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    Old 01-15-2015, 09:01 AM   #1
    kartney
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    hyprocure

    Hi everyone,
    I am preparing for the hyropcure surgery. I am 25 years old. I have had orthotics for 15 years. At that time I was told there was nothing anyone could do/no surgery that would ever fix my feet. I am a nurse. I was told my one doctor that I would never be able to work as a nurse as I was born with "secretary" feet. But, here I am.

    I had my first appt with my podiatrist last week. He is recommending the Hyprocure procedure on both feet at different times. I have researched this procedure a million times and I am so excited that there actually is something out there that could fix my problem. He is confident that my left foot will be successful. However, he does not think the right foot will hold up and I will need to have a reconstructive surgery within a year after the implant. However, he is going to try hyprocure first as it will not "burn any bridges to try". He ranked my feet an 8/10 on a severity scale.

    I have a few questions for anyone going through this process too:

    1. I am in the planning stages. I am waiting for my insurance (health alliance) to approve a foot and ankle MRI. Did anyone else have one? They said it will take 4 hours! Was this the same for other people? How long did it take for the MRI to be approved? They are anticipating at least a week. He is anticipating he will need to repair tendons. Did anyone else have tendons repaired while having the hyprocure? Did this slow down your recovery period? He said it could add another two weeks of recovery times.

    2. I also have to have a genetic blood test to rule out Marfan Syndrome. My podiatrist had me do some joint flexibility tests and was concerned about how flexible my thumbs, knees, and ankles seemed to be. Anyone else have to have this blood test too? I am familiar with Marfan's and personally don't think I fit the criteria.

    3. As a nurse, I am obviously on my feet 75%+ of the time. Does anyone else have a similar job? How long were you off of work? Is going back to work within a couple of weeks doable?

    4. Any one have a high severity rating? Did this change your recovery time? Did the hyprocure procedure alone work to correct your feet? Did anyone have to have the second, more complex surgery afterwards?

    5. How much did insurance cover? What should I expect to pay myself? Was physical therapy required?

    Just looking for any and all advice.
    Thanks everyone!

     
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    Old 01-15-2015, 01:32 PM   #2
    danabarb
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    Re: hyprocure

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by mckartney View Post
    Hi everyone,
    I am preparing for the hyropcure surgery. I am 25 years old. I have had orthotics for 15 years. At that time I was told there was nothing anyone could do/no surgery that would ever fix my feet. I am a nurse. I was told my one doctor that I would never be able to work as a nurse as I was born with "secretary" feet. But, here I am.

    I had my first appt with my podiatrist last week. He is recommending the Hyprocure procedure on both feet at different times. I have researched this procedure a million times and I am so excited that there actually is something out there that could fix my problem. He is confident that my left foot will be successful. However, he does not think the right foot will hold up and I will need to have a reconstructive surgery within a year after the implant. However, he is going to try hyprocure first as it will not "burn any bridges to try". He ranked my feet an 8/10 on a severity scale.

    I speak from experience and am a lot older than you are: Orthotics are HORRIBLE for your feet because all they do is weaken the tendons and muscles in the feet, which, in turn, weaken the legs and hips . I had horrible bunions and hammer toes and .and had a surgeon "correct" this problem many, may years ago. After the surgery, I wore orthotics for years and I mean years. Guess what? One bunion started to return and one toe was going crazy. Had I known years ago what I have learned over the last few years, I never would have let the surgeon cut into me. I I found myself a man who majored in body mechanics and he has done wonders for me. I NEVER had an arch and my ankles were so weak that I could not skate or ski when younger. This man has given me beautiful arches, straightened out my toes and made my ankles and whole body stronger. If you still plan on having surgery, after reading my letter, please do me a favor and get into the hands of a good orthopedic surgeon because they are much more qualified to cut into the feet. You can get yourself into some good physical therapy as well as join a yoga class and look up strengthening exercises on the Internet. There are toe separators sold that will loosen up those tendons. I just recently told someone about them, the person has used them and seen an improvement. I use mine every night. When the man who has been working on me, first saw me, my toes were almost glued together due to the misalignment. They now have nice spaces between them. If you do get into yoga and do some strengthening exercises, it will take time, but, at least, you will have good feet and ankles. A theraband will help as well as a slant board. I have dealt with podiatrists and found they were very, very eager to have orthotics made for me and licking their fingers to book me for surgery!!! Fell free to ask me any questions.


