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  • vertigo after Stapedectomy

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    Old 07-11-2014, 12:51 PM   #1
    slc73
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    vertigo after Stapedectomy

    Had my operation on Tuesday and have had vertigo ever since (It is Friday today). Is this normal and when will it go away. I cannot walk unaided for fear of falling, cannot even get dressed. Also there was a lot of blood the first morning after the surgery it dried up but today there was a pool of fresh blood in my ear again.

     
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    Old 07-28-2014, 05:39 PM   #2
    mommales
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    Re: vertigo after Stapedectomy

    It sounds normal to me. I've had two surgeries now, and am currently 3 days post op from my last one. The prior was 13 years ago. But in both cases I had vertigo and needed help walking. The first time it lasted a bit longer. This time, I feel like I can get up and move around a bit better now.

     
    Old 08-21-2014, 02:55 PM   #3
    botbot
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    Re: vertigo after Stapedectomy

    I had my stapedectomy 3 weeks ago to the day and I'm still not over the vertigo. Saw the surgeon a week after and she removed the packing. At that point, she told me the vertigo should already have subsided and prescribed me a 10-day course of steroids (prednisone) to reduce swelling and alleviate the vertigo. After that it still didn't go away and in fact got worse, and finally, after 2 days of the world spinning and feeling like I could pass out at any moment, I ended up at the ER for the first time in my life. It turns out I have something called BPPV, a surgery complication. Apparently the surgery caused some crystals in my inner ear that are responsible for sense of balance to be knocked into the wrong part of the ear. This means my brain constantly thinks I'm in motion. I can barely keep my head straight and the smallest of motions sends everything spinning. I've been taking motion sickness pills (meclizine) just to get out of bed in the mornings, which I can tell you is a pretty lousy way to wake up. When I went to the ER, the surgeon performed something called an Epley maneuver to try and move the crystals back into the right place. In the short-term, this has made the vertigo even worse, but 2 days later and I'm hopeful that it's starting to settle down (though I can still barely move my head without everything starting to swim). The prognosis is that this could resolve itself within a day or two, or it could take upwards of 3 months. I can't even begin to imagine feeling this way for 3 months, so I'm hoping against hope that it'll get better quickly.

    A word of advice to anybody considering this operation - be prepared for your life to be disrupted. My surgeon made it seem like I'd be pretty much fine in a week after the operation. Three weeks on and I'm anything but. Yes, the operated ear is letting in a lot more sound, and yes, I'm only now realizing how much hearing I'd lost. Sounds remains distorted, but by now I'm not as overwhelmed by it and at least feel like my hearing is indeed improving. But as a 32-year-old otherwise healthy woman, I did not expect to be out of commission for this long. My work is affected and I've had to use up all of my days off just to recover - and I've had to go back to work even though I've technically been placed off of it for another week. I really wish I had known just how disruptive this operation will be. As long as the vertigo subsides and the tinnitus I've developed since the operations quiets down, I think I will ultimately think this was a good decision. But for right now, I'm still regretting it and wishing I had been better prepared for this lengthy and extraordinarily taxing recovery. I've never had vertigo like this and it is one of the worst feelings I've ever had to deal with. Pain would've been easier to deal with; at least pain can be managed with medicine. Three weeks of sitting at home but feeling like you're on a cruise ship in a storm is miserable. Be aware that doctors view this procedure in terms of the ultimate outcomes - 90%+ improvement rates in the end - but that you need to be prepared for the reality of having your life 100% disrupted, possibly for weeks. I'm sharing my story because I wish somebody would have told me this before I agreed to the operation. Good luck to any who are going through with it. Hope this is nothing but a cautionary tale for you.

     
    Old 10-22-2014, 01:16 PM   #4
    Rolngstn
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    Re: vertigo after Stapedectomy

    How are things with either of you?
    After 3 weeks I still have too much vertigo to leave the house, even walk steps.
    My doctor said that I need time to recover and to be patient. Did time help your symptoms? If so, how much time? I spend most of my time in bed and do not want to develop depression also.
    I will appreciate anything you can tell me.

     
    Old 02-25-2015, 08:31 PM   #5
    sunshineTerri
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    Re: vertigo after Stapedectomy

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by botbot View Post
    I had my stapedectomy 3 weeks ago to the day and I'm still not over the vertigo. Saw the surgeon a week after and she removed the packing. At that point, she told me the vertigo should already have subsided and prescribed me a 10-day course of steroids (prednisone) to reduce swelling and alleviate the vertigo. After that it still didn't go away and in fact got worse, and finally, after 2 days of the world spinning and feeling like I could pass out at any moment, I ended up at the ER for the first time in my life. It turns out I have something called BPPV, a surgery complication. Apparently the surgery caused some crystals in my inner ear that are responsible for sense of balance to be knocked into the wrong part of the ear. This means my brain constantly thinks I'm in motion. I can barely keep my head straight and the smallest of motions sends everything spinning. I've been taking motion sickness pills (meclizine) just to get out of bed in the mornings, which I can tell you is a pretty lousy way to wake up. When I went to the ER, the surgeon performed something called an Epley maneuver to try and move the crystals back into the right place. In the short-term, this has made the vertigo even worse, but 2 days later and I'm hopeful that it's starting to settle down (though I can still barely move my head without everything starting to swim). The prognosis is that this could resolve itself within a day or two, or it could take upwards of 3 months. I can't even begin to imagine feeling this way for 3 months, so I'm hoping against hope that it'll get better quickly.

    A word of advice to anybody considering this operation - be prepared for your life to be disrupted. My surgeon made it seem like I'd be pretty much fine in a week after the operation. Three weeks on and I'm anything but. Yes, the operated ear is letting in a lot more sound, and yes, I'm only now realizing how much hearing I'd lost. Sounds remains distorted, but by now I'm not as overwhelmed by it and at least feel like my hearing is indeed improving. But as a 32-year-old otherwise healthy woman, I did not expect to be out of commission for this long. My work is affected and I've had to use up all of my days off just to recover - and I've had to go back to work even though I've technically been placed off of it for another week. I really wish I had known just how disruptive this operation will be. As long as the vertigo subsides and the tinnitus I've developed since the operations quiets down, I think I will ultimately think this was a good decision. But for right now, I'm still regretting it and wishing I had been better prepared for this lengthy and extraordinarily taxing recovery. I've never had vertigo like this and it is one of the worst feelings I've ever had to deal with. Pain would've been easier to deal with; at least pain can be managed with medicine. Three weeks of sitting at home but feeling like you're on a cruise ship in a storm is miserable. Be aware that doctors view this procedure in terms of the ultimate outcomes - 90%+ improvement rates in the end - but that you need to be prepared for the reality of having your life 100% disrupted, possibly for weeks. I'm sharing my story because I wish somebody would have told me this before I agreed to the operation. Good luck to any who are going through with it. Hope this is nothing but a cautionary tale for you.
    Hi, I sure do hope you are doing much better. Thank you for the honest feedback on the risks associated with this type of surgery. I am considering this surgery and I am trying to learn everything I can before I have this done.

     
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