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  • Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

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    Old 05-15-2005, 12:11 AM   #1
    Nutboy
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    Lightbulb Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    I have a few questions and was wondering if any of you have been in the same boat and have tried this....

    Background:
    TSH of 5.09 (0.49-4.67)
    FT4 of 0.99 (0.71-1.85)
    FT3 of 325 (230-420)
    TPO 13 (<2)
    ANT <1:100 (<1:100)
    TG <1:10 (<1:20).

    They diagnosed subclinical hypothyroidism with the probability of Hashi's based on the labs. My uptake, however, showed increased iodine uptake of 13.9% at 6 hours (3-11%), which is normal with hyperthyroidism, not hypo.

    The doctor was royally confused, as was I. My research says this can happen with iodine deficiency or Congenital Dyshormonogenesis Trapping Defect (a specific enzymatic block of hormone synthesis cause hypothyroidism poorly compensated by TSH-induced thyroid gland overactivity). This is the only thing I've found on the subject of Hypo serum results with high uptake.

    My symptoms are definately mixed:

    Hypo symptoms: dry skin, increased acne, weakness/sluggishness, sleep 15+ hours - wake unrested, nasal congestion/PSD, smoker's cough (I don't smoke), sore throat, heavy snoring, weight gain, hearing loss/pressure/tinnitus, visual loss/disturbances, muscle cramps, joint pain, headaches, indigestion, eye cosmetic changes (black and puffy eyes), loss of concentration/slow thinking, lethargy, and the feeling of food getting stuck in my throat.

    Hyper symptoms: insomnia for days at a time, tighness in chest, essential tremor, inability to tolerate heat, Lipodystrophy (loss of fat in the eyes)

    First off, since my thyroid obviously wants more iodine/iodide, should I give it more? Could this possibly help even out levels or make me feel better? Is the uptake of iodine directly related to the amount of T3/T4 your gland is producing? I definately am not deficient now as I'm a firm believer in table salt. Is there a danger in doing this? I was also curious about testing. Since my glad obviously is sucking up iodine like it's afraid it'll never get any again, should I refrain from iodine before getting labs done? Will that create a superficial raise in levels?

    Secondly, is it normal with Hashi's to rapid cycle up and down in levels? I was under the assumption that early in life it would/could make you hyper and eventually as your thyroid became nonexistent, you'd become hypo....but not something fast acting or changing on a daily basis other then the normal +-3 TSH your body naturally moves between 2PM and 2AM. And if in fact I am fluctuating more then this, how do you get to feeling better? Supplementing hormones could make you even more hyper at times.

    Thanks again for your thoughts. It's nice to have someone to run things by. I'm constantly going a mile-a-minute trying to resolve this.

     
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    Old 05-15-2005, 09:07 AM   #2
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    Maybe this might answer your questions with regard to rapid cycles....take a look at these TSH numbers for me over the last year or so....all without meds ever:

    April 23, 2003 9.840
    October 2, 2003 13.206
    April 13, 2004 15.352
    May 7, 2004 14.641
    July 30, 2004 9.119
    August 18, 2004 6.890
    September 20, 2004 5.620
    October 2, 2004 7.980
    October 7, 2004 7.040
    October 10, 2004 9.300
    November 17, 2004 7.729
    January 6, 2005 15.233
    February 7, 2005 14.659
    March 15, 2005 9.008
    April 11, 2005 6.197

     
    Old 05-15-2005, 10:31 AM   #3
    midwest1
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    Hashi's really doesn't have much to do with iodine. It's about a dying thyroid not being able to make use of the iodine it has. Mary Shomon reports in her book that she tried an iodine supplement for a time felt even more miserable while taking it. She also has received hundreds (thousands perhaps?) of letters from Hashi's patients reporting the same effect.
    She offers no theory for it... Maybe trying to spur a half-dead thyroid is like kicking a half-dead horse.

     
    Old 05-15-2005, 11:20 AM   #4
    wxKathy2
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    I've been wondering about this too - I don't know if I have hashis or not (AB negative), but I have nodules and TSH never higher than 1.7. But in the last month I had two CT scans with iodine dye and I swear my neck has shrunk for the first time in a year. I take 150 mcg of synthroid and 15 mcg of cytomel and over the last year I went from one nodule to 7. So all this time it was just increasing in size and clearly visible on my neck. Then after the CT scans I had some relief - at least I think so - I don't know if I'm crazy or not - but it seemed to help?? Anyone else have this happen?
    Kathy

     
    Old 05-15-2005, 06:03 PM   #5
    shellshocked
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    I think you'd be better off dealing with a doctor who really understood thyroid disease. Unfortunately they are hard to come by. I have read that increading idodine/iodide didn't really help any. I'd keep looking for a doctor who is willing to work with you and get things straightened out. Good luck.

