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  • PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

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    Old 02-15-2006, 04:03 AM   #1
    dreambetter
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    Cool PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    I had RF Ablation for AV Nodal Reentry Tachycardia when the procedure was in the experimental phases. I had one of the pioneering cardiologist do the procedure. Just in case your you're new to cardiac problems, I put it in plain english... I had rapid heart beats, or arrhythmia's, that ran up into 250 beats per minute. The electrical fibers in my heart, in the atrial-ventricular node, caused a "looping" and thus I would go from a normal rate, 60 to 100, into 150 plus. As a result I suffered a mild stroke in my twenties, flat-lined too many times, had a load of other complications yet survived it all. You can survive tachycardia and arrhythmia's! I had PAC's, premature atrial contractions, PVC's, premature ventricular contractions, and all the so forth. When they ablate, radio frequency burning-like a laser, they usually take the slow track. My problem started in my teens and I continued to have it until I had surgery at 35. You can survive your cardiac problem and find help that is not based on meds! No one today would know that I had a stroke, so you can heal. For the most part, I do not take any medications other than aspirin. Yet, I have to keep tabs on my cardiac health, constantly, and I try to focus ahead on the complications that come with it to avoid most problems. Whenever I get colds, influenza, or anything related to respiratory infection that get extreme, I tend to get slow and rapid pulse, PVC's, chest pains, dizziness, and the "fear." Oral infections, related to the teeth and gums, can cause the same problems(this is a very important issue to watch!). Sometimes infections are too tough to overcome with time, currently I'm taking antibiotics for a respiratory infection, and likely I'll end-up with IV antibiotic therapy because it's a bad one. Watch any infection, especially oral problems, and if it takes too long to resolve, get the antibiotics and take them. With ablation, you have to protect yourself when it comes to infection because you're slightly prone to some mild to extreme cardiac consequences, or "irritation." A bad infection can "express" itself in and around the heart or lungs; thus, the cardiac problems such as rapid heart rate and premature beats come about. Just as a side note, a couple of things...I had to prep for a sigmoidostophy(a normal check for colon cancer and whatnots...a 12 inch tube and camera) requiring fasting and a dose of an over-the-counter laxative, magnesium-citrate. This gave me a heartblock, or BBB(it is an actual side-effect from the product which I found-out afterwards), where the heart skips a beat altogether-but eventually beats-on. BBB is bundle branch block. Magnesium, potassium, calcium, and sodium are critical to the hearts chemistry, known as the pump. Thus, as I found-out, be extremely careful with high doses of those minerals. -And-carefully research any prescribe or over-the-counter drugs to avoid such ordeals. Also, I'm posting this because I read most of this board and there are lots of fears and wonderment. I'm not an expert(however I eventually studied and certified in cardiovascular med), but should you wonder if you can "handle" it, know that you can. The most important element is "information." Learn about your problem . Ask you cardiologist every question, bring a written list, and never feel too dumb to ask anything. It is a known psychological component to cardiac problems, the desire to learn. Knowledge helps overcome fear. Fear will always happen with cardiac problems, it biochemical, but the knowledge will help you get through it. And finally, if you have a deep-seated fear that is ominous, doom-like, don't hesitate...go to the emergency room or call 911. That is why I am alive today. I never abused the ER, but I always trusted my instincts...listen to your heart....This site is a great resource to discover that you are not alone!

     
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    Old 02-15-2006, 12:42 PM   #2
    Graciella
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    Angry Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Hi,

    My name is Graciella and I'm 25 years old. A couple of year back, I started having rare incidences of palpitations, Rapid heart beats. It was bothersome but since it would occur so seldom, I didn't think much of it. Over the past year it has become more frequent and it wouldn't just happen when exercising. I am a healthy individual, none of the risk factors apply to me (no coffee, no alcohol, no obesity).
    So, I had myself checked recently and found out I suffer from P. A. T. or supraventricular atrial Tachycardia.
    The treatment involves a procedure called ablation, the removal of tissue by heat or cold with a catheter.
    I am not sure where to go from here. I haven't experienced any fainting yet, so, I don't really want to do it, since I am not at a very serious stage. I'm not sure how serious this is, but from what you're describing it's pretty darn serious.

