and try to get the child stable. That was my approach.

     
    Old 07-02-2006, 10:31 AM   #24
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    That is true about the medications can be only for a trial period but I've known of some psychiatrists who will push you to increase the meds even if it makes you feel worse.

     
    Old 07-02-2006, 02:47 PM   #25
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    The key is to find an excellent child psychiatrist. Since I live in a big city, there are many choices. It took me 3 until I found one that I felt understood my kids and was extremely concerned with them and receptive to me. I spoke to him almost daily by phone for months until we had them more stable on meds. He only billed me for in person sessions, not phone time. I don't think this kind of care is easy to find, but you definitely need to be persistant with whoever you are seeing to have them keep close track of how the meds are affecting your child and make changes quickly if needeed. You should never be made to feel afraid to call them with any questions or concerns, and they should call you back that same day.

     
    Old 07-02-2006, 04:03 PM   #26
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    I agree with gotitbad.

     
    Old 07-03-2006, 09:11 PM   #27
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Well, I thought a lot about what strongernow said about it possibly being something I am doing that could be causing it, which I have been trying to be aware of all along.. I have tried different discipline techniques which got me nowhere..Listening to other peoples advice,etc...No matter how many consequences my son got for making bad choices, he never learned from them, he did the same things over and over as if he didnt get it.... Now that I got validation from the DR and the RX... I am questioning whether he can't control it vs. he won't control it. I have to at least try something else different before giving him meds that they want to give him for a minimum of 6to 8 months. Besides, I am not convinced that meds will "fix" him, all the parents of teenagers I know that have been on all these meds for 7-10 yrs, still have problems and yet have had to increase, and have side effects,etc. If there are kids out there that have actually only needed the drugs for less than a year and got better, I would like to hear from them... PLEASE.

    I am taking strongernow's advice on checking into the play therapy, cognitive therapy and possibly even psychotherapy in addition to positive parenting to get to the root of what he is so angry about. I am looking at it like he is angry and confused which may cause him to be unable to focus, calm & control, so at times he is defiant and moody etc. This weekend I took a different approach, where I would show him what he looked like when he acted a certain way, ask him what he is angry about, tell him I understand and its okay to feel that way...etc. Whenever we are around other people there is always the constant pressure and badgering from them to "correct" him, and not let him get away with that, etc... So maybe I was TOO firm and strict for this boy, considering the psychological problems he is having.. it may be making him worse... We have been on a rollercoaster for so long, and I won't know which is the right approach yet, since when it comes to discipline the key is supposed to be consistency... I may have been consistently wrong.. Also, does anyone have experience or knowledge of amino acids and how they affect the neurotransmitters in the brain?
    Thanks so much for all of your input !
    Michele

     
    Old 07-05-2006, 08:34 PM   #28
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    If you haven't read the book "The Bipolar Child", it is an absolute must read! It will give you everything you need to know and how to deal with this illness.

     
    Old 07-06-2006, 08:19 AM   #29
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Thanks Got It Bad.. and I dont know who I am fooling myself I guess thinking that I can "fix" my son. He's been in therapy, he is in a hospital program, and the behavioral specialist came to the house yesterday and my son is so hyper, inattentive and impulsive most of the time that no matter how "strong" I am, I see he needs further help. I am having major anxiety and now panic attacks over this and I have prayed to god to accept things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can and the wisdom to know the difference. I believe I got my answer, I now have the wisdom to know the difference and have accepted that I cannot change my son. I can help him, teach him and parent him. But it is humanly impossible to change him. So, I stayed up all night on the internet looking up research studies on Metadate CD, which has promising results.. I am going to give it a try.. only then do I believe that I can start to help him when he is focused. I will have to monitor him closely ofcourse for side effects. His father went untreated as a a child with ADHD and it progressed into Bipolar and Borderline Personality disorder, as the studies indicate as well. I am optimistic after my research that with the meds, therapy and positive parenting my son can come off the meds within a year and have a better life.
    Thanks so much!
    Michele

     
    Old 07-06-2006, 09:58 AM   #30
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    Re: Pediatric Bipolar (5 year old)

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mattsmom105
    His father went untreated as a a child with ADHD and it progressed into Bipolar and Borderline Personality disorder, as the studies indicate as well.
    Actually, his father probably didn't have ADHD at all. Many people who develop bipolar disorder later on in life show early symptoms as a child, symptoms that look like ADHD. However, it's usually not ADHD, but a sign of early, developing bipolar disorder. Yes, a person can have both ADHD and bipolar disorder, but usually, if the bipolar person had ADHD-like symptoms as a child, or even was diagnosed as having ADHD, it most likely was a sign of what was to come.
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