Discussions that mention cialis

Cancer: Prostate board


Sounds kind of like me - I was diagnosed about a year ago at age 48 - PSA 4.6 and Gleason 3+3 = 6. I had 2 of 12 positive samples on my biopsy.

Here's my story - reading stuff like this in advance was a big help so I'll do the same for you:
I'm in WV and chose to have my surgery here at a hospital about a mile from my house - regular RRP (not robotic or lapro) by my urologist who's also a med school surgery and urology professor. I gave 2 units of blood for my surgery and needed them both. I had surgery last July 23 (a Monday) and went home on Thursday - the bowels didn't restart until Wednesday. After surgery all signs were that they got it all - margins clear, no involvement of seminal vesicles or vas defrens.

I had a catheter for 3 weeks. After it came out my urethra closed up. They put the catheter back in for 2 weeks but it closed up again after it came out the 2nd time. This 'urethral stricture' happens sometimes - not an uncommon side effect of the surgery.

I dealt with self-catheter use for several months. My uro tried 'filliform and follower' treatment to open things up in January of this year.. Things opened up in February and I haven't used the catheter since. There is still a small problem with the bladder neck area - I can't urinate sitting down and it also doesn't flow well standing up, but in a crouching or 'hovering' position over the toilet it flows the best. My urine flow is slow and it takes 3-5 minutes to empty completely but it seems to have stabilized and I don't want any other procedures done that may cause incontinence. Again, this stricture and the continuing inconvience while uriniating is not common - most men are continent and urinate just fine. Also, I haven't worn pads for 4-5 months now....

My nerves were spared during the surgery. I tried some Cialis a few times but didn't like the nasal congestion side effect - it made my snoring much worse. My erections returned over the last 2 months or so without any medication - they're a little slower to happen but once they do they're quite 'usuable'. :)

And the best news - my PSA had been undetectable in two tests since the surgery - next test will be September.

Advice: Get all the information you can....feel confident in your surgeon/urologist....read all you can about living with a catheter. From your husband's age it sounds like surgery is definitely the best treatment. I'm surprised with a low PSA he had scans and other stuff done.

Consider yourself VERY LUCKY to have found the cancer at such an early age and low PSA. From all signs in your post, a complete removal of the cancer and a complete cure are a high probability.

The thing that got me through it all was knowing as much as possible about what to expect...and sharing that with family members so they could know what I was experiencing and what was next.
Quote from james_wv:
Sounds kind of like me - I was diagnosed about a year ago at age 48 - PSA 4.6 and Gleason 3+3 = 6. I had 2 of 12 positive samples on my biopsy.

Here's my story - reading stuff like this in advance was a big help so I'll do the same for you:
I'm in WV and chose to have my surgery here at a hospital about a mile from my house - regular RRP (not robotic or lapro) by my urologist who's also a med school surgery and urology professor. I gave 2 units of blood for my surgery and needed them both. I had surgery last July 23 (a Monday) and went home on Thursday - the bowels didn't restart until Wednesday. After surgery all signs were that they got it all - margins clear, no involvement of seminal vesicles or vas defrens.

I had a catheter for 3 weeks. After it came out my urethra closed up. They put the catheter back in for 2 weeks but it closed up again after it came out the 2nd time. This 'urethral stricture' happens sometimes - not an uncommon side effect of the surgery.

I dealt with self-catheter use for several months. My uro tried 'filliform and follower' treatment to open things up in January of this year.. Things opened up in February and I haven't used the catheter since. There is still a small problem with the bladder neck area - I can't urinate sitting down and it also doesn't flow well standing up, but in a crouching or 'hovering' position over the toilet it flows the best. My urine flow is slow and it takes 3-5 minutes to empty completely but it seems to have stabilized and I don't want any other procedures done that may cause incontinence. Again, this stricture and the continuing inconvience while uriniating is not common - most men are continent and urinate just fine. Also, I haven't worn pads for 4-5 months now....

My nerves were spared during the surgery. I tried some Cialis a few times but didn't like the nasal congestion side effect - it made my snoring much worse. My erections returned over the last 2 months or so without any medication - they're a little slower to happen but once they do they're quite 'usuable'. :)

And the best news - my PSA had been undetectable in two tests since the surgery - next test will be September.

Advice: Get all the information you can....feel confident in your surgeon/urologist....read all you can about living with a catheter. From your husband's age it sounds like surgery is definitely the best treatment. I'm surprised with a low PSA he had scans and other stuff done.

Consider yourself VERY LUCKY to have found the cancer at such an early age and low PSA. From all signs in your post, a complete removal of the cancer and a complete cure are a high probability.

The thing that got me through it all was knowing as much as possible about what to expect...and sharing that with family members so they could know what I was experiencing and what was next.
Quote from james_wv:
Sounds kind of like me - I was diagnosed about a year ago at age 48 - PSA 4.6 and Gleason 3+3 = 6. I had 2 of 12 positive samples on my biopsy.

Here's my story - reading stuff like this in advance was a big help so I'll do the same for you:
I'm in WV and chose to have my surgery here at a hospital about a mile from my house - regular RRP (not robotic or lapro) by my urologist who's also a med school surgery and urology professor. I gave 2 units of blood for my surgery and needed them both. I had surgery last July 23 (a Monday) and went home on Thursday - the bowels didn't restart until Wednesday. After surgery all signs were that they got it all - margins clear, no involvement of seminal vesicles or vas defrens.

I had a catheter for 3 weeks. After it came out my urethra closed up. They put the catheter back in for 2 weeks but it closed up again after it came out the 2nd time. This 'urethral stricture' happens sometimes - not an uncommon side effect of the surgery.

I dealt with self-catheter use for several months. My uro tried 'filliform and follower' treatment to open things up in January of this year.. Things opened up in February and I haven't used the catheter since. There is still a small problem with the bladder neck area - I can't urinate sitting down and it also doesn't flow well standing up, but in a crouching or 'hovering' position over the toilet it flows the best. My urine flow is slow and it takes 3-5 minutes to empty completely but it seems to have stabilized and I don't want any other procedures done that may cause incontinence. Again, this stricture and the continuing inconvience while uriniating is not common - most men are continent and urinate just fine. Also, I haven't worn pads for 4-5 months now....

My nerves were spared during the surgery. I tried some Cialis a few times but didn't like the nasal congestion side effect - it made my snoring much worse. My erections returned over the last 2 months or so without any medication - they're a little slower to happen but once they do they're quite 'usuable'. :)

And the best news - my PSA had been undetectable in two tests since the surgery - next test will be September.

Advice: Get all the information you can....feel confident in your surgeon/urologist....read all you can about living with a catheter. From your husband's age it sounds like surgery is definitely the best treatment. I'm surprised with a low PSA he had scans and other stuff done.

Consider yourself VERY LUCKY to have found the cancer at such an early age and low PSA. From all signs in your post, a complete removal of the cancer and a complete cure are a high probability.

The thing that got me through it all was knowing as much as possible about what to expect...and sharing that with family members so they could know what I was experiencing and what was next.