     
    Old 02-15-2006, 06:10 PM   #3
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    Wink Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Graciella,

    First off, I'm merely giving you my opinion and hope that you will seek the advice of a physician in order to make any decisions, absolutely validate this information with your cardiologist. PAT, or paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, is a sudden-periodic attack, an abrupt onset, of atrial tachycardia. A single "irritable" focus in the atria takes over control of the heart to produce rates of 150-250 bpm. Some of these rapid signals to beat faster are usually blocked by the AV node to keep the ventricular rate in a normal range so that the entire heart can handle it, a type of limiter. Note though, at some point the ventricles can speedup as well. The AV, atrial-ventricular, node is within the AV junction, and is a part of the conduction system that slows conduction of impulses through the AV junction. So the overall system to keep your heart at a normal range has an electrical anomaly. As we age so do our muscles and that is why many cardiac symptoms become more prominent in the twenties. Take a rubber band, for example, a new one can stretch, rebound, and stretch again without much change to its body. Whereas, an older one may not have that flexibility, show wear & tear, and rebound larger. It doesn't mean that your heart is weakening or that this condition will "stretch" your heart too far, it's just that you're likely to experience your condition more often as you get older. Thus, whether you can cope and manage 150-250 beats per minute is something that you need to determine? How will this work in your life, lifestyle, and psyche? Will you always be in the best health to overcome it? I am not stating these things to cause you undo fear, but to be realistic. In terms of Atrial Tachycardia, when the atria beats so rapidly the ventricle doesn't always have enough time to fill with blood, then the blood volume might not meet the needs of your body. Beats that go towards 175+ will likely have more felt symptoms and you don't seem to express that. With less proper volume of blood you can feel anxiety, chest pains, shortness of breath, and lightheaded just to name a few issues. Have you had these symptoms? Again, as you age you may get more events and thus have more symptoms. It that likely? That is something that you must gauge. It is not that, no matter what, it will get worse, the question is do you feel that it is getting worse and can you handle it? Do you have meds, has the doctor taught you Vagotonic maneuvers or Vagal, to push your abdominal muscles down or out, as to strain hard-like you were passing difficult bowel matter? Do you have depression and fear that grows with each event and it remains at that level? Impending fear can make a future episode seem far worse. Can your family handle it all? Look, I'm being blunt and I don't mean to frighten you. Know this, ablation is way too easy and relatively safe. The benefits typically outweigh the risks of the condition. It is noninvasive and it may correct your problem close to entirely. All surgeries have risks; however, when your condition becomes too much, then you'll need to consider what will improve the quality of your life. If that choice is ablation, you can handle it as long as you go into it knowing all the benefits and risks. Who ever does the procedure-check-out, seek the best and diligently check their credentials. See your cardiologist, and nothing but & not just a regular Doctor, on a regular basis. Have a plan if the beats get too, too rapid, such as meds and getting to an ER? The Key word to describe your condition is "irritable," and you have good physical protocol, but are there irritants such as stress, lack of sleep, not eating regular meals at regular times? Be brave and know that you will get through it because so many have. Overcome fear with knowledge and the ability to cope as calmly as possible (and this means overriding biochemical, physiological reactions). There is a lot of verbiage here, I hope that I have not made it worse...just don't be afraid to face your issue, don't be afraid to improve you life and health if the benefits outweigh the risks...And smile...your burden is one of many...

    Last edited by dreambetter; 02-16-2006 at 01:50 AM.

     
    Old 02-15-2006, 09:28 PM   #4
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    Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    i have frequent pvc's 10-12k a day for the past 4 years, that two docs and two cardios said it was fine after some tests. I had unhealthy teeth, i do have gingavitis with plaq build up that im getting removed. I went years without having seen a dentist and let it build up, now over the last 3 months i have been taking care of my teeth like theres no tomorrow, brushing and rinsing and all the good stuff. I had two infected teeth, one eventually went away and the other resulted in a extraction of a wisdom tooth, (both infections came way after i started noticing the pvc's) after so long of taking care of my teeth, My gums look healthy besides the plauqe i have to have removed. im tring to eat healthy and get into a diet and get under 200lbs (currently 210 5'11) But i doubt my pvc's came about from my gums, my cardio said they can just "pop" up in anyone, even a 24yrold with a otherwise healthy heart. I do have the occasional "chest pain" but its releaved with a change in position or a nice burp. and if its prolonged, its a pinpointable muscle i can recreate the pain with. Btw no rapid Heart Rate, just pvc's

    I wanna have the ablation done but im scared stiff to do it.

