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  • MRI of the cervical spine

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    Old 03-17-2017, 09:07 AM   #1
    Oshalaby
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    MRI of the cervical spine

    Please I need a clear explanation for my MRI findings.

    Technique:
    Using multiple Sagittarius and axial T1 and T2 sequences, the exam was performed on a 3tesla multi-channel MRI.

    Findings:

    1. The cervico-cranial junction is unremarkable.

    2. There is reversal of the usual cervical lordosis. There are advanced changes of cervical spondylosis. Disc-osteophyte complexes are noted at all cervical levels.

    3. There is moderate stenosis of the spinal canal at C5/C6 and C6/C7 levels resulting from disc-osteophyte complexes and thickening /buckling of the ligamenta flava. There is mild impingement on the spinal cord surface without apparent medullary signal alteration.

    4. Mild narrowing of the central canal is noted at C4/C5 and C7/T1 levels.

    5. There is sever foraminal stenosis at C4/C5 and C5/C6 on the left and C6/C7 bilaterally resulting from uncovertebral joint spurring and arthrosis/hypertrophy of the facets.

    6. There is T2 signal increase in the central aspect of the pons which can be in the context of ischemic foci without excluding central pontine myelinolysis. To be correlated with the clinical data.

    7. The upper airway is compromised in part by a prominent uvula. Sleep disorder should be considered in a proper clinical context.

    Conclusion:

    1. Advanced cervical spondylosis with reversal of the usual lordosis.

    2. Moderate degenerative spinal canal stenosis at C5/C6 and C6/C7 levels.

    3. Degenerative foraminal stenosis mostly at C4/C5 and C5/C6 on the left and C6/C7 bilaterally.

    4. Central pontine T2-hyperintensities (ischemic foci versus central pontine myelinolysis. To be correlated with the clinical data.

    5. Upper airway compromise ( in part by prominent uvula). Sleep disorder/apnea should be considered.

    Thanks

    Last edited by Oshalaby; 03-17-2017 at 09:20 AM. Reason: Misspelled word

     
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    Old 03-19-2017, 10:16 AM   #2
    teteri66
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    Re: MRI of the cervical spine

    Welcome to the board. Please know that members are not doctors nor do we have professional medical training. We are just fellow back and neck pain sufferers who share experience and knowledge.

    I don't know what type of doctor ordered your MRI but I would suggest you see a spine specialist for an accurate diagnosis and plan for treatment. This could be either an orthopedic spine surgeon or a neurosurgeon. There is enough degenerative change that you will want to be under the care of a specialist.

    Basically you have spondylosis which is an umbrella term used to refer to the aging and degeneration of the spine...Spondylosis describes spinal degeneration accompanied by pain, and is often used as a synonym for spinal arthritis. It affects the discs and facet joints, and causes narrowing (stenosis) of the foramina and central canal which can put pressure on the spinal nerves. This can account for the pain that often radiates out from the neck to shoulders, arms and hands.

    This is particularly bad at C4-5 and C5-6 where there is severe foraminal stenosis on the left side and on both sides at C6-7. The foramina are openings at each vertebral level where the spinal nerves exit the spine to go out to the area of the body that the specific nerve innervates. When this opening gets blocked by things like material from a herniated disc, bone spurs, enlarged facet joints, etc. there is not sufficient room for the spinal nerve to function normally and the result is nerve pain, tingling, maybe numbness that is felt at the localized spot or anywhere along the path of that nerve..i.e. Radiating pain felt in a limb, etc.

    In addition the imaging noticed a large uvula which may be impacting breathing and the radiologist suggests you may want to be evaluated for sleep apnea.

    Last edited by teteri66; 03-19-2017 at 10:19 AM.

     
    Old 03-19-2017, 07:24 PM   #3
    Oshalaby
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    Re: MRI of the cervical spine

    Thanks a lot!!!!!!!
    QUOTE=teteri66;5452975]Welcome to the board. Please know that members are not doctors nor do we have professional medical training. We are just fellow back and neck pain sufferers who share experience and knowledge.

    I don't know what type of doctor ordered your MRI but I would suggest you see a spine specialist for an accurate diagnosis and plan for treatment. This could be either an orthopedic spine surgeon or a neurosurgeon. There is enough degenerative change that you will want to be under the care of a specialist.

    Basically you have spondylosis which is an umbrella term used to refer to the aging and degeneration of the spine...Spondylosis describes spinal degeneration accompanied by pain, and is often used as a synonym for spinal arthritis. It affects the discs and facet joints, and causes narrowing (stenosis) of the foramina and central canal which can put pressure on the spinal nerves. This can account for the pain that often radiates out from the neck to shoulders, arms and hands.

    This is particularly bad at C4-5 and C5-6 where there is severe foraminal stenosis on the left side and on both sides at C6-7. The foramina are openings at each vertebral level where the spinal nerves exit the spine to go out to the area of the body that the specific nerve innervates. When this opening gets blocked by things like material from a herniated disc, bone spurs, enlarged facet joints, etc. there is not sufficient room for the spinal nerve to function normally and the result is nerve pain, tingling, maybe numbness that is felt at the localized spot or anywhere along the path of that nerve..i.e. Radiating pain felt in a limb, etc.

    In addition the imaging noticed a large uvula which may be impacting breathing and the radiologist suggests you may want to be evaluated for sleep apnea.[/QUOTE]

     
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