It appears you have not yet Signed Up with our community. To Sign Up for free, please click here....



Thyroid Disorders Message Board

  • ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

  • Post New Thread   Closed Thread
    Thread Tools Search this Thread
    Old 06-12-2013, 02:51 PM   #1
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Dear all,

    I am new to the boards and new to this illness, so please be patient if I seem especially ignorant!

    One year ago, my TSH was 11.9, my T4 was 14.1. Both a little on the high side, so I was re-tested a few weeks later.

    My TSH had dropped from 11.9 to 3.95 - so, within normal range. Good news!
    However, my Thyroid antibody levels were 1,972. I don't know (and can't find out) the normal ranges, but this sounds high. Can anyone advise me? A thyroid antibody level of almost 2000 (units of what, I can't say) surely doesn't sound healthy. Would the symptoms of high antibody levels be the same as for standard hypothyroidism?

    The re-test (of approx one year ago) only tested for TSH and antibodies. T4 was not measured (or if it was, my GP is withholding it and being dishonest).

    Fast forward one year, and my TSH is back up to 15.27; my T4 is also elevated to 11.7. This information was accurate two weeks ago, so I am now on 25mg of the Levo..... medication. Only been taking it for a couple of days and will move shortly to 50mg.

    The level I am most concerned, curious and interested in is the antibody level. If anyone can shed any light, I'd be most grateful.

    I am quite dissatisfied with my doctor about this, as I feel I should have been medicated a year ago, particularly as I am trying (and failing) to get pregnant. I have another appointment booked very soon. If he is evasive, vague and unhelpful I will be transferring to another clinic.

    I would be very grateful for any information from anyone more knowledgeable, as I am only at the start of navigating the information that exists online. From what I can gather, the TSH and T4 is quite a complex, dynamic equilibrium. I am particularly worried about the high antibody level of one year ago, and what the implications are of this.

    Thanks in advance of any replies,

     
    Sponsors Lightbulb
       
    Old 06-13-2013, 09:04 AM   #2
    midwest1
    Senior Veteran
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jan 2003
    Location: Missouri, USA
    Posts: 12,924
    midwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Thyroid antibodies don't cause symptoms. They cause thyroid gland damage, which causes thyroid hormone shortage. Hormone shortage is what causes the symptoms.

    Because you want to become pregnant, it's useful to know exactly which "thyroid antibodies" you're dealing with. There are two that can cause hypoT, anti-TPO and anti-Tg. Anti-TPO can cause pregnancy complications. It might be possible to reduce them by up to 40% by taking 100-200 mcgs of a selenium supplement daily. (Do not exceed 200 mcgs from all sources, though. Too much is toxic.) Anti-Tg doesn't affect pregnancy and cannot be reduced.

    I'm happy you've finally found treatment. The goal should be to reduce TSH to a consistent 1 - 1.5 and to raise free T4 to the upper third of its lab range. These are optimum for successful pregnancy.

    It's hard to find good thyroid care almost anywhere in the world, but it can be even tougher in the UK. The NHS recently re-adopted archaic standards that have handcuffed thyroid-knowledgeable practitioners from doing what they deem best for their thyroid patients. I hope you can navigate that sort of ignorance successfully. Good luck!
    __________________
    "We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses." Abraham Lincoln
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

     
    Old 06-13-2013, 11:09 AM   #3
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Midwest1 - thanks so much for replying - you sound as though you know quite a bit about the subject!

    Regarding
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by midwest1 View Post
    it's useful to know exactly which "thyroid antibodies" you're dealing with. There are two that can cause hypoT, anti-TPO and anti-Tg. Anti-TPO can cause pregnancy complications. It might be possible to reduce them by up to 40% by taking 100-200 mcgs of a selenium supplement daily. (Do not exceed 200 mcgs from all sources, though. Too much is toxic.) Anti-Tg doesn't affect pregnancy and cannot be reduced.
    I don't know which antibodies I'm dealing with - naively assumed there was only one kind. I will query it when I go back to the doctors.