    (ps, i asked my cardio and he said that the only way that gums can have a neg effect on your heart causing HD and irregularitys if the problem presists over a long long period of years, we both know people who have never been to the dentist and so much picked up a toothbrush, lost several teeth, yet no probs)

    Last edited by yugokid; 02-15-2006 at 09:41 PM.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 01:12 AM   #5
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    Smile Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Yugokid,

    It's been a slow process for medical doc's to consider the connection between oral and physical health, but it's coming-on and getting stronger. Weekly, -statistics gradually increase in odds favoring the profound impact of oral health upon the heart. What is known now is that folks with oral/dental issues are twice as likely to have heart problems, an increased risk of cardiac arrhythmia, vascular issues, inflammatory diseases of the heart, heart valve infections, stroke risk, 2.7 times more likely to suffer heart attack, 7-8 times more likely to give birth prematurely, can raise blood sugar contributing to diabetes, and can contribute or increase the severity of respiratory diseases. There is an established link between some dental procedures and a rare infection of the heart lining called bacterial endocarditis when bacteria from the mouth enters the bloodstream. Periodontal disease is a chronic bacterial infection of the gums. The beginning stage of the disease is known as gingivitis, which is a curable condition marked by inflammation and bleeding of the gums. The later, irreversible stage is known as periodontitis. Periodontitis involves loosening of the teeth and deterioration of the jaw bone beneath them. Advanced periodontal disease can lead to chewing problems, pain, and tooth loss. Currently, there are two leading theories that link periodontal disease with heart disease. The first holds that the periodontal bacteria (from dental plaque) can enter the bloodstream through inflamed gums, during the simple act of chewing, or through small cuts and tears made by dental procedures. Once in the bloodstream, some of these bacteria can produce an enzyme that causes blood platelets to become sticky and form small blood clots that may contribute to the development of hardening of the arteries, or atherosclerosis. The second theory is that the presence of gum inflammation enhances overall inflammation throughout the body, which may cause further buildup of existing arterial plaque. Studies have shown that inflammation in the gums, such as found with periodontal disease, is connected to an increase in white blood cells, C-reactive protein and other markers for inflammation. Until a connection is either proven or disproven, the American Heart Association recommends that people with heart disease take extra precautions regarding their dental health and this includes taking antibiotics before and sometimes after any dental procedure. In any case, you need to let your dentist know if you have any cardiac issues so that you both can determine if any precautions should be taken prior to your dental work. You're 24 and said that the infection to the gums and extraction occurred after the PVC's, but you had gone for years without seeing a dentist and had plaque built-up. Having merely PVC's doesn't mean you have a cardiac condition. PVC's are normal in anyone. In fact, a number of people have PVC's and aren't even aware of them. However, in some cases as the heart act-up a person can become acidotic (related to gastrointestinal issues-such as brups), hypovolemic (diminished blood volume, diminished water content-thirst), dig-toxic (withhold digitalis-watch mineral intake), and hypoxic (deficiency of oxygen, poor blood gas-needing air). You stated that you get "chest pains" and burp which relates to being acidotic; however, this may solely be an existing gastric issue and not a cardiac reaction. It can also come about due to stress and fear as a result of the PVC's. If your cardiologist won't connect oral health to cardiac health, so be it, but there are an abundant number of medical professionals who believe there is a direct correlation. I can think of an example to pose a question to you, why do you have car insurance? Hopefully it's a fail-safe even though you hope you do not have an accident. Much like that, keep your oral health up just in case. 10 to 12K PVC's does go beyond the norm and since you do-actually have some oral issues, keep-up on them...have insurance with regular and timely dental care-prior to problems. As far as ablation, the thought of having it is far more frightening than the procedure. I think that those of us who have had it, did so because the quality of our lives suffered. The heart condition became the focus of our lives and we lived-in discontent, fear, and suffering. Trust me, if a cardiologist strongly suggest this procedure and you have the feelings that I've described, you will look forward to the relief and can handle the fear knowing that your life will greatly improve. At 24 you have the option to reverse a great many things to your body. Now that you have a few markers, strive for a healthy life and see if you can avoid remedies that might cause you distress. At your age you have less stress to your body verses a 34 year old, and so on. Thus, it is easier to prevent something than it is to recover...

