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    Old 02-23-2013, 11:40 PM   #1
    goldentine
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    Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    I'm 36 years old and on 9-15-2012 I was rushed into emergency brain surgery from a massive large scale hemorrhage in my right temporal area.

    Earlier that day I was at an estate sale on my knees sorting thru vinyl records. I then stood up to walk out the door to drive home. But when I stood up I suddenly felt dizzy and had a funny taste / smell sensation come over me. It was like someone was burning rubber in my mouth. I made it to my car and while I was driving home (about a 5 mile drive) I started feeling the worst headache of my life. I made it home but when I got there I suddenly lost my balance which was causing me to stumble and fall all over my house only to have my fall broken by me bashing head first into every wall as I kept getting back up and falling again. This happened about 10 times around my house, including falling down my first flight of stairs head first into a retaining wall. I simply couldn't keep my balance. I finally managed to stumble into my bed to lay down around 12pm thinking I was just tired and needed a nap. What I didn't know is that was I was having a massive cerebral brain hemorrhage.

    My brother found me 6 hours later. And when he found me unresponsive passed out on my bed he called my mom over. I vaguely remember my mother standing by my bed saying "I think he's had a stroke". She and my step-dad didn't wait around for an ambulance at that point. They put me in the car and drove straight to the ER.

    I woke up the next day in the ICU with 65 staples in my head after having a craniotomy to drain the massive bleed and to remove a 4 inch blood clot. My first question in the ICU to the surgeon when I awoke was... "Can I ski this year?"

    Fast forward exactly 2.5 months from the day of the bleed... I stepped back onto my downhill skis and clocked in at a downhill speed of 62 mph. So all things considered I walked away from something that should have left me dead or left me with with a major lifelong disability.

    I'm a software developer and film editor and was back working 4 weeks after the day of the stroke.

    I do suffer from a mild visual field loss in my upper left field of vision. Which isn't so much of a problem. I've adjusted to the visual loss mostly. But I still have my fingers crossed that the vision thing will resolve itself. I know it's wishful thinking but I wholeheartedly believe it will resolve itself.

    Which brings me to my main question. I wake up everyday with a hazy feeling and it lasts all day long. The neurologist I'm seeing put me on dextroamphetamine which does help a little. But the hazy feeling I've had since the hemorrhage is getting annoying to put it simply.

    I'm just wondering if anyone else out there has had the same prolonged hazy groggy feeling after a hemorrhage and I'm wondering if it's ever cleared up.

     
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    Old 02-28-2013, 12:49 PM   #2
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    Hello,

    It is interesting to me that you were put on Dexadrine. It was determined that taking Dexadrine for ADD was the cause of my hemorrhagic stroke, and sounds like that is the same kind of stroke that you had as well. I am sure your physician weighted the pros and cons and made the appropriate decision, just find it interesting.

    Anyway, back to your question about feeling "hazy". I had a parietal lobe hemorrhagic stroke a year ago, and I still feel hazy sometimes. For the first 6 months or so I felt somewhat detached from reality - kind of like when you are really over tired and everything feels a bit surreal. This started to really lessen around the 8 month mark, and has been decreasing all of the time, but it still hasn't totally gone away.

    Question about your visual field: I have unilateral neglect on the right hand side from my stroke, is that what you also have?

     
    Old 02-28-2013, 10:46 PM   #3
    goldentine
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    Well I'd called my surgeons office back in early Jan and he referred me to his neurologist colleague to deal with my issues. So it was the neurologist who put me on that stuff. But it's dextro-amphetamine that he put me on... which in my view is basically pharmaceutical speed... being that it's an amphetamine and a strong stimulant.

    And yes the way you describe the "haziness" you had is spot on!! A surreal detachment is exactly the feeling. Almost a "stoned" type feeling would be another way to describe it.

    As for the vision is it took me a while to even become consciously aware that I had a vision problem. I started realizing it about 3 months out. But since the surgeon only deals in actual surgery, and the neurologist only puts me on speed... I began relentlessly researching it myself and came across the term "homonymous hemianopia" ... I then got myself into an ophthalmologist about two days ago and I'm now officially diagnosed with...

    Homonymous Quadranopsia

    Which basically means the same side of both eyes. Which in my case is the left.... Wherever my focal point is, then everything to the left of it is a dense blind spot. I mean I can hold my palms up in front of the mirror, stare myself right in the face and wiggle my left fingers and cannot see them.