     
    Old 05-15-2005, 08:49 PM   #6
    wxKathy2
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    Thanks for posting this - I'm glad I'm not crazy thinking I had some shrinking after the CT scans - unfortunately I can tell it's on it's way back to increasing in size now...but thanks again,
    Kathy

     
    Old 05-16-2005, 04:48 AM   #7
    inyourdreams
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    I had my iodine checked by blood. It's normally checked by urine, but the nurse wrote it up wrong. When I went to the lab the girl said it was the first iodine blood test she's ever drawn in 21 years. Results were 47---normal is 40-97. Dr said he'd like my levels to be around 87. He said it didn't matter whether it was done by blood or urine.

    I'm on iodine supplements-Iodoral. I have Hashimoto's. I take Cytomel for it-50 mcg's a day.

    In the May 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism stated "It is common knowledge that simple goiter due to iodine deficiency, if left without iodine supplementation, will progress to nodular goiter with some of these nodules becoming cancerous. Since simple goiter is more common in women than in men, because of their greater need for iodine, it does not take a supranormal intellect but plain common sense to come to the conclusion that iodine deficiency will eventually result in a greater prevalence of thyroid nodules in women and subsequently a greater incidence and prevalance of thyroid cancer. Therefore, it is not surprising that with the decreasing trend of iodine consumption by the U.S. population, there is a marked increase in thyroid nodules resulting in 19,500 new cases of thyroid cancer in 2001, with 14,900 cases in women."

    According to the National Nutritional Surveys--"Currently the average daily intake of iodine by the U.S. population is 100 times less than the amount consumed by the mainland Japanese. In the 1960's, iodine-containing dough conditioners increase the average daily iodine intake more than 4 times the RDA. One slice of bread contained the full RDA of 150ug. The risk for breast cancer in our population was then 1 in 20. Over the last 2 decades, food processors started using bromine, a goitrogen instead of iodine in the bread making process. The risk for breast cancer now is 1 in 8, and it is increasing at 1% per year......

    It is likely that a large percentage of patients receiving T4 for hypothyroidism are iodine deficient. This iodine deficiency is worsened by the goitrogens they are exposed to.....

    For those who trust the food processors to meet their nutritional needs, the last significant source of iodine is table salt, which contains 74ug iodine per gm of NaCI. An editorial in the February 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism exhorted the USA and Canada to decrease the amount of iodine in table salt by one half. "Most other countries use 20-40 ppm as iodine, and the United States and Canada should consider lowering the level of fortification to this range." This recommended low level of iodine fortification between 20-40 ppm had no significant effect on urine iodine levels and size of goiters in published studies from Germany and Hungary. Essentially, this amount of iodine was designed to give a false sense of iodine sufficiency but to really be ineffective. It is ironic that the title of this editorial is: "Guarding our Nation's Thyroid Health".

    These are just some clips I have taken from a bunch of papers I received from my Dr. Nowadays there is not enough table salt to take care of iodine in your body and your thyroid functions from the amount of iodine. I wish I could copy all of the pages of this article and send it to all of you because it's very good reading and very eye opening. My Dr. said the majority of women he has seen are iodine deficient. I don't think it would hurt for anybody with thyroid issues to request an iodine urine (or blood) test.

     
    Old 05-16-2005, 03:42 PM   #8
    dlkk
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    Recommended daily amount of iodine is 150mcg

    In the U.S. and other developed countries, iodine deficiency is not very common anymore, due to the addition of iodine to salt -- iodized salt -- and other food products. In fact, the most common forms of thyroid disease found in the U.S. -- autoimmune thyroid diseases like Graves' Disease or Hashimoto's Thyroiditis -- have nothing to do with iodine deficiency at all. Actually, thyroids are extremely sensitive to iodine, and you need to be careful about adding too much iodine to the diet as it can irritate or aggravate the thyroid.