    Last edited by dreambetter; 02-16-2006 at 01:56 AM.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 02:41 AM   #6
    redbaron
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    Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    I have a problem with Ablation at this stage of it's development -

    A physician really needs precise anatomical information during ablation because one move in the wrong direction could damage healthy heart tissue or puncture the organ, current methods for visualizing the heart, using X-rays and fluoroscopy, are potentially hazardous because they involve radiation and produce only two-dimensional images, which are not as accurate as 3D images.

    I am not trying to be negative, and I'm certain that ablation is the best option for some people, but the longer you can delay the procedure the more advanced the procedure will become. I personally think that at some time in the near future 'Magnetic Resonance Imaging' combined with Ultrasound will provide the 3D image required for a safe Ablation without the X-Ray radiation.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 09:26 AM   #7
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    Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Thanks for your post. I do have periodontal disease in the late stages and will be going to the dentist as soon as i get my works dental plan to have the plaque removed. Be honest tho, my pvc's were prolly not caused by the lack of oral hygine was it? I mean being only 24 i still did brush and floss once in a while but let it go too far, now im tring to prevent further damage by following my dentists orders till i see him. Orla bacteria (sp) can lead to heart disease and such and a higher risk of heart attack. Im just tring not to let this get to me at such a young age, i mean it would be hard for something like this to affect me this young right? the plauqe started building in the last year so it has not been too long as far as i can remember. I did take anti biotics after the extraction of a wisdom tooth that was problem, so i know it had not effect on me. Now is it possible for a infection on a wisdom tooth to just "go away" after a day or two, cause thats what i think happened to me a couple years back, was there, then gone, then came back after a year and poof, had it pulled.

    So if i remember correctly you said it was just a increased risk. Since my irregularity was diagnosed as PVC's its prolly nothing to do with the oral part of me, which means i still have time to get it fixed right?

    Im reading at the periodontal disease main website and they say that periodontal disease was only linked to things such as heart disease.
    iv also found nothing linking PD to PVC's.

    I asked several people on different forums and my cardio and he said he has come accross many people with as many pvc's as me with no underlying, like me so it really put my mind at ease

    BUT THAT DOES NOT MEAN IM GONNA LAY DOWN AND DO NOTHING.

    Im gonna prevent anything from happening now and see the dentist in a month so that means i still have time to turn my teeth and overall health good again eh? they are at the stage where they are a little loose, but am taking action as fast as i can

    Last edited by yugokid; 02-16-2006 at 04:03 PM.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 09:28 AM   #8
    Graciella
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    Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land


    Thank you for the thorough post. Please read in-line replies:


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by dreambetter
    Graciella,