    But it turns out my optic nerve wasn't damaged from the stroke, and in my case it's that the neural pathways were pretty much obliterated in my right temporal area where a pool of blood built up. So it's not my eyes that aren't seeing what I can't see.... It's that the visual information isn't being sent to the back if the head for processing.

    Funny thing about the neglect though, in my researching I've sorta self diagnosed myself with spatial neglect in the past week. I even asked the ophthalmologist if that would be an accurate diagnosis a few days ago and he hesitantly said "maybe".

    I've also become aware of another term that might accurately describe the haze... which is "brain fog". And the vision loss I can deal with mostly and already have considering I ski "blind" nearly everyday and just power through it. But the "brain fog" is exhausting to the point I feel lost, almost as if I'm experiencing vertigo everyday.

    And the fact that yours has receded gives me hope!

    How old are you by the way?

     
    Old 03-08-2013, 07:21 PM   #4
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    I am 27 years old, will be 28 in about 2 weeks. I had my stroke a year ago - 2 weeks before my 27th birthday. Massive cerebral hemorrhagic stroke while sitting in stats class that they determined was caused by my ADHD medication - which is a dextro-amphetamine (though I like to joke that stats is so hard that it actually made my brain bleed, and THAT was the cause of my stroke). It is essentially pharmaceutical speed, which is why it works for people with ADHD, it "wakes up" the central executive in the brain (I was a psychology student before my stroke :P). Which I suppose would be why it was prescribed to you to help you feel less foggy. Does it help? Not that I would be allowed to take it for ANY purpose. I am not even allowed to take cold medication that contains pseudoephedrine. But I am curious to know if it helps.

    I find with health care, as with most things, the burden of responsibility often falls to the patient. With my neglect the only "treatment" I ever received for it was an occupational therapist telling me that if I can't find something, to look on the right side, because it is probably over there... I have right neglect. We were basically told it would likely go away on its own within a year, so not to worry about it. So by that logic it should have been gone by yesterday... I have managed to come up with a lot of strategies to deal with the neglect - but they are all things I have come up with on my own, the months I spent in rehabilitation never once addressed it. I am not sure about what you have, but in my case neglect affects all of my senses. So I will drop things if I am carrying them in my right hand, because I forget I am holding them. To counter that, I rub my hand over what I am holding to remind myself that I need to close my hand over it, so I don't drop it. It has also led to some funny things like when I was in the hospital I reached over and grabbed my boyfriend's hand, and he said, "Ya...that would be YOUR hand you are holding there..." It has been a year and I still do that. If I am not looking, I can't tell which hand is his, and which hand is mine because they both feel foreign, so I will sometimes hold my own hand for a while. Which I find pretty funny. Most of my right side doesn't feel like it belongs to me, even though I have only mild sensory loss. I also have visual deficits on that side, and it makes things like crossword puzzles rather interesting (3 letter word for... nope, 8 letter word, I was neglecting the rest of the squares... Oops). I have come up with many ways to cope, but these things still happen. My neurologist has referred me to a cognitive neuro specialist, and I see him on Monday, so fingers crossed that he can help. I would love to be able to drive again some day...

    The fact that you ski gives me some hope. I don't think I would dare to try that. I would run right into a tree. But I probably would have done that BEFORE the stroke... lol. I really like to run, and we aren't always sure it is safe for me to be running out on the street by myself.

    Neglect is an attention issue. Like you there is nothing wrong with my eyes, they see everything, the issue is that my brain fails to pay attention to the stimuli. Which is a really hard concept to wrap your head around without experiencing it. Homonymous Quadranopsia sounds similar to the visual aspects of neglect in a lot of ways. In particular when you talk about holding your hands up and not being able to see parts of them. When I paint my nails, I often initially miss my pinky on my right hand, because I don't see it. However, like most things I can reason through it. I know that I have 5 fingers on each hand, if I have only done 4, I must be missing one... Neglect and Homonymous Quadranopsia sound so similar that I could see them being mixed up in diagnosis - and there doesn't seem to be a hard diagnostic test for either.

