Discussions that mention cialis

Cancer: Prostate board


Hello Debbie - sounds like your husband is making nice progress. its going to be a long road and he will cherish your support and conversations regarding his concerns.

i wouldnt expect anything from the Cialis for multiple months. right now the focus should be on continence. his size will remain small for a while too but its not 'gone'. in time it will return. time is the hard part.

i am 43 and just passed the 4 month post-op mark.
[QUOTE=jj1963;3123688]Hello Debbie - sounds like your husband is making nice progress. its going to be a long road and he will cherish your support and conversations regarding his concerns.

i wouldnt expect anything from the Cialis for multiple months. right now the focus should be on continence. his size will remain small for a while too but its not 'gone'. in time it will return. time is the hard part.

i am 43 and just passed the 4 month post-op mark.

Hi JJ,

WOW, 43. I'm sorry! This disease is awful! Robs people of a normal "youth". Pushes our bodies well ahead in years and leaves us hurt and sad. Not the normal aging process which I hear is tough enough.

Since you are young, I'm going to ask you... This is a huge struggle for me. Friends. I feel like no one can understand what we are going through. They joke about sex, are playful, have romantic trips, and I don't fit into all of that now. My friends change the tone in their voice when they talk to me even when I try to be perky, like they feel sorry for me. I feel like they avoid us. Not sure if its the mortality wake up call or that our lives are different now, but they do. They don't know what to say to us. We are different and I hate it.

I feel ashamed or embarassed, not sure which, but I tell no one. No neighbors, no one. I get upset if my husband does. It just means more people that treat us differently.

I feel like I belong with the senior citizens but I'm only 49. I'm stuck without a peer group.

Did you go through this? Are you going through this? Any suggestions?

Congrats on the 4 month mark! Here's to many many months of clean PSA tests for you!!!

Debbie
Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Surgery Far less When Performed by Specialist ...........
Many men with prostate cancer may endanger their lives by avoiding prostate removal, unwilling to deal with the surgery's reported side effects. Now, in a study reported in the January issue of Urology, Johns Hopkins researchers conclude that when patients seek out a surgeon highly experienced in the procedure, they are far more likely to remain continent and potent than if their operations were done by a less experienced doctor. In addition, the study's potency and continency rates are the highest ever reported after prostate removal.
"There is no better way to cure cancer that is confined to the prostate than total surgical removal of the prostate," says Patrick Walsh, M.D., director of the Brady Urological Institute and lead author of the study. "And at a high-volume center of excellence, the side effects of radical prostatectomy are minimal and the outcome is quite good."

In the early 1980s, Walsh discovered that the nerves that run to the corpora cavernosa, the spongy, erectile bodies in the penis, sit outside the capsule of the prostate. This led Walsh to develop nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy.

Many men, however, still decline to have the surgery because of high rates of reported side effects in the bedroom and bathroom arena. Doctors at several centers, Walsh notes, report that one year after the surgery, only 50 percent of their patients are continent and between 10 and 30 percent are potent. These figures disagree with findings from several centers of excellence, where up to 93 percent of patients report continency and 65 percent report potency.

Until now, these discrepancies have been attributed to different methods of data collection. It appeared that patients reported worse side effects when they answered via an anonymous patient questionnaire than when they reported directly to the doctor. When asked directly, some doctors hypothesized, patients may not be as forthcoming with the truth because they don't want to disappoint their doctors or, perhaps, surgeons have an unconscious bias toward minimizing adverse outcomes.

To more accurately identify side effect rates, anonymous patient questionnaires were distributed by an independent third party to 64 men with prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy as well as three, six, 12 and 18 months after the surgery. The researchers found that when patients were asked at 12 months whether they had a problem with urinary control, 98 percent said they did not have a problem or, if they had a problem, it was small. At 18 months, 86 percent of the men reported being potent. The recovery of sexual function varied with age: 100 percent in men 30 to 39 years of age; 88 percent in men 40 to 49; 90 percent in men 50 to 59; and 75 percent in men 60 to 67.

"This is a demanding operation," says Walsh. "Patients who feel that radical prostatectomy is the best treatment for their condition should seek out physicians who do a lot of them, if not exclusively."