    First off, I'm merely giving you my opinion and hope that you will seek the advice of a physician in order to make any decisions, absolutely validate this information with your cardiologist. PAT, or paroxysmal atrial tachycardia, is a sudden-periodic attack, an abrupt onset, of atrial tachycardia. A single "irritable" focus in the atria takes over control of the heart to produce rates of 150-250 bpm. Some of these rapid signals to beat faster are usually blocked by the AV node to keep the ventricular rate in a normal range so that the entire heart can handle it, a type of limiter. Note though, at some point the ventricles can speedup as well. The AV, atrial-ventricular, node is within the AV junction, and is a part of the conduction system that slows conduction of impulses through the AV junction. So the overall system to keep your heart at a normal range has an electrical anomaly. As we age so do our muscles and that is why many cardiac symptoms become more prominent in the twenties. Take a rubber band, for example, a new one can stretch, rebound, and stretch again without much change to its body. Whereas, an older one may not have that flexibility, show wear & tear, and rebound larger. It doesn't mean that your heart is weakening or that this condition will "stretch" your heart too far, it's just that you're likely to experience your condition more often as you get older. Thus, whether you can cope and manage 150-250 beats per minute is something that you need to determine? How will this work in your life, lifestyle, and psyche? Will you always be in the best health to overcome it? I am not stating these things to cause you undo fear, but to be realistic. In terms of Atrial Tachycardia, when the atria beats so rapidly the ventricle doesn't always have enough time to fill with blood, then the blood volume might not meet the needs of your body. Beats that go towards 175+ will likely have more felt symptoms and you don't seem to express that. With less proper volume of blood you can feel anxiety, chest pains, shortness of breath, and lightheaded just to name a few issues. Have you had these symptoms? I haven't experiences any of these symptoms, but as I mentioned earlier I have the need to yawn to get a full breath of air. Again, as you age you may get more events and thus have more symptoms. It that likely? That is something that you must gauge. It is not that, no matter what, it will get worse, the question is do you feel that it is getting worse and can you handle it? Do you have meds, has the doctor taught you Vagotonic maneuvers or Vagal, to push your abdominal muscles down or out, as to strain hard-like you were passing difficult bowel matter? The doctor hasn't mentioned anything about medication, he suggested ablation from the start. Do you have depression and fear that grows with each event and it remains at that level? Well, what I've noticed nowadays is that fear takes over immediately when an authority approaches me or when all eyes are on me. I'm not sure if this has anything with low self-esteem. But I definitely didn't used to react like that in the past. Impending fear can make a future episode seem far worse. Can your family handle it all? Look, I'm being blunt and I don't mean to frighten you. Know this, ablation is way too easy and relatively safe. I've read some of the past posts in here and there was even mentioning of insertion of a pacemaker as ablation caused implications. The benefits typically outweigh the risks of the condition. It is noninvasive and it may correct your problem close to entirely. All surgeries have risks; however, when your condition becomes too much, then you'll need to consider what will improve the quality of your life. If that choice is ablation, you can handle it as long as you go into it knowing all the benefits and risks. Who ever does the procedure-check-out, seek the best and diligently check their credentials. See your cardiologist, and nothing but & not just a regular Doctor, on a regular basis. Have a plan if the beats get too, too rapid, such as meds and getting to an ER? The Key word to describe your condition is "irritable," and you have good physical protocol, but are there irritants such as stress, lack of sleep, not eating regular meals at regular times? Actually I lead a pretty healthy lifestyle, and the palpitations occur only once in a while (more often recently). Be brave and know that you will get through it because so many have. Overcome fear with knowledge and the ability to cope as calmly as possible (and this means overriding biochemical, physiological reactions). There is a lot of verbiage here, I hope that I have not made it worse...just don't be afraid to face your issue, don't be afraid to improve you life and health if the benefits outweigh the risks...And smile...your burden is one of many...
    Over the period I responded to your post I yawned times plus forced myself for a deep breath 4 times...hmmm, it is so annoying, it makes you look like you're a very tired person all day.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 05:42 PM   #9
    dreambetter
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    Wink Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Yugokid,

    It's that issue of "insurance," -proper care to any part of the body is simply wise and could potentially provide stronger resistance if not some form of preventative care for yourself. As I had written to you previously, PVC's are normal in everyone. True, there are outside factors that contribute (other than cardiac) with equally opposing opinions as to their cause, yet know that sometimes you are able to minimize them. I know that when my body is not up to par I tend to get more PVC's and that is why I keep myself in good health. It gives me the ability to handle and avoid complications, I have greater endurance and thus I haven't experience a severe "domino" effect. I've seen that "effect" in others who haven't keep themselves healthy, lived horribly poor lifestyles, and did everything to compromise themselves, like a death wish. The consequences, -when they became ill, they got worse and worse and may have created other medical complications. Nothing I've written to you was intended to cause you fear. At 24 you're in a good place. You're turning your lifestyle around, making strong efforts to improve every aspect of your health, and your seeking knowledge. It's that awareness that will help keep you in a good place and promote good health -even with PVC's. I think you can fix a great many things. Look at it this way (and this is not related to you -nor to frighten), when I had my stroke it left me seriously compromised. Nearly 20 years ago I had many stroke related issues with half of my body including speech and brain functions, as well as other problems. Today, my heart is incredibly healthy, my brain is too, I have medical tests to prove my excellent recovery and health and many problems were nearly, entirely resolved. You can reverse damage and I am real proof. Take it from me, you can fix it, but don't think about it...do it! Absolutely, keep your oral health top notched, watch your diet, lifestyle, and all the things that contribute towards good health. Never be afraid to explore, learn, and change for the better...and smile a whole lot! Did you know that laughter, smiling, and a positive attitude has done more for good health than just about anything? Keep a good...no great attitude and hang-in there!