    Regarding TSH of 15.27, and T4 of 11.7..... should I be worried about these levels? Are they particularly elevated? Pregnancy aside, is this a very unhealthy result?

    I don't really have a range of hypo symptoms (so far) and have only gained a few pounds, but I am utterly, hopelessly and completely exhausted, most of the time. I assume these levels would be the reason. I'll keep taking the levo, but 25mg doesn't seem much.

    Again, apologies if I seem very badly informed. The problem is that - in all honestly - I AM!

     
    Old 06-13-2013, 11:19 PM   #4
    midwest1
    Senior Veteran
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jan 2003
    Location: Missouri, USA
    Posts: 12,924
    midwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB Usermidwest1 HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by plymouthrock View Post
    Regarding TSH of 15.27, and T4 of 11.7..... should I be worried about these levels? Are they particularly elevated? Pregnancy aside, is this a very unhealthy result?
    Healthy people generally have TSH around 1.0 - 1.5. So yes, it's a sign that you need to be treated for hypothyroidism. There are no particular effects from having high TSH; it's only an indirect indication that your T4 and T3, the most important hormones for thyroid health, are too low.

    A dose of 25 mcgs is merely a starter dose. It is never a therapeutic dose. But thyroid replacement should be initiated and increased slowly to prevent a shock to the adrenals. The dose should be increased in 25 mcg increments until symptoms resolve.

    Exhaustion is probably THE most common symptom of hypoT. I hope yours will improve soon. Let us know how it goes!
    __________________
    "We can complain because rose bushes have thorns, or rejoice because thorn bushes have roses." Abraham Lincoln
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

     
    Old 06-14-2013, 01:42 PM   #5
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Midwest1,

    Thank you so very much for your responses. I appreciate your taking the time to do so - really, thanks.

    There are two (antibodies) that can cause hypoT: anti-TPO and anti-Tg. Anti-TPO can cause pregnancy complications. Anti-Tg doesn't affect pregnancy and cannot be reduced.

    Well, I had better hope that mine, registering 1,970, were the Anti-Tg kind! I'll try to find out from doc on Thursday.

    The NHS recently re-adopted archaic standards that have handcuffed thyroid-knowledgeable practitioners from doing what they deem best for their thyroid patients. I hope you can navigate that sort of ignorance successfully.

    Would the NHS-directed restrictions be in the area of monitoring the condition adequately, or prescribing remedies for it? Are you able to be more specific about the nature of the "archaic standards"?

     
    Old 06-14-2013, 02:01 PM   #6
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Another question for MidWest,

    The goal should be to reduce TSH to a consistent 1 - 1.5 and to raise free T4 to the upper third of its lab range. These are optimum for successful pregnancy.


    What IS "the upper third of its (T4's) lab range" ? Perhaps it varies from lab to lab (or even country to country)? But what might a 'typical' / 'average' lab range be?

     
    Old 06-14-2013, 02:02 PM   #7
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Another question for MidWest,

    The goal should be to reduce TSH to a consistent 1 - 1.5 and to raise free T4 to the upper third of its lab range. These are optimum for successful pregnancy.


    What IS "the upper third of its (T4's) lab range" ? Perhaps it varies from lab to lab (or even country to country)? But what might a 'typical' / 'average' lab range be?

     
    Old 06-15-2013, 12:50 AM   #8
    FinnMaid
    Senior Veteran
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Aug 2007
    Location: Finland
    Posts: 3,354
    FinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by plymouthrock View Post
    What IS "the upper third of its (T4's) lab range" ? Perhaps it varies from lab to lab (or even country to country)? But what might a 'typical' / 'average' lab range be?
    I'm not Midwest but yes it does vary as the ranges vary from lab to lab, and there are 2 different units so the ranges may look completely different in different countries. In Britain we might see a range of 12-22 so with that range you should aim to have your FT4 around 17-20 or so. Ask your lab which ranges they use. "The best levels" vary between individuals, aiming to have your FT4 around midrange is often a good starting point.

    Last edited by FinnMaid; 06-15-2013 at 12:52 AM.

