Discussions that mention avandamet

Diabetes board


As a long-time Type 2 diabetic who is now on an insulin pump, I just wanted to say that I couldn't agree more with you, Almonkey. It is particularly disturbing to me how many doctors do not take Type 2 seriously enough!

When I was diagnosed, back in the 80's, they only had one basic type of oral medication, which made your pancreas increase its output of insulin. Those old medications (sulfonuryeas) actually increased the progression of T2 by wearing out the pancreas even more quickly.

Nowadays, with the advent of medications such as Glucophage and Avandamet, which work by decreasing the body's insulin resistance, the necessity for going on insulin can be delayed a lot longer.

However, the progression of T2 is different for each individual, as is the stage at which diagnosis occurs. So, if you've tried diet,exercise, and oral medications and your doctor says you need insulin, don't feel as if you are a failure because of that. It's not YOU that has failed, it's your pancreas. And, as Almonkey has pointed out, it's far, far better to take shots (even 4-6 a day, which is what I was doing before the pump) than to suffer heart disease, kidney disease, possible stomach problems like gastroparesis, diabetic neuropathy, amputations, eye problems (retinopathy and/or blindness). All of these things can be prevented with tight control, and sometimes tight control can only be achieved with insulin.

Ruth
As a long-time Type 2 diabetic who is now on an insulin pump, I just wanted to say that I couldn't agree more with you, Almonkey. It is particularly disturbing to me how many doctors do not take Type 2 seriously enough!

When I was diagnosed, back in the 80's, they only had one basic type of oral medication, which made your pancreas increase its output of insulin. Those old medications (sulfonuryeas) actually increased the progression of T2 by wearing out the pancreas even more quickly.

Nowadays, with the advent of medications such as Glucophage and Avandamet, which work by decreasing the body's insulin resistance, the necessity for going on insulin can be delayed a lot longer.

However, the progression of T2 is different for each individual, as is the stage at which diagnosis occurs. So, if you've tried diet,exercise, and oral medications and your doctor says you need insulin, don't feel as if you are a failure because of that. It's not YOU that has failed, it's your pancreas. And, as Almonkey has pointed out, it's far, far better to take shots (even 4-6 a day, which is what I was doing before the pump) than to suffer heart disease, kidney disease, possible stomach problems like gastroparesis, diabetic neuropathy, amputations, eye problems (retinopathy and/or blindness). All of these things can be prevented with tight control, and sometimes tight control can only be achieved with insulin. Don't think of insulin as your enemy, but rather as your friend that will keep you healthy!

Ruth