Discussions that mention atenolol

High & Low Blood Pressure board


Hi Storm, :)

I typed a reply to your post and my CAT has lost it. He hit the keyboard with his paw before I could post my reply. Oh well. I'll re-type most of it and watch the cat this time. He appears to be sleeping directly above the keyboard. :rolleyes:

The withholding of beta blockers prior to stress testing of any kind - pharmacological- thalium or dobutamine, or exercise stress testing, remains controversial.
Most doctors prefer to stop beta blocker therapy prior to the test. 24 hours is the norm for propranolol, while the longer lasting drugs such as metoprolol and atenolol may require longer periods of withdrawal of therapy of up to several days. This is because besides the effect these drugs usually have on the heart rate, there often are other prolonged effects on cardiac function.

The reasoning behind stopping the medication is that if the patients are stable enough to undergo the test, they should be able to tolerate short periods of beta blocker withdrawal. This does not uniformly apply to people with CHD or CAD, who are given specific instructions if their beta blocker therapy is withdrawn prior to the test. In people who are on beta blockers at the time of the test, there is a higher false negative rate. It has been shown that other long-acting drugs, such as calcium channel blockers and long-acting nitrates- can also impair the test outcome. I've had mine done both ways, while on beta blockers (dobutamine), and without (exercise).
I wish you luck. The fact that all your other tests showed nothing is a very good news. A good stress test result will be the icing on the cake. :) Let us know how it goes.

flowergirl
[QUOTE]Hi Storm,

I typed a reply to your post and my CAT has lost it. He hit the keyboard with his paw before I could post my reply. Oh well. I'll re-type most of it and watch the cat this time. He appears to be sleeping directly above the keyboard.

The withholding of beta blockers prior to stress testing of any kind - pharmacological- thalium or dobutamine, or exercise stress testing, remains controversial.
Most doctors prefer to stop beta blocker therapy prior to the test. 24 hours is the norm for propranolol, while the longer lasting drugs such as metoprolol and atenolol may require longer periods of withdrawal of therapy of up to several days. This is because besides the effect these drugs usually have on the heart rate, there often are other prolonged effects on cardiac function.

The reasoning behind stopping the medication is that if the patients are stable enough to undergo the test, they should be able to tolerate short periods of beta blocker withdrawal. This does not uniformly apply to people with CHD or CAD, who are given specific instructions if their beta blocker therapy is withdrawn prior to the test. In people who are on beta blockers at the time of the test, there is a higher false negative rate. It has been shown that other long-acting drugs, such as calcium channel blockers and long-acting nitrates- can also impair the test outcome. I've had mine done both ways, while on beta blockers (dobutamine), and without (exercise).
I wish you luck. The fact that all your other tests showed nothing is a very good news. A good stress test result will be the icing on the cake. Let us know how it goes.

flowergirl

Thanks again for more information :) Now I wonder if Coreg is needed to taper down as well as atenolol and metoprolol. I've been on atenolol before and can attest to its withdrawal affects. I see on some drug sites that Carvedilol/Coreg is an alpha/beta blocker, but others do not. I wonder which it really is? It seems pretty strong.

[QUOTE]I've been doing some reading on nutrition due to the connection with hypertension. From what I understand, these symptoms can occur when a magnesium deficiency is present. Mag deficiencies don't show up readily in lab tests...and diuretics can be contributing factors to mag/electrolyte imbalances, but other factors can impact mag imbalances as well (calcium intake, genetics, etc.).

I haven't pursued this information in depth, but I thought I'd mention the possibility. It is something I believe I experienced when on hct...not the chest discomfort, but just about every other symptom.

The other thing I thought I'd mention is that I've never had heart concerns but I did experience chest pains around the time I was on a beta blocker. I do think there was a correlation.

Bethsheba

Hi beth! Great to see you're back on the forum :) I've read a bit about that as well and wonder about maybe taking supplements, at about 250 mg. Women need about 310 per day but you can get it from a lot of foods naturally, like nuts and bananas. I think spinach is loaded in it too. I also read that magnesium deficiency seems to be overlooked in electrolyte testing and it's actually more common than most people believe.

These pains, though, seem to come close to my TOM and somewhat go away when it starts. It feels like an achy, to sharp stabbing sensations in my sternum and extends into my ribs on both sides, and even is felt in my collarbone at times, again on both sides. Sometimes I can gently press on my ribs and they feel a bit tender and hurt. I've heard that fibro does this too but never talked to my rheumatologist about it.