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    Old 09-08-2004, 06:04 PM   #1
    Walty10
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    anti depressants slow compensation?

    Hey its Walty

    Theyve put me on some Leprexo for my anxiety. I have heard that this can slow compensation though. Is this true? I hope not because I really seem to have been improving lately and was looking forward to getting back to normal. Will this also slow the effects of my gaze stimulation excercises?

    Thanks Again, you all have been so helpful. I really dont know how people deal with this without these boards.

     
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    Old 09-08-2004, 06:49 PM   #2
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Hi Walty,

    I can't remember, is Lexapro a member of the SSRI family? If so, I think you'll be okay. Scott has posted that SSRIs may actually help with compensation. The kind you want to stay away from are not SSRIs, but those like Valium and Xanax. They have vestibulo-suppressant qualities, that is they dull the brain's reception of signals from the inner ear. Fine for when you're in the really messy early throes of this junk, but over time with that dulling, the brain can't compensate because it's not getting the full effect of the inner ear signal. To my knowledge, SSRIs don't cause that problem. Maybe Scott will chime in on this.

    As for the gaze exercises, can't answer to that.

    Cheers,
    T

     
    Old 09-08-2004, 08:55 PM   #3
    studyin
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Walty10
    .....I have heard that this can slow compensation though. Is this true?....
    Hi Walty,

    The current evidence would suggest the opposite is true - that in fact SSRIs (serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors) such as Lexapro probably AID compensation by promoting the growth of new neurons in the brain and perhaps within the vestibular nerve itself. Many studies tie anxiety and vestibular upsets together and I think, in most cases, the two are inseparable and seem to be circular - ie. dizziness causes anxiety and the resultant anxiety can perpetuate the dizziness unnecessarily (this is not always the case though as some on the board hardly experienced much anxiety at all).


    Quote:
    From Subs - March 23, 04
    Anti-Depressants,Etc...

    There is a body of evidence building that the A/D & Anxiety drugs---which generate/act on neurotransmitters--and take a few weeks to kick in--are in reality---causing stem cells generated within the brain to create new neurons(brain cells) to replace damaged cells

    ---while neurotransmitters generation maybe happening---also---the evidence seems to be indicating--that people get better--primarily--due to the new neurons--the drugs are stimulating

    ---there are Many years of research yet to be done to confirm or prove it wrong--but they are working it.......interstingly

    ---they have known for about six-seven years that the brain is generating new stem cells and that they take about two-three weeks to get to where their needed---but has not been clear how it all is taking place......

    So one day---we might see A/D drugs being given for vestibular nerve damage--to re/generate new neurons--as well as for----
    Quote:
    Dizziness and Panic Disorder: A Review of the
    Association Between Vestibular Dysfunction and Anxiety

    Ann Clin Psychiatry 1998 Jun;10(2):75-80
    Simon NM et al

    Serotonin selective reuptake inhibitors are good candidates for future treatment studies of patients with vestibular dysfunction. Vestibular neuronal firing in the rat is modified by 5-hydroxytryptamine, and dysregulated serotonergic function in general may lead to vestibular dysfunction. Deficiencies in serotonergic tone may cause increased sensitivity and excitability of pertinent sensory neurons. Findings suggest that patients with panic disorder and symptoms of vestibular dysfunction may respond to treatment with SSRIs. Because of the effectiveness of serotonin reuptake inhibitors for panic and related conditions, and the effects of serotonin on vestibular function, the SSRIs are good candidates for future treatment studies.
    Quote:
    Neural substrates linking balance control and anxiety.
    Physiol Behav 2002 Dec;77(4-5):469-75
    Balaban CD

    Two clinical developments during the previous decade suggest that central serotonergic mechanisms may be important in vestibular function, particularly in the observed linkage between vertigo and anxiety disorders. First, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are efficacious in the treatment of vertigo. Second, the SSRI discontinuation syndrome has vestibular manifestations: acute onset dizziness, vertigo, and incoordination, all of which are exacerbated by head and eye movements. The provocation and exacerbation of these balance symptoms by head and eye movements is suggestive of serotonergic modulation at the level of central and peripheral balance circuitry. The distribution of the serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in vestibular pathways in rats illustrates that collateralised raphe projections to the vestibular nuclei and the central amygdaloid nucleus may influence common receptor types.
    Scott

     
    Old 09-08-2004, 10:38 PM   #4
    Walty10
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    hmm well thanks alot


    this is great to hear

    certainly good news



    Thanks Again your help is always appreciated!

     
    Old 09-09-2004, 02:14 AM   #5
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Walty,

    Just wondering how bad the anxiety got for you, what stage of the illness you're in (is it labyrinthitis you have?) and lastly how you're finding the lexapro so far? Have they started you on a half dose or the "full monty". It might also give you a lift to know that once I started Cipramil the whole thing started moving uphill for me in a big way and, although I've had blips and hit some big potholes on the way, I think I'm not far from ditching the whole mess. So hang in there....I'll be interested to know if things start to become significantly better for you on lexapro.

    Cheers....Scott

    Last edited by studyin; 09-09-2004 at 02:18 AM.