     
    Old 05-16-2005, 05:02 PM   #9
    inyourdreams
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    The last comprehensive nutritional survey (NHANES III 1988-1994) revealed that the median urine iodine concentration was 145 ug/L and 15% of the U.S. adult female population suffered from iodine deficiency (urine iodine less than 50 ug/L). That is 1 out of every 7 female patients walking in a doctor's office, interestingly, the same risk ratio for breast cancer in our population, that is 1 in 8.

    I don't know, but I'm on it and my friend is on it---and we're both on Cytomel for hypothyroidism and it doesn't seem to be doing anything negative. She's lost 60 pounds and feels better than ever. Just went back to school after years and got her nursing degree.

    Like I said above, my blood iodine level was 47 and normal is 40-92, so you don't always get your iodine from table salt. I eat very little processed foods, I don't put the salt shaker on the table, I don't eat canned soups, I don't drink soda.

    My Dr. said that if my thyroid would start being hyper, that I would go off the Cytomel and only stay on the iodine----hmmmm, a natural supplement vs a prescription medicine?? I think I'd take the iodine if it does the same thing to my thyroid.

    Actually, iodine deficiency is a very real thing---and it's actually very common and becoming even more common because of all these food processors putting different additives in foods instead of iodine. I am living proof that you can't get enough iodine from iodized salt---and so is my friend that lives 2 houses down from me.

    Sure glad I got mine tested.

     
    Old 05-17-2005, 08:23 AM   #10
    dlkk
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    Re: Let's feed this thing some Iodine?

    Iodine physiology:
    Quote:
    How is iodine used by the thyroid?

    The process by which the thyroid uses iodine is actually quite complicated and certain steps are still unclear. Essentially, iodine is converted to its free elemental form, called iodide. Iodide enters the thyroid gland through a special transport mechanism. Iodide then undergoes a process called oxidation and is incorporated into intermediate hormones called MIT (Monoiodotyrosine, which contains 1 iodide) and DIT (Diiodotyrosine, which contains 2 iodides.) These compounds then combine to form the active hormones, tri-iodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). T3 is the most biologically active thyroid hormone. It is formed by combining a MIT with a DIT (so the total of iodides in the molecule is 3). T4 is formed in much greater quantity by combining a DIT with another DIT (so that the total of iodides in the molecule is 4). These hormones are then stored in the thyroid gland and released into the blood stream.

    Based on the above summary, it is evident that thyroid hormone is actually made up of iodide/iodine directly. So you can see the importance of iodine in relation to the function of the thyroid gland.
    The trace mineral iodine is an essential compnent for the manufature of thyroid hormone by a healthy gland. To function normally the thyroid requires 150mcgs a day. Most Americans consume between 300-700mcgs a day. Taking supplements of iodine has no scientific basis and can be harmful, because high iodine intake can cause or precipitate autoimmune attacks on the thyroid. There is a high frequency of autoimmune thyroid disease in the United States and Japan which could be due to hight iodine comsumption. Research has estatblished that the high dietary iodine content in some areas of the world has resulted in a rise in widespread thyroidits and thyroid cancers.

    Too much iodine in your diet will cause iodine to be trapped by a large protein found in the thryoid gland called thyroglobulin. The process of manufacturing thyroid hormone takes place in this protein. High amounts of iodinated thyroglobulin prompt the immune system to react and to cause an inflammation in the thyroid. High iodine intake can also cause iodine to be stored in the fat tissue. The constant release of iodine into the bloodstream
    form the fat stores can then cause an underactive or overactive thyroid.

    Administration of products high in iodine can trigger a thyroid imbalance amomg people with Hashimoto's and Graves disease. Too much iodine can be a health hazard for those with Hashi's and Graves.

    Foods such as seafoods, lobsters, crab, oysters, and other shellfish contain the highest amounts of iodine. Other foods that contain high amounts of iodine are breads and eggs. Plants and dairy products may have some iodine if they come from areas that have iodine in the soil. Then there is iodized salt.

    Too much iodine is harmful to the thyroid gland and can result in an under or overactive thyroid, too little iodine in the diet can result in goiter and an underactive thryoid.

    In the United States, iodine deficiency has been rare since 1924, when iodine was added to table salt. However some people do suffer mild iodine deficiency. We all need to avoid both iodine deficiency and iodine excess.

    Last edited by dlkk; 05-17-2005 at 08:58 AM.

     
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