    My visual field is mainly affected in my peripheral vision (though I believe that is because mine is considered a minor case, as opposed to being characteristic of the condition) with the lower right quadrant being the most affected - things simply are not there. They are not blurry or distorted, they are just not there. I can effortfully force myself to attend to things in that area, but I have to be made aware to do that. So when the walk light at the cross walk is on the right hand side and no one else is waiting to cross the street, I could stand there for really long time not noticing that the light has changed. Whereas if other people start crossing the street, that would be a cue for me to look around to find the cross light.

    I have discovered that they really don't know anything about neglect. So even if you do have it, getting a proper diagnosis may not gain you anything. Which is frustrating. My eye doctor did however do a test for it, which was essentially a peripheral vision and range of visual field test. There are very few treatments it seems for any aspects of neglect, and a person can have only one, or all senses affected. I do have a book that I have found helpful, "Spatial Neglect: A Clinical handbook for diagnosis and treatment" by Ian H. Robertson & Peter W. Halligan. It is a book designed for clinicians, and is pretty expensive for such a small handbook (I found a second hand one online) It is also pretty academically written and even with a psych background I found it to be over my head in places, but I have found it more beneficial than anything anyone else has been able to give me on neglect.

    I seem to have written you a bit of a novel here, and for that I apologize. There are not many people (or any actually) that can relate to any of my visual field or neglect issues, so I suppose I am a bit excited to be able to share experiences with someone who can relate in any way.

     
    Old 03-14-2013, 02:19 PM   #5
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    I am 27 years old, will be 28 in about 2 weeks. I had my stroke a year ago - 2 weeks before my 27th birthday. Massive cerebral hemorrhagic stroke while sitting in stats class that they determined was caused by my ADHD medication - which is a dextro-amphetamine (though I like to joke that stats is so hard that it actually made my brain bleed, and THAT was the cause of my stroke). It is essentially pharmaceutical speed, which is why it works for people with ADHD, it "wakes up" the central executive in the brain (I was a psychology student before my stroke :P). Which I suppose would be why it was prescribed to you to help you feel less foggy. Does it help? Not that I would be allowed to take it for ANY purpose. I am not even allowed to take cold medication that contains pseudoephedrine. But I am curious to know if it helps.

    I find with health care, as with most things, the burden of responsibility often falls to the patient. With my neglect the only "treatment" I ever received for it was an occupational therapist telling me that if I can't find something, to look on the right side, because it is probably over there... I have right neglect. We were basically told it would likely go away on its own within a year, so not to worry about it. So by that logic it should have been gone by yesterday... I have managed to come up with a lot of strategies to deal with the neglect - but they are all things I have come up with on my own, the months I spent in rehabilitation never once addressed it. I am not sure about what you have, but in my case neglect affects all of my senses. So I will drop things if I am carrying them in my right hand, because I forget I am holding them. To counter that, I rub my hand over what I am holding to remind myself that I need to close my hand over it, so I don't drop it. It has also led to some funny things like when I was in the hospital I reached over and grabbed my boyfriend's hand, and he said, "Ya...that would be YOUR hand you are holding there..." It has been a year and I still do that. If I am not looking, I can't tell which hand is his, and which hand is mine because they both feel foreign, so I will sometimes hold my own hand for a while. Which I find pretty funny. Most of my right side doesn't feel like it belongs to me, even though I have only mild sensory loss. I also have visual deficits on that side, and it makes things like crossword puzzles rather interesting (3 letter word for... nope, 8 letter word, I was neglecting the rest of the squares... Oops). I have come up with many ways to cope, but these things still happen. My neurologist has referred me to a cognitive neuro specialist, and I see him on Monday, so fingers crossed that he can help. I would love to be able to drive again some day...

    The fact that you ski gives me some hope. I don't think I would dare to try that. I would run right into a tree. But I probably would have done that BEFORE the stroke... lol. I really like to run, and we aren't always sure it is safe for me to be running out on the street by myself.

    Neglect is an attention issue. Like you there is nothing wrong with my eyes, they see everything, the issue is that my brain fails to pay attention to the stimuli. Which is a really hard concept to wrap your head around without experiencing it. Homonymous Quadranopsia sounds similar to the visual aspects of neglect in a lot of ways. In particular when you talk about holding your hands up and not being able to see parts of them. When I paint my nails, I often initially miss my pinky on my right hand, because I don't see it. However, like most things I can reason through it. I know that I have 5 fingers on each hand, if I have only done 4, I must be missing one... Neglect and Homonymous Quadranopsia sound so similar that I could see them being mixed up in diagnosis - and there doesn't seem to be a hard diagnostic test for either.

