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-   -   What is a good FT4, FT3 reading? (https://www.healthboards.com/boards/thyroid-disorders/310222-what-good-ft4-ft3-reading.html)

debbie_w_80634 08-01-2005 01:31 PM

What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
I'm looking for what numbers a good FT4, FT3 reading should be.

Also, I understand that the TSH should be around 2 - correct?

Does a person s-l-o-w down when the TSH is higher than 2 and [I]speed[/I] up when it's lower than 2?

Lady50 08-01-2005 02:57 PM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Well, from all the reading that I have done, the TSH is as useless as it can be. For women the Ft4 and Ft3 should be in the upper 1/3 of the range. I have heard that men need it a bit lower.Or, in the part of the range that you feel your best. That would most likely be above the middle of the ranges for sure.

Gopherhead 08-02-2005 06:17 AM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
A good FT reading is what your reading is when you feel great. For instance, I can have a FT3 anywhere in the top 1/2 of the range even going above the top and feel great, but FT4 has to be in the upper 1/4 (or higher) or I feel like kaka.

TSH is meaningless if you're on exogenous hormones. That being said, 95% of the population with zero thyroid problems has a TSH below 1.0.

Nat

Kali M 08-02-2005 05:43 PM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Nat. Wow. Now that just makes sense. I know you can't post links here, but is the last sentence you said supported by research. (Not that I don't believe it if it wasn't!! It's just that so many arguments with physicians are somewhat strengthened by having been published somewhere. ya know?). But it certainly makes sense to me that folks feel better under 1.0.

My mother's physician doesn't like her to be under 1.0 because her mother had osteoporsis. I know it's a balancing act, but healthcare providers need to be reminded somehow of that little issue called "quality of life"!

Gopherhead 08-03-2005 05:41 AM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
[QUOTE=Kali M]Nat. Wow. Now that just makes sense. I know you can't post links here, but is the last sentence you said supported by research. (Not that I don't believe it if it wasn't!! It's just that so many arguments with physicians are somewhat strengthened by having been published somewhere. ya know?). But it certainly makes sense to me that folks feel better under 1.0.

My mother's physician doesn't like her to be under 1.0 because her mother had osteoporsis. I know it's a balancing act, but healthcare providers need to be reminded somehow of that little issue called "quality of life"![/QUOTE]

Kali, the 95% info is pretty findable if you look :) As for the osteoporisis angle, that I can help you with, it's simply not true and it's the fault of the Great TSH Monster.

They've done all these studies that say when you get a suppressed TSH you get osteoporsis and increased risk of CVD. What they [I]failed [/I] to look at when they watched the TSH was the FTs, which were either too low, or too high - the real reason someone would develop health problems (being hypo and being hyper aren't healthy; and it's your FTs that determine if you're hypo or hyper). So we have all these doctors watching the TSH levels and not the actual thyroid levels.

Some references you can look up to help your mother and perhaps educate your doctor:

[I]"Suppressive doses of thyroxine do not accelerate age-related bone loss in late postmenopausal women" (Japan, 1995)[/I]

One group of patients was given suppressive doses of L-T4 (TSH <0.1 mU/L, n = 12) and the other group was given nonsuppressive doses of L-T4 (TSH > 0.1 mU/L, n = 12). There was no difference in bone metabolic markers and incidence of vertebral deformity between the groups....[B]These prospective and cross-sectional data suggest that long-term levothyroxine therapy using suppressive doses has no significant adverse effects on bone[/B].

Fujiyama K, Kiriyama T, Ito M, et al. Suppressive doses of thyroxine do not accelerate age-related bone loss in late postmenopausal women. Thyroid 1995 Feb;5(1):13-7.
[I]

"Suppressed TSH levels secondary to thyroxine replacement therapy are not associated with osteoporosis" (UK, 1993)[/I]

We set out to measure bone mineral densities in two groups of post-menopausal women receiving thyroxine replacement therapy (those with serum TSH levels persistently suppressed or non-suppressed) and to compare the results in both groups with those of the local control population....CONCLUSION: [B]In this patient population, the reduction in bone mineral density due to thyroxine is small. It is unlikely to be of clinical significance and should not on its own be an indication for reduction of thyroxine dose in patients who are clinically euthyroid.[/B]

Grant DJ, McMurdo ME, Mole PA, Paterson CR, Davies RR. Suppressed TSH levels secondary to thyroxine replacement therapy are not associated with osteoporosis. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf) 1993 Nov;39(5):529-33.

[I]"[Prolonged suppressive L-thyroxine therapy. Longitudinal study of the effect of LT4 on bone mineral density and bone metabolism markers in 71 patients]" [Article in French; abstract in English] (France, 1999)[/I]

Seventy-one patients (including 28 menopaused women) taking long-term L-T4 for thyroid carcinoma were divided into 3 groups according to their TSH level: low (TSH < 0.04 mlU/l), moderate (0.04 TSH < or = 0.10 mlU/l) and high (TSH > 0.10 mlU/l)....[B]No lumbar or femoral osteopenia was observed in these patients taking L-thyroxin, even for those [U]with complete TSH blockade[/U].[/B]

Rachedi F. [Prolonged suppressive L-thyroxine therapy. Longitudinal study of the effect of LT4 on bone mineral density and bone metabolism markers in 71 patients]. Presse Med 1999 Feb 20;28(7):323-9.

Nat

Lady50 08-04-2005 04:49 AM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Nat, I am so glad you posted this article. ;)

Gopherhead 08-04-2005 05:54 AM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Hey Betty, long time no see ! Glad to be of service :)

Kali M 08-04-2005 04:13 PM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Nat,

OMG! Thank you sooo much! I will certainly let me mom know about all this (and will look for the 95%). :) She sent me her lab values recently. She's made an Excel chart of them dating back to 1977. It's VERY interesting to see them. I couldn't believe no one ever did FT3 or FT4's for her! She has Hashimoto's. Her TSH got to 64 before she was diagnosed (and her doc at the time even said "you don't have hypothyroid; you look too good to have hypothyroid") when she went to get tested.

Gopherhead 08-05-2005 07:53 AM

Re: What is a good FT4, FT3 reading?
 
Your mother sounds like a woman after my own heart, Kali. FWIW, my mom's got Hashi's as well and until I got on her case a few months ago, she'd never had her FTs tested either - and she was taking her pills right before the blood draw.


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