    Last edited by dreambetter; 02-16-2006 at 05:45 PM.

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 06:06 PM   #10
    yugokid
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    Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    yea for the post again, i sometimes just cant see how someone who was so active got this, but never the less it dont bother me anymore. My only issue now is getting to the dentist for the "scailing" which im opting to do alseep, but gonna ask that they have a doc with a heart monitor on me, otherwise i guess i'll just suck it up and just get numbed up

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 06:50 PM   #11
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    Talking Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Graciella,

    I'm going to address your statements within the text...In a response to Yugokid I had mentioned this: ..."in some cases as the heart acts-up a person can become acidotic (related to gastrointestinal issues-such as burps), hypovolemic (diminished blood volume, diminished water content-thirst), dig-toxic (withhold digitalis-watch mineral intake), and hypoxic (deficiency of oxygen, poor blood gas-needing air)." Your yawning is a normal cardiac reaction. It sounds like you sense the need for air, hypoxic, but this need can also be compounded by fear. In fact, fear itself could create it. There is another factor, proper sleeping habits. Some people actually require more than 8 hours of sleep per night. Do you know how much you need to feel rested and are you getting enough sleep? Medical issues, or other issues, have symptoms...know that your body is responding in a normal way. -Next, your doctor suggested ablation before anything else? With PAT the heart beats fast and it is a rapid regular pulse unlike other cardiac conditions, that can be chaotic, and that may be one of the reasons why you weren't prescribed meds, but I wouldn't know for sure? However, this is not an unusual approach to some periodic cardiac issues. However, if you find that you are having many episodes you should return to your cardiologist and determine if that status should change. And ask you current Doctor if folks like you have meds available. Just having them can give a sense of security and help with the fear elements, kinda like a placebo-pacifier effect. As well, get a second opinion. You can have any doctor request a copy of your medical records, as well as any cardiac tests, and they might advise a different approach. As a side note, the heart is called the "sodium pump" because the chemistry that takes place on a cellular level within the cardiac electrical conduction system. Sodium and potassium trade places across the cell wall, thereby initiating the flow of electrical current within the heart. I think, I'm trying to remember, the general chemistry mix is sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium. So with rapid heart rates many folks get mildly depleted in these minerals. Often it will not blatantly show-up on blood chemistry panels, but still there are symptoms and signs that relate to these types of depletions (or even abundances). -But just in case, have you had a recent blood chem test, if not then you might get one? Perhaps you could research what supplements are available that relate to your issues, what amounts are safe, double-check with your doctor, and determine if you could safely take them. Next, your feelings of anxiety...just about everyone I know, including myself, has hit some point in our lives where we felt a running bout of anxiety. Our thoughts within our minds can overwhelm us and yet we often feal awkward telling people, sharing-it, and keep it to ourselves. Support groups are fantastic. There are cardiac support groups. Lots of information is exchanged and a big burden can be lifted. The emotional thoughts you have should also be shared with your doctor...share them-so what! Yes, sometimes they'll come back at you and offer psych-meds, but taking them will be based upon your decision. For that matter, any meds prescribed should first be research for all the possible effects so that you go into it with you eyes wide open. And consider the options of alternative treatments for meds that are optional, sometime they work. Next, ablation and pacemaker concerns...all surgeries have risks and there are, sometimes, complications with medical issues, but all of this may or may not be ahead of you. Think preventive, safely do things to improve your health, react to episodes with all of your focus. If you get to the point of ablation, or anything else, then put your mind 100% towards it knowing that you want the safest, the best and get 2nd and 3rd opinions. This is about quality of life, living, and making the right choices. Graciella, think positive. I could give you tons of examples of positive thinking, great attitude, and overcoming challenges, but you've got it within yourself. I never thought that I could get through my heart problem while it was happening, but I did. With each episode I prayed that it would never happen again. I denied, fought, and avoided, but then I realized that it was my "thorn" and I had to overcome it. I know so many people that have done just that. Trust me, you might not think you have it in you, but you do! Take time to focus on how to handle your challenges, work a strategy, have a game plan, and then face it. You can do it...go girl!