    My visual field is mainly affected in my peripheral vision (though I believe that is because mine is considered a minor case, as opposed to being characteristic of the condition) with the lower right quadrant being the most affected - things simply are not there. They are not blurry or distorted, they are just not there. I can effortfully force myself to attend to things in that area, but I have to be made aware to do that. So when the walk light at the cross walk is on the right hand side and no one else is waiting to cross the street, I could stand there for really long time not noticing that the light has changed. Whereas if other people start crossing the street, that would be a cue for me to look around to find the cross light.

    I have discovered that they really don't know anything about neglect. So even if you do have it, getting a proper diagnosis may not gain you anything. Which is frustrating. My eye doctor did however do a test for it, which was essentially a peripheral vision and range of visual field test. There are very few treatments it seems for any aspects of neglect, and a person can have only one, or all senses affected. I do have a book that I have found helpful, "Spatial Neglect: A Clinical handbook for diagnosis and treatment" by Ian H. Robertson & Peter W. Halligan. It is a book designed for clinicians, and is pretty expensive for such a small handbook (I found a second hand one online) It is also pretty academically written and even with a psych background I found it to be over my head in places, but I have found it more beneficial than anything anyone else has been able to give me on neglect.

    I seem to have written you a bit of a novel here, and for that I apologize. There are not many people (or any actually) that can relate to any of my visual field or neglect issues, so I suppose I am a bit excited to be able to share experiences with someone who can relate in any way.

     
    Old 03-14-2013, 06:15 PM   #6
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    I am 27 years old, will be 28 in about 2 weeks. I had my stroke a year ago - 2 weeks before my 27th birthday. Massive cerebral hemorrhagic stroke while sitting in stats class that they determined was caused by my ADHD medication - which is a dextro-amphetamine (though I like to joke that stats is so hard that it actually made my brain bleed, and THAT was the cause of my stroke). It is essentially pharmaceutical speed, which is why it works for people with ADHD, it "wakes up" the central executive in the brain (I was a psychology student before my stroke :P). Which I suppose would be why it was prescribed to you to help you feel less foggy. Does it help? Not that I would be allowed to take it for ANY purpose. I am not even allowed to take cold medication that contains pseudoephedrine. But I am curious to know if it helps.

    I find with health care, as with most things, the burden of responsibility often falls to the patient. With my neglect the only "treatment" I ever received for it was an occupational therapist telling me that if I can't find something, to look on the right side, because it is probably over there... I have right neglect. We were basically told it would likely go away on its own within a year, so not to worry about it. So by that logic it should have been gone by yesterday... I have managed to come up with a lot of strategies to deal with the neglect - but they are all things I have come up with on my own, the months I spent in rehabilitation never once addressed it. I am not sure about what you have, but in my case neglect affects all of my senses. So I will drop things if I am carrying them in my right hand, because I forget I am holding them. To counter that, I rub my hand over what I am holding to remind myself that I need to close my hand over it, so I don't drop it. It has also led to some funny things like when I was in the hospital I reached over and grabbed my boyfriend's hand, and he said, "Ya...that would be YOUR hand you are holding there..." It has been a year and I still do that. If I am not looking, I can't tell which hand is his, and which hand is mine because they both feel foreign, so I will sometimes hold my own hand for a while. Which I find pretty funny. Most of my right side doesn't feel like it belongs to me, even though I have only mild sensory loss. I also have visual deficits on that side, and it makes things like crossword puzzles rather interesting (3 letter word for... nope, 8 letter word, I was neglecting the rest of the squares... Oops). I have come up with many ways to cope, but these things still happen. My neurologist has referred me to a cognitive neuro specialist, and I see him on Monday, so fingers crossed that he can help. I would love to be able to drive again some day...

    The fact that you ski gives me some hope. I don't think I would dare to try that. I would run right into a tree. But I probably would have done that BEFORE the stroke... lol. I really like to run, and we aren't always sure it is safe for me to be running out on the street by myself.