     
    Old 06-16-2013, 11:28 AM   #9
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    FinnMaid, thank you for your helpful reply.

    Is it too much to hope that the levothyroxine will simultaneously lower the TSH count down towards 1.5 (from 15+) whilst also raising the T4 level up towards 17 (from 11.7)?

    Is this how it works? Will the medicaton achieve the readjustment of both of these hormones? Life in general rarely seems to work in such a straightforward way and if this is too much to hope for, I'd rather know now!

    Thank you. I've just had yet another weekend largely written off by the overwhelming desire to rest and sleep, although I do have a hectic and full-time job, so I can never tell quite which it is that causes the exhaustion (thryoid underperforming or a demanding job). In truth, it must surely be a bit of both.

     
    Old 06-16-2013, 11:51 AM   #10
    FinnMaid
    Senior Veteran
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Aug 2007
    Location: Finland
    Posts: 3,354
    FinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB UserFinnMaid HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    Your pituitary gland will pretty soon be informed of the increased thyroxine in your blood so your TSH may drop sooner than your actual thyroid levels raise (there's more T4 in your blood for a few hours after you take your med but your levels should be monitored in the morning before taking your med to get accurate and comparable results). Less TSH means less hormone produced by the thyroid so with a low dose you may get a lower TSH without raising your actual thyroid levels. Eventually when your dose is adjusted as needed your TSH will be lower and your FT4 higher, the time table is individual and dependent on how You react to your medication. TSH may also easily drop below 1 but there's no need to worry about that as long as your freeTs stay within range and you don't get any hyperthyroid symptoms.

    Last edited by FinnMaid; 06-16-2013 at 11:55 AM.

     
    Old 06-16-2013, 12:37 PM   #11
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Unhappy Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    FinnMaid,

    It's useful to know that, so long as the T4 (and T3) levels are behaving, the TSH is less of a concern.

    Also, when I next have my bloods measured, I'll take meds later in the day.

    I'm curious to know what they will be, as when they were last measured, I was technically pregnant (albeit a very very early pregnancy which ended shortly afterwards - unhappy smiley was supposed to go here!).

    Thanks once again for responding. If only my GP would be this helpful!

     
    Old 06-18-2013, 01:31 PM   #12
    plymouthrock
    Junior Member
    (female)
     
    Join Date: Jun 2013
    Location: London
    Posts: 14
    plymouthrock HB User
    Re: ANTIBODY LEVELS: I would be grateful for advice

    To MidWest, if she is out there:

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by plymouthrock View Post
    Midwest1,

    Thank you so very much for your responses. I appreciate your taking the time to do so - really, thanks.

    There are two (antibodies) that can cause hypoT: anti-TPO and anti-Tg. Anti-TPO can cause pregnancy complications. Anti-Tg doesn't affect pregnancy and cannot be reduced.

    Well, I had better hope that mine, registering 1,970, were the Anti-Tg kind! I'll try to find out from doc on Thursday.

    The NHS recently re-adopted archaic standards that have handcuffed thyroid-knowledgeable practitioners from doing what they deem best for their thyroid patients. I hope you can navigate that sort of ignorance successfully.



    Would the NHS-directed restrictions be in the area of monitoring the condition adequately, or prescribing remedies for it? Are you able to be more specific about the nature of the "archaic standards"?
    Midwest, I'd love to know more about NHS restrictions if you have a moment. My GP is aggressive and dismissive if I ask him for any information - regardless how 'slight' or minor the query.

     
    Closed Thread




    Thread Tools Search this Thread
    Search this Thread:

    Advanced Search

    Posting Rules
    You may not post new threads
    You may not post replies
    You may not post attachments
    You may not edit your posts

    BB code is On
    Smilies are On
    [IMG] code is Off
    HTML code is Off
    Trackbacks are Off
    Pingbacks are Off
    Refbacks are Off




    Sign Up Today!

    Ask our community of thousands of members your health questions, and learn from others experiences. Join the conversation!

    I want my free account

    All times are GMT -7. The time now is 03:14 AM.





    2019 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved.
    Do not copy or redistribute in any form!