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ADD / ADHD board


Lisa, when I looked on Amazon, it looks like the book is all about kids with SIDs. Would the book include information on dealing with ADHD because that is definitely what Cooper has? He takes Strattera and Adderall RX to manage his symptoms.

His teacher was well aware at the beginning of second grade what was going on with him, but she focuses on the negative and is not good on informing me when problems occur until they reach a breaking point. This is after numerous discussions I have had with her regarding keeping me aware. Sometimes he behaves really well at home and not at school. She is aware of this too. I want to give her a book that will help her understand. There is another little boy in his class with Ashperger's (sp?). He is very quite though so he doesn't cause a problem, where as my son is all over the place when his medicine is not working.

What kind of test determine whether or not it's sensory instead of ADHD?

Many thanks,
Vanessa
Hi folks,

Just wanted to clearify a bit on the book I mentioned. This book deals *IN DETAIL* sensory intergration dysfunction. It is not written toward ADD/HD outside of the fact that often ADD/HD children have SID as well and many families are not aware of this... Including myself until a few months ago.

However, it is my personal experiance and the experiance of families around me that led me to believe that SID is a HUGE factor for ADD/HD children.

Meds like Strattera (although a non stimulant), Adderall RX, Concerta all deliver external stimuli to the nerves system, allowing the child/adult to be able to attend to task rather than seek stimuli externally (ie: movement, touching, etc).

By teaching Jenny she can either provide needed stimuli or in some cases reducing it she has more control over the situation.

She often studies and reads hanging over the end of her bed with the book on the floor and swings her legs as she goes. This position helps her receive and organize incoming information better therefore she remembers it better. When I was making her sit at the desk, she had problems with recall because she was moving around so much.

She will stay in her seat for a few seconds after the bell to change classes, allowing the "crush" of people as she calls it to move past the doorway. This keeps her from feeling closter phobic/panicked at the start of the next class. By controlling the number of bodies "crushing" her during class changes she arrives at her next class without a feeling of panic. This in turn allows her to focus more fully on the materials presented at the start of class.

I know that your little guy is young and doesn't change classes but, he still has situations that he has to deal with every day. By understanding what drives his behavior in a given situation you may be able to help him learn to deal with the "trigger" before or as it is happening.

If he's getting into trouble because he can't stay in his seat during quiet time, maybe a weighted lap pad or book across his legs. He would have to move the weight in order to get up, the lap pad is a reminder that this is a time I need to remain in my seat or maybe he can erase the chalkboard before settling down for quiet time - this would allow him a quick stretch and bit of movement. Or if he sits in the back of the class maybe the movement of his classmates in front of him distracts him. If this were the case I would ask if he could be moved to the head of the row - removing the visual stimuli in front of him.

To answer your about how to find out if he truly has SID you can contact an Occupational Therapist trained in SID to evaluate him. There are children who are placed on meds for ADD/HD who once they start working with a therapist and learn some behavior modifications can come off meds and do very well!

Jenny has been off Concerta since Nov. 03 and doing great! We did run into the whole panic thing during and following class changes (as a side note we determined the panic is worse during her cycle) - but with just a little knowledge and change in her own behavior she has over come that problem.

It takes talking to your child in detail about why they are doing what they do... :) Hang in there Vanessa, you and Cooper do great I'm sure! You are doing the right thing by him in seeking answers! Be ready to have this conversation over and over for awhile. At first he may not be able or willing to tell you what does it. I got, ..."I don't know" over and over again.

Until I found a better way to ask - rather then "Jenny, why can't you sit at the desk for even 2 minutes?" to which I always got "I don't know" - I asked her, "How are you most comfortable when you study, what do you think helps you remember best?" to which I got "After I run or rollerblade for a bit and working on the floor!" I can go with that. I let her run before homework and she does it hanging upside down!

Check the book out at the library first run through the checklists. I found that I could identify with many of these issues in myself!

Love and light to all our children.

Lisa and kids