    I have a few questions for anyone going through this process too:

    1. I am in the planning stages. I am waiting for my insurance (health alliance) to approve a foot and ankle MRI. Did anyone else have one? They said it will take 4 hours! Was this the same for other people? How long did it take for the MRI to be approved? They are anticipating at least a week. He is anticipating he will need to repair tendons. Did anyone else have tendons repaired while having the hyprocure? Did this slow down your recovery period? He said it could add another two weeks of recovery times.

    2. I also have to have a genetic blood test to rule out Marfan Syndrome. My podiatrist had me do some joint flexibility tests and was concerned about how flexible my thumbs, knees, and ankles seemed to be. Anyone else have to have this blood test too? I am familiar with Marfan's and personally don't think I fit the criteria.

    3. As a nurse, I am obviously on my feet 75%+ of the time. Does anyone else have a similar job? How long were you off of work? Is going back to work within a couple of weeks doable?

    4. Any one have a high severity rating? Did this change your recovery time? Did the hyprocure procedure alone work to correct your feet? Did anyone have to have the second, more complex surgery afterwards?

    5. How much did insurance cover? What should I expect to pay myself? Was physical therapy required?

    Just looking for any and all advice.
    Thanks everyone!

     
    Old 01-15-2015, 02:15 PM   #3
    JustMeJen
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    Re: hyprocure

    I have had foot/ankle MRIs. I think the 4 hours is about what it took since they do each foot separately. With one of mine they had trouble getting a few views and had to repeat a couple of times because they were pushing my ankle with torn ligaments and tendons into a position that caused muscle spasms. Mostly it was boring; the position makes it hard to read so bring an ipod and a book but be prepared to have trouble reading (I thought that I could have been positioned more comfortably but didn't ask).

    Before surgery it would be a good idea to see a foot/ankle certified orthopedist. Podiatrists aren't always are expert at surgery as they could be and there are plenty of people on here who have had bad experiences and very few who will say they used a podiatrist and would recommend t. In my own case I was perfectly willing to let my podiatrist do my surgery but due to medical complications it needed to be done at a big hospital where he didn't have privileges. And that turned out to be a very good thing because he was very focused on my torn ligaments but hadn't noticed my torn tendons or that my joint was full of debris that needed a scope to remove it. If he had done my surgery I would have recovered, realized my ankle was still unstable and painful and wound up seeing the foot/ankle ortho and having to have another procedure with prolonged healing all over again. The way it worked out the foot/ankle ortho did all 3 procedures the same day and 7 months later I'm healed up and just working on improving balance and my ankle's ability to handle stressful situations (like fatigue).

    My podiatrist did some really good things for me. He diagnosed the ankle instability and found the ligament tears and tendon tears after a severe sprain that had not been diagnosed well. He figured out why my feet hurt so badly after that injury and treated it with several things, including orthotics which have prevented injuries and kept my arches from falling further than they already had. He found the old fracture on my xrays that explained the instability and also how I had come to tear up my knee a few months after the first "sprained" ankle remember when I was 15. He did everything right up to correctly diagnosing and planning the correct surgical procedures. He also told me I'd be fine to delay surgery as long as I wanted to which wasn't totally true and left me with weakness on the side where the surgery was done that I probably won't regain after being braced to prevent further injury for 5 years.

    My situation is a little different than yours because it was an injury. I know nothing about hypocure. But because I know I'm far from alone in having a podiatrist who wasn't completely accurate and it is far better to know this before you've had incisions made I really urge you to find the foot/ankle ortho specialist. You often can find them at teaching hospitals and it is worth driving a bit to get to one. My surgeon is 2.5 hours away and the many trips to see him were worth every bit of the drive because he gave me what I thought was impossible: a nearly normal ankle. If you see someone who is certified and feel that they validate what the podiatrist said or you agree with the podiatrist over the ortho or whatever you've then had a 2nd opinion, always good before surgery anyway and if there is a reason this is a very bad idea the ortho will have had a chance to explain why so you can make an even more informed decision.

