Discussions that mention adderall

ADD / ADHD board


Quote from ftlmatt:
since it is an amphetamine...dependence can be very high depending on the person. however if the medication is helping, i wouldn't see dependence as a big problem unless you decide to go off of it..i take dexedrine and never plan on going off of it due to it's effectiveness in treating my add/depression


I agree, I would say that it completly depends on the person who is taking the medication. I currently take 60 mg of Adderall XR and have been on it for about 7 years and I am not addicted. I also don't see myself going off of it because of how much it has helped me. There are a lot of medications out there which can be addicting, I mean i know people who have become addicted to nose spray!! I would say use your best judgement and don't abuse the medication and you should be fine. Good luck to you, hope this helps!
Quote from bknkll:
i looked through the boards for something like this but i couldn't find one, sorry if i'm bringing up an old topic:

how likely is it to develop a dependence on aderall?



Here is an interesting study I found.......

Long-term Use of Extended-Release Adderall Appears Safe, Efficacious for Adults With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder


SAN FRANCISCO, CA -- May 26, 2003 -- Once-daily Adderall XR is effective and well tolerated for the long-term treatment of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in adults, according to an interim analysis of 10-month data from an extension study.

The data were presented here on May 21st at the 156th Annual Meeting of the American Psychiatric Association.

"We were quite encouraged to see that, at this stage of the study, not only has Adderall therapy been safe and efficacious, but every patient showed improvement in core symptoms of the condition, with no evidence of an emerging drug tolerance," said presenter and investigator Richard Weisler, MD, psychiatric researcher at Duke University Medical School in Durham, North Carolina, United States. Dr. Weisler is also in private practice in Raleigh, North Carolina.

The investigators enrolled 223 adults with a mean age of 39.8 years who had participated in a 4-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, forced-dose titration study of once-daily Adderall XR. During the initial study, the researchers titrated dosing to determine optimal therapeutic effects with minimum adverse events. All subjects met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual IV (DSM-IV) criteria for ADHD and had a history of the condition prior to age 7.

For the extension study, the investigators took monthly vital signs and adverse event reports. They collected electrocardiographic data and laboratory measures at months 3 and 6 and at 12-month end point. They assessed ongoing treatment efficacy each month using the 18-item ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS) for adults.

The criteria for inclusion in the extension study included at least 1 week of treatment in the antecedent study; 21 of the subjects in the extension study met that criterion but had a time-gap in Adderall treatment prior to the beginning of the extension study.

Results of the extension study show that the 57 patients who had received placebo during the initial study had the greatest improvement in ADHD-RS scores from baseline to interim end point, with a mean change of -11.9 (P<0.001). Patients who took Adderall XR with interruption (n=21) during the initial study had significant improvement in ADHD-RS scores from baseline to end point, with a mean change of -7.6 (P=0.041), as did the 145 patients with no interruption (mean change -6.0; P<0.001).

The most common adverse events were dry mouth, reported by 42% of treated patients; anorexia (30%); insomnia (25%); and headache (21%).

"Every subject has shown ongoing improvement in symptoms at this 10-month point," Dr. Weisler added.

He also said that the incidence of commonly reported adverse events has dropped over time during the study.
There is a world of difference between physical dependancy and addiction; addiction is a behavior whereas physical dependancy is not. These drugs can cause dependancy, adverse reactions, future mental/physical health problems over time.

Studies that declare "safe" vary on what one's definition of safe is...no death from Adderall but instead a future heart condition could be considered "safe" now, couldn't it? And who pays for these studies but the drug companies themselves. Another question, how many adverse event clinical studies get published, since that is usually up to the ones who run the show...for example, there is already a major news story out there about bad result clinical trials on AD's for kids that did not get published in medical journals, but rather filed away, basically the public was not informed of the results.There is alot of deception going on/has been going on which is just now surfacing in the mainstream media, although these stories have been around for a long time.
Quote from Jennita:
There is a world of difference between physical dependancy and addiction; addiction is a behavior whereas physical dependancy is not. These drugs can cause dependancy, adverse reactions, future mental/physical health problems over time.

Studies that declare "safe" vary on what one's definition of safe is...no death from Adderall but instead a future heart condition could be considered "safe" now, couldn't it? And who pays for these studies but the drug companies themselves. Another question, how many adverse event clinical studies get published, since that is usually up to the ones who run the show...for example, there is already a major news story out there about bad result clinical trials on AD's for kids that did not get published in medical journals, but rather filed away, basically the public was not informed of the results.There is alot of deception going on/has been going on which is just now surfacing in the mainstream media, although these stories have been around for a long time.


i'll tell u that living with and dealing with add/depression for as long as i can remember, i will take my chances on taking medication that gave me my life back.
i don't bielieve in that deception thing. that is like saying when the tobacco industry lied about nicotine being addictive. any sensible person could have came to their own conclusion that nicotine was addictive..i didn't need anyone to tell me that! it's called common sense and that goes for any other medication. it is up to the consumer to find out for themselves both the negatives and positives of taking medications. those who rely on the drug companies or any other opinion is just looking for someone else to blame for their laziness and not doing their own research. we are not babies and we have access to the internet and a variety of other research tools.