     
    Old 09-09-2004, 05:24 AM   #6
    studyin
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Em,

    I'm really concerned about your symptoms, being endlessly tired, the depression and now it appears anxiety is settling in too with the racing heart etc. It's not good and REALLY think you should just grab the bull by the horns, take the plunge, and try an SSRI......I just keep hearing the words of my Dad's doc friend who said it can become more and more ingrained into your physiology (the anxiety) if you don't break the cycle......it's like your hobbling around with a broken leg and it needs a cast on it to heal.... you could just start with trying a half dose and see how it goes. You won't become hooked on it in 2 weeks that's for sure. You'll know within a week or two if it's going to be ok with you and I'm pretty certain it will be. Sometimes you have to try and find the right one that works best for you too (ie. Zoloft was no good for me whereas Cipramil was instant relief). I think you'll feel better just knowing your trying a whole new attack on this. And imagine if it works???....and you start seeing some serious recovery happening. It may not kill the dizziness overnight but at least you'll feel mentally charged again and could get out there and work, hang out more with friends etc.....all of these things will help you recover. This has been my experience and also of another girl I know who only got over labs after taking an SSRI and getting back into her life fully. She was lucky...it all ended in 6 months for her. Don't know if you saw the post I put up re the clinical trials on Cip. That's a pretty good indicator of the side-effects and invloves HUNDREDS of people.....most of the sides will go within a few weeks too. I reckon even if you did a search on the side-effects of aspirin, you'd find a bad story out there on the net.

    When are you getting these heart palps btw?

    Scott xxxx

     
    Old 09-09-2004, 04:04 PM   #7
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    hey scotsman... umm i havent been diagnosed with anything yet. Went to a show at planetarium with lots of spinning things and thats when it all started. Billy explained Lab to me.. that it can be caused by many different things but you just need to give time for compensation and youll be alright.

    Im coming along well. i still feel vertigo when sitting or lying down and i still have a kind of lightheaded overwhelming sensation in my head. Someone told me that this is because my brain is depending alot upon my vision for stability temporarily and it just causes sensory overload. Ive been doing gaze fixation excercises and they seem to help.

    As far as anxiety... I have developed a bit of agoraphobia and anytime i need to go out anywhere i have to take some lorazepam... I have alot of the symptoms of generalized anxiety and I also have pretty sever panic attacks.

    Ive only been on lexapro for two days but hopefully it will do the trick for me. I was worried about side effects but havent felt any yet.

     
    Old 09-10-2004, 12:49 AM   #8
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Hi Walty.....could it be BPPV you have considering it was set off when you laid back at the planetarium? Did any virus come with this? Any warning signs before it hit at the planetarium? Just wondering if you should have a go at the modified Epley maneuvre to shift any ear rocks back into place!

    You'll definitely see an end to the acute anxiety and panic attacks with Lex. I often wonder what people did 200 years ago when this sort of thing happened? I wonder if we might be stuck with it for life without the aid of certain meds?

    Cheers...Scott

     
    Old 09-10-2004, 02:35 PM   #9
    Walty10
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    umm i went to a physical therapist with a little vestibular training in the hopes that he might put my little crystalsback into place if thats the case. I told him my situation though and he didnt do that method so i assumed it wasnt BPPV. I really dont know a difference though. Maybe if you could give me a little explanation of both I might be able to figure it out. And about a virus.. yeah when i first went into the doctor for this they thought that i may have just finished a sinus infection and when i went in for my MRI they found alot of unwanted gunk in my sinuses. I took 2 weeks worth of antibiotics though and im not cured so i dont know. any info would be great

    Thank You

     
    Old 09-10-2004, 08:47 PM   #10
    studyin
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Hi Walty,

    To the best of my knowledge, if it's BPPV, you should be checked out by a pro first and have the Epley maneuvre performed if they think that's what is needed. Otherwise the modified epley maneuvre (MEP) is also supposed to be able to cure this in a large number of cases....see the link in the Archive. On the other hand, if it's a viral cause, then it's a matter of staying as active as possible, possibly adding VRT to your daily routine and waiting for this thing to run its course and your brain to compensate for the mixed up signals. Unfortuantely, this can take a long time for some. Combatting any resultant anxiety and depression as you are already doing is a smart move. As far as I am concerned, anxiety is a nasty side-effect of this that serves only to either slow or completely stall recovery/compensation.

    Scott

     
    Old 09-11-2004, 08:38 AM   #11
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    Re: anti depressants slow compensation?

    Walty: BPPV is sometimes the primary problem but often comes secondary to other problems (eg VN or Labs), as BPPV is one of the easiest to cure of all vestibular problems then get that seen to first, as scott says the epley has good results with majority of people with BPPV clearing up after the first manuaver, also the MEPs are looking good for the future. If after the crystals are moved back (ie the BPPV is cured) you are left with residual symptoms then either the crystals damaged some hair cells, or there is some other deficit within the inner ear (which could have been caused a virus, which could of caused BPPV) bottom line is it's unimportant, a deficits a deficit and as long as there is no active processes causing fluctuations then thats all that matters, recovery is through compensation.

     
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