    Good luck to you!

    I hope someone can give you answers to the rest of your questions.
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    Old 01-15-2015, 04:00 PM   #4
    Peach86
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    Re: hyprocure

    I had an MRI before my first surgery. It took about 2 hours for one foot. Unfortunately, it was not accurate in diagnosing my condition. My doctor diagnosed me with PTTD based on xrays and my symptoms, but the tendon appeared fine on the MRI...I also had several "second" opinions. Based on the MRI, my doctor thought he would be able to just "clean up" the tendon along with the reconstruction. (Hyprocure was never an option for me because of the severity of my condition...My heels were shifted out, the front of my feet were turned out, and my Achilles was so tight that I couldn't bring my foot above level.) However, during surgery they discovered that my tendon was significantly degenerated with multiple tears/elongation/severe scarring, and I had to have the FDL transfer. We didn't even bother with an MRI before my second surgery.

    I'm certainly no medical expert, but I think the additional 2 week recovery time sounds a bit optimistic for work done on tendons. My surgeries were different and much more extensive than what you are having, but the "bone" procedures healed LONG before the "soft tissue" procedures. After the first surgery, I remember my doctor saying "Now, the long part of your recovery begins" when the boot came off at 12 weeks postop. Even when my doctor was planning on just "cleaning up" the tendon, he told me to expect at least a year recovery...The tendon transfer lengthened that time even more. The majority of the healing occurred within the first 6-9 months, and I was active again at around 4 1/2 months post op; but, I'm still gaining strength in the first foot at 1 year, 4 months post op...My second surgery was definitely a set back in the strengthening department, but, thankfully, hasn't caused any issues with foot number one...I just haven't been able to exercise it like it needs to continue strengthening.

    I have a job that requires me to be very active/on my feet all day. I was able to return to that without restriction (other than not doing something stupid/or overdoing it) around 6 months postop...I had been working before that point, but with modifications to my normal activity level. Due to the second surgery, I'm back to working 1/2 days at a desk and 1/2 days from home.

    I had 5 months of PT following my first surgery and just started PT following the second...Once again, my surgery was different; but, this gives you an idea of what you could be facing if you end up having to have the complete reconstruction.

    Hopefully, my story doesn't scare you, but I agree with JustMeJen that another opinion from a well-respected foot/ankle specialist would probably be a good idea if you haven't done that already. One of the first doctors I went to was a podiatrist who accurately diagnosed me, but made surgery seem like it would be no big deal...My current surgeon from the start told me that it WAS a big deal and that I needed to be prepared for how long the recovery was. In hindsight, I know that I would have had a horrible outcome if I hadn't changed doctors. The podiatrist also charged me RIDICULOUS amounts for all sorts of braces, orthotics, etc. One day alone, I left his office with over $1300 in braces (that didn't work)! Unfortunately, I didn't realize this until I got my new pair of much nicer quality orthotics from my current doctor after my first surgery and saw that they were 1/2 THE COST of my old ones! I'm pretty sure I funded a few vacations for the first doctor
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    Old 01-17-2015, 02:42 AM   #5
    kartney
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    Re: hyprocure

    Thank you all for the information and advice. I was also wondering about pain. How much pain should I expect post op? What about the following days after? What did you guys do for pain control? What did you take for pain? Anything make the pain worse/better?

    Thank you!

     
    Old 01-17-2015, 05:38 AM   #6
    Titchou
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    Re: hyprocure

    I want to second the suggestion to see an orthopedic surgeon who is foot and ankle board certified. They have many years more training than a podiatrist not to mention the extra time and effort for the F & A Board certification which most pods don't bother with. If you are in a city with a pro football or basketball team or near a major college with an athletic department, find out who they use and go see that person. Will be a very good surgeon.

     
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