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  • Avoiding PTTD Surgery

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    Old 02-24-2015, 08:21 AM   #1
    sinclair34
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    Avoiding PTTD Surgery

    It is with great caution, that I write this post. I am a PTTD surgery survivor, right ankle reconstruction done 11/2013. I have since had double knee replacement surgery 10/2014. I am not anxious to have any more surgery, so I have been doing PT like crazy, and also Pilates. My fear is that my left foot might ultimately need ankle reconstruction. My left arch has fallen, but it isn't very painful yet and there is minimal damage according to MRI.

    I don't regret my right foot surgery, as it was needed, there was definitely tendon damage, and my result has been good. But who wants to go through that again? So my goal is to protect/strengthen my left so that I can avoid it.

    I am VERY encouraged about my ability to do that. I have been strengthening my abs, back, legs and feet...and they are all connected and make a difference. On top of that, I have a private Pilates instructor who REALLY understands feet. Apparently proper foot positioning, gait and strength are a core part of Pilates. A well-trained instructor can help. I am learning to use muscles in my feet that I didn't know existed. My "natural" way of walking is all wrong, and has contributed to my problem.

    So I am posting this, for those of you who have not yet progressed to severe tendon damage. Yes, wear good supportive shoes and orthotics, but don't stop there, you need to strengthen your feet. I believe that braces and casting are the worst thing you can do if you still have a reasonably good tendon. You will only weaken what you have...which is fine for a brief period to heal acute inflammation, but not for long-term unless you are already in really bad shape and beyond recovery.

    My solution is time-consuming, and private Pilates instruction is not cheap, but for some, this might be a solution.
    __________________
    ________
    Bilateral TKR sched for 10/20/2014
    11/2013 PTTD ankle reconst.gastroc recession, FDL xfer, peroneus brevis to largis xfer, PT repair, calcaneal and 1st cun.osteotomy, calcaneal bone graft

     
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    Old 02-24-2015, 08:33 AM   #2
    debdeb24
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    Re: Avoiding PTTD Surgery

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by sinclair34 View Post
    It is with great caution, that I write this post. I am a PTTD surgery survivor, right ankle reconstruction done 11/2013. I have since had double knee replacement surgery 10/2014. I am not anxious to have any more surgery, so I have been doing PT like crazy, and also Pilates. My fear is that my left foot might ultimately need ankle reconstruction. My left arch has fallen, but it isn't very painful yet and there is minimal damage according to MRI.

    I don't regret my right foot surgery, as it was needed, there was definitely tendon damage, and my result has been good. But who wants to go through that again? So my goal is to protect/strengthen my left so that I can avoid it.

    I am VERY encouraged about my ability to do that. I have been strengthening my abs, back, legs and feet...and they are all connected and make a difference. On top of that, I have a private Pilates instructor who REALLY understands feet. Apparently proper foot positioning, gait and strength are a core part of Pilates. A well-trained instructor can help. I am learning to use muscles in my feet that I didn't know existed. My "natural" way of walking is all wrong, and has contributed to my problem.

    So I am posting this, for those of you who have not yet progressed to severe tendon damage. Yes, wear good supportive shoes and orthotics, but don't stop there, you need to strengthen your feet. I believe that braces and casting are the worst thing you can do if you still have a reasonably good tendon. You will only weaken what you have...which is fine for a brief period to heal acute inflammation, but not for long-term unless you are already in really bad shape and beyond recovery.

    My solution is time-consuming, and private Pilates instruction is not cheap, but for some, this might be a solution.

    I know what you mean. My left foot is flat, has a bunion and 4 hammer toes but it does not bother me so I am hoping I can get by without having that foot fixed. I am wearing orthoctics and good supportive shoes. I was walking wrong before I had surgery on my right foot but not I am doing pretty good with my walking. I am walking correctly now with both feet but every now and then I can catch myself walking wrong. Maybe I should think of exercising for my left foot.
    __________________
    Surgery was on 12/04/13, Gastroc slide, Lapidus bunionectomy, LCL, PIP arthroplasty toes 2-5, FDL transfer, MDCO, and PTT debridement.

     
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    posterior tibal tendonitis, posterior tibial tendon surgery, pttd



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