    Neglect is an attention issue. Like you there is nothing wrong with my eyes, they see everything, the issue is that my brain fails to pay attention to the stimuli. Which is a really hard concept to wrap your head around without experiencing it. Homonymous Quadranopsia sounds similar to the visual aspects of neglect in a lot of ways. In particular when you talk about holding your hands up and not being able to see parts of them. When I paint my nails, I often initially miss my pinky on my right hand, because I don't see it. However, like most things I can reason through it. I know that I have 5 fingers on each hand, if I have only done 4, I must be missing one... Neglect and Homonymous Quadranopsia sound so similar that I could see them being mixed up in diagnosis - and there doesn't seem to be a hard diagnostic test for either.

    My visual field is mainly affected in my peripheral vision (though I believe that is because mine is considered a minor case, as opposed to being characteristic of the condition) with the lower right quadrant being the most affected - things simply are not there. They are not blurry or distorted, they are just not there. I can effortfully force myself to attend to things in that area, but I have to be made aware to do that. So when the walk light at the cross walk is on the right hand side and no one else is waiting to cross the street, I could stand there for really long time not noticing that the light has changed. Whereas if other people start crossing the street, that would be a cue for me to look around to find the cross light.

    I have discovered that they really don't know anything about neglect. So even if you do have it, getting a proper diagnosis may not gain you anything. Which is frustrating. My eye doctor did however do a test for it, which was essentially a peripheral vision and range of visual field test. There are very few treatments it seems for any aspects of neglect, and a person can have only one, or all senses affected. I do have a book that I have found helpful, "Spatial Neglect: A Clinical handbook for diagnosis and treatment" by Ian H. Robertson & Peter W. Halligan. It is a book designed for clinicians, and is pretty expensive for such a small handbook (I found a second hand one online) It is also pretty academically written and even with a psych background I found it to be over my head in places, but I have found it more beneficial than anything anyone else has been able to give me on neglect.

    I seem to have written you a bit of a novel here, and for that I apologize. There are not many people (or any actually) that can relate to any of my visual field or neglect issues, so I suppose I am a bit excited to be able to share experiences with someone who can relate in any way.

     
    Old 08-28-2013, 12:24 AM   #7
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    I know what your going thru with the fog and haziness
    As result of a hemorrhagic stroke....I am a 7 months
    After my h-stroke and am still dealing with this
    Affect. It's always there and causes me much
    Grief and confusion when solving the most simple
    Tasks.

    It makes me feel like I'm in a stupid state.. Most
    Of the time.... But care givers and rehab professionals
    Tell me just to keep faith,work hard at recovery
    And do it one day at a time... I think the fog
    Will lift for you ...mine is there but I can see the
    Smallest of improvements ..... So I know my
    Brain is improving... Just got to keep working
    It to improve!!

     
    Old 09-03-2013, 11:14 PM   #8
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    Thank you so much for mentioning this book. I found it on ****** and don't know why, but it is marked down from $73.95 to $14.15! I jumped at that and now will have one soon. I hope to be able to get something out of, although I suspect a lot will be over my head too. We all are happy just to get any new kernel or understanding. My husband has total right side loss of vision, that starts at his nose.

    I'm guessing you are all talking about a form of exhaustion? Bob's brain get so tired, he has about a 2 hour window of trying to just get thru a few daily things, then he is completely exhausted and has to go to bed. I know that is more than the hazziness, but I guess I'm saying that for all symptoms there is a scale as to had bad that symptom is for you. I'm guessing that hazziness is on the lighter side of the same scale that is about exhaustion.

     
    Old 09-04-2013, 10:21 AM   #9
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage

    Exhaustion is something I have to deal with too if I use
    too much of my brain battery .... I have to pace myself
    or things get confusing. I was told early on to avoid
    taking naps and just get a good nights rest... And I found
    That it does help build up brain energy that can last.
    Slowly Im working through this.. Fog and all..It would
    be nice to feel like a real person again !! Some of the
    stories I have been reading are very encouraging
    and provide real insight that there are better days
    ahead and that attitude is everything.

     
    Old 09-05-2013, 09:29 PM   #10
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    Re: Prolonged haziness nearly 6 months after hemorrhage


    I think it's really odd that so many of us experience prolonged haziness, but the symptom doesn't seem to be officially described anywhere - at least not where I have been reading about strokes.

    I had cerebral hemorrhage December 2011. My fogginess has improved, but I still often feel foggy. In the beginning I felt more like I was detached from myself, and the world around me was surreal. Really weird.

    I haven't mentioned anything to my doctor about my foggy brain - I think part of me thinks it's the new normal for me. Maybe I should...

     
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