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    Old 03-12-2013, 11:45 PM   #1
    Withered
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    Very Confused, need some help

    Trying to understand my thyroid test results, I got out reports to compare results over the past few years. The report I got in July of 2011 said my tsh showed I was on too much synthroid, so they were taking my dose from 150 mcg to 125mcg.

    The retest in Oct 2011 showed my TSH as .0038 (range 0.358 - 3.74) The letter said that these results showed that I was now on the proper dose of synthroid. Im not a genious, but at first glance, my thought was the TSH looked too low. I became more symptomatic and felt horrible when I went from 150 to 125 mcg. Doctor said it wasn't thyroid, the numbers were right on.

    Ih January of 2012, my TSH was 0.241 with the lab report showing again, the normal range was from 0.358-3.74. The letter from my Dr. stated this was in the normal range and my T3&4 were also within the range.

    In January of this year, my TSH was 0.229 with normal being .358-3.74
    MyT4 was 1.25 with normal range of 0.16-1.46
    My T3 was 2.97 with normal range of 2.18 - 3.98
    The letter from the doctor said my TSH was a little low which would indicate that I needed an even lower dose of synthroid, but since my T3&4 were normal, they weren't changing my meds unless I had palpitations.

    I hate to admit that with an advanced college degree, I still don't understand that. Of course college was many years ago and I had to hire a tutor to get me through college algebra and calc! LOL Anyway, am I missing this or misunderstanding how to read those little decimal points? You know if this proves I'm a real idiot, I will submit "brain fog" as my defense!!!!

    Help? Anyone?

     
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    Old 03-13-2013, 03:59 AM   #2
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    Re: Very Confused, need some help

    You are reading the numbers correctly, and the TSH is too low. Even if you don't have symptoms of hyperthyroidism, a prolonged hyperthyroid state can cause osteoporosis, among other things. So I would discuss with your Dr dropping down a notch. There is a 112mcg dose or 100mcg. If you are nervous, have high heart rate, insomnia, palpitations, jittery, you are symptomatic for hyperthyroidism.

     
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    Old 03-13-2013, 10:20 AM   #3
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    Re: Very Confused, need some help

    I respectfully disagree with ladybud this time.

    TSH does not indicate a hyperthyroid state on its own. Unless the free T4 and/or free T3 are more than 70% of their lab ranges, the low TSH is meaningless. My own TSH hasn't been higher than .02 in the last 10 years, but my free Ts (the actual thyroid hormones) haven't been above 60% of their ranges. HyperT is defined by excessive levels of thyroid hormones, not by excessive levels of the pituitary hormone TSH... ergo... I have neither been overmedicated nor hyperT. My MD understands that. TSH is a pituitary hormone and just an indirect indicator of the T4/T3 levels. Free Ts can be directly and accurately measured; but for some dumb reason, the indirect indicator - TSH - continues to be the so-called gold standard. Treating according to TSH is like trying to determine when to fill your car's gas tank by looking at the odometer instead of the gas gauge.

    I also have not suffered osteoporosis nor any other adverse complication during or because of my treatment, because - again - I am not overmedicated.

    Numerous studies (available at PubMed for your reading pleasure) contradict the previous assumptions about exogenous thyroid medication causing osteoP. Findings are that it's only naturally-occurring hyperthyroidism, such as that from Graves' disease, which causes bone loss. Thyroid cancer survivors, in order to prevent recurrence, are routinely treated with supra-large doses of thyroid hormone to keep TSH below reference range. It has been found they are at no greater risk of osteoP or cardiac events than the population at large. So why then are hypothyroid patients being denied the normal physiologic doses that will prevent symptom recurrence? It doesn't make sense.

    Truth is... The "decimals" of it all are just so much math. But, patients are not math equations who can have numbers arbitrarily assigned to them. Just as you have one shoe size within a standard size range that fits your foot, you have thyroid levels within those standard ranges that fit your needs. You can't have them just willy-nilly anywhere within that range - into which fits 98% of the population - and feel well there. The labs should be used as mere guidelines for which to interpret the symptoms and to arrive at the right dose. They shouldn't be used as the arbitrary gospel of your treatment.
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    Old 03-13-2013, 01:24 PM   #4
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    Re: Very Confused, need some help

    I think the bottom line is how you feel, and as long as there are no symptoms of either extreme, your Dr's advice is ok. Some people are extremely sensitive to thyroxine and tiny dose changes caqn make a noticeable difference, so if you are feeling off in any ways that pertain to your thyroid, you should let your Dr. know.

     
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