The prostate is a muscular, walnut-shaped gland about an inch and a half long that sits directly under the bladder. Its main function is to produce part of the fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, striking more than 175,000 men in the United States each year. For more information about nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, visit [url]http://urology.jhu.edu/surgical_techniques/radical_prostatectomy/index.html[/url].

Other authors of the study include Penny Marschke, Deborah Ricker and Arthur L. Burnett.
[QUOTE=GBINAB;3123834]Side Effects of Prostate Cancer Surgery Far less When Performed by Specialist ...........
Many men with prostate cancer may endanger their lives by avoiding prostate removal, unwilling to deal with the surgery's reported side effects. Now, in a study reported in the January issue of Urology, Johns Hopkins researchers conclude that when patients seek out a surgeon highly experienced in the procedure, they are far more likely to remain continent and potent than if their operations were done by a less experienced doctor. In addition, the study's potency and continency rates are the highest ever reported after prostate removal.
"There is no better way to cure cancer that is confined to the prostate than total surgical removal of the prostate," says Patrick Walsh, M.D., director of the Brady Urological Institute and lead author of the study. "And at a high-volume center of excellence, the side effects of radical prostatectomy are minimal and the outcome is quite good."

In the early 1980s, Walsh discovered that the nerves that run to the corpora cavernosa, the spongy, erectile bodies in the penis, sit outside the capsule of the prostate. This led Walsh to develop nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy.

Many men, however, still decline to have the surgery because of high rates of reported side effects in the bedroom and bathroom arena. Doctors at several centers, Walsh notes, report that one year after the surgery, only 50 percent of their patients are continent and between 10 and 30 percent are potent. These figures disagree with findings from several centers of excellence, where up to 93 percent of patients report continency and 65 percent report potency.

Until now, these discrepancies have been attributed to different methods of data collection. It appeared that patients reported worse side effects when they answered via an anonymous patient questionnaire than when they reported directly to the doctor. When asked directly, some doctors hypothesized, patients may not be as forthcoming with the truth because they don't want to disappoint their doctors or, perhaps, surgeons have an unconscious bias toward minimizing adverse outcomes.

To more accurately identify side effect rates, anonymous patient questionnaires were distributed by an independent third party to 64 men with prostate cancer before radical prostatectomy as well as three, six, 12 and 18 months after the surgery. The researchers found that when patients were asked at 12 months whether they had a problem with urinary control, 98 percent said they did not have a problem or, if they had a problem, it was small. At 18 months, 86 percent of the men reported being potent. The recovery of sexual function varied with age: 100 percent in men 30 to 39 years of age; 88 percent in men 40 to 49; 90 percent in men 50 to 59; and 75 percent in men 60 to 67.

"This is a demanding operation," says Walsh. "Patients who feel that radical prostatectomy is the best treatment for their condition should seek out physicians who do a lot of them, if not exclusively."

The prostate is a muscular, walnut-shaped gland about an inch and a half long that sits directly under the bladder. Its main function is to produce part of the fluid for semen. Prostate cancer is the most common male cancer, striking more than 175,000 men in the United States each year. For more information about nerve-sparing radical prostatectomy, visit [url]http://urology.jhu.edu/surgical_techniques/radical_prostatectomy/index.html[/url].

Other authors of the study include Penny Marschke, Deborah Ricker and Arthur L. Burnett.

Good article

Dr. Klein is a Urological Oncologist. Won't take patients until diagnosed with PC.

He only treats PC. No other cancer.

I was shocked to find out (when we met with him, he told us) that he is only 51. He has been one of the leaders in this for a long time, even 15 years ago, which made him VERY young at the time to be so famous.

It's difficult to get him. Thankfully a friend got us in quickly with him. Very quickly. In a week. And the surgery, was a week and a half later.

Maybe that is part of the shock for me. No time to absorb everything. It all happened to quickly... which is good for my husband. The disease was moderate aggressive for him and was spreading quickly. 6 months ago, there was none, now, the one side was terrible to the point that that nerve bundle was sacrificed.

So, I guess I should feel lucky. Should. Not there yet.

Debbie