     
    Old 02-16-2006, 07:47 PM   #12
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    Cool Re: PVC's, Ablation, and Fear & Loathing in Cardiac Land

    Redbaron,

    I really wanted to carefully think-out your post...I was a guinea pig and did the procedure in the experimental stage before it was ever approved. I was so fortunate having an excellent outcome. The procedure lasted over 7 hours, my heart did stop, but the surgery worked and it was absolutely worth it. I've since met with the doctor many times, we've kept in touch, and he has told me that I was one of two that were the toughest. Thus, for so much risks, a great deal of good came out of it. I had so much fear going into it. Back then the procedure was done without sedation, so I was awake the whole time. Laying flat on your back for 7 hours with a ton of monitors surrounding you, masked faces, and a continual beeping sound from your own heart is a lot to deal with. But I found out something, I could endure it. All my life I was skittish, a chicken and never thought I had the ability to get through such a challenge, but in retrospect it was a breeze. It wasn't so bad, even while it was happening. After a while, once I got over the initial fear, I found myself consumed with amazement and awe. I wouldn't hesitate to recommend it to anyone. I am so glad I did it. Going into it, I knew all the risks, and they were greater then than they are today, but my condition was so bad it was literally killing me. In the years leading-up to it, the times that I flatlined or received cardiovertion, ...I felt this clicking-clock and knew that if I did nothing I might not be so lucky with each "next time." Meds were not helping and as I got older the risks significantly increased, as well as the difficulty in me rebounding; thus, the benefits truly outweighed the risks. That is the first consideration when deciding if surgery is a viable option. Not everyone has the time to wait until a surgical procedure has evolved into perfection before they can do it. You can apply that to just about any type of medical procedure, let alone life, but the days keep counting. You are absolutely right to express your opinion, but I'm confused...have you had the procedure done and/or -are your symptoms life-threatening? True, even if something will correct your problem 90 some-odd percentage, sometimes there are residuals effects. But I tell you what, what I'm dealing with today is nothing like it was before the procedure. My heart condition put such a damper upon my life. My condition became all that I was. ER rooms, medical bills, tons of treatments that made me temporarily better-but often worse, other problems that arose from the treatments, and being a young woman that was recovering from a stroke not knowing if I would ever be normal again. The wait to surgically resolve my problem was literally killing me. I couldn't see myself relying on medication and merely praying that another episode would not happen, so I had to do more. It was impossible to have a normal life, plan ahead, and merely have hope. My condition was getting the better of me and making me miserable minute by minute. I love hope and positive thinking, but risks and truth belongs in that thinking. I was a worst case scenario and today if you were to meet me, you might never recognize that I had any medical difficulties. I don't think that you are negative. You are right and responsible to express your opinion. All surgeries have risks and no truth or reality should be withheld. I am with you on this, in some cases it can be the last choice, but I would like to add to that...If a medical condition is getting to point like mine was, seek options and maybe...no...do take the risk because life is worth it. Even when life is bad, it is so worth it. I do have some medical complications today, but they are minor and due to having my cardiac condition of 17 years before I was able to have surgery. I hope and wish the best for you. Thank you for the post. And for anyone who reads this, the benefit...the b e n e f i t! If it outweighs the risks and it gives you quality of life, hope, and even a real viable future...don't avoid it merely based upon fear or wait as long as I did, just know all there is and make the wisest choice as soon as you need it.

    Last edited by dreambetter; 02-17-2006 at 01:19 AM.

     
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