Discussions that mention cyclobenzaprine

Pain Management board


Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
morphine and zonisamide

MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
morphine and tramadol

GENERALLY AVOID: Tramadol may reinitiate physical dependence in patients who are dependent on opioid drugs or precipitate withdrawal symptoms in patients who have recently received large doses of such drugs. In addition, additive CNS-depressant effects may occur when tramadol and other opioid drugs are administered concurrently. MANAGEMENT: Tramadol should be avoided in opioid-dependent patients and administered cautiously to patients who have recently received large doses of opioids. Dosage adjustments may be required in patients concurrently receiving opioids. Patients should be monitored for withdrawal symptoms (e.g., tremors, anxiety, sweating, nausea, diarrhea, or insomnia) and excess CNS depression.



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
morphine and nortriptyline

MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
morphine and zonisamide

MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
morphine and tramadol

GENERALLY AVOID: Tramadol may reinitiate physical dependence in patients who are dependent on opioid drugs or precipitate withdrawal symptoms in patients who have recently received large doses of such drugs. In addition, additive CNS-depressant effects may occur when tramadol and other opioid drugs are administered concurrently. MANAGEMENT: Tramadol should be avoided in opioid-dependent patients and administered cautiously to patients who have recently received large doses of opioids. Dosage adjustments may be required in patients concurrently receiving opioids. Patients should be monitored for withdrawal symptoms (e.g., tremors, anxiety, sweating, nausea, diarrhea, or insomnia) and excess CNS depression.



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
nortriptyline and tramadol

MONITOR: The risk of seizures may be increased during coadministration of tramadol with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), neuroleptic agents, opioids, tricyclic antidepressants, other tricyclic compounds (e.g., cyclobenzaprine), and/or any substance that can reduce the seizure threshold. These agents are often individually epileptogenic, with potentially additive effects. Many of these agents also exhibit CNS- and/or respiratory-depressant effects, which may be enhanced during their concomitant use with tramadol. MANAGEMENT: Caution is advised if tramadol is administered with any substance that can reduce the seizure threshold, particularly in the elderly and in patients with epilepsy, a history of seizures, or other risk factors for seizures (e.g., head trauma, metabolic disorders, alcohol and drug withdrawal, CNS infections).



Moderate Interaction -- Drug-Drug
zonisamide and tramadol

MONITOR: Central nervous system- and/or respiratory-depressant effects may be additively or synergistically increased in patients taking multiple drugs that cause these effects, especially in elderly or debilitated patients. MANAGEMENT: During concomitant use of these drugs, patients should be monitored for potentially excessive or prolonged CNS and respiratory depression. Ambulatory patients should be made aware of the possibility of additive CNS effects (e.g., drowsiness, dizziness, lightheadedness, confusion) and counseled to avoid activities requiring mental alertness until they know how these agents affect them. Patients should also be advised to notify their physician if they experience excessive or prolonged CNS effects that interfere with their normal activities.

Don't panic, because this lists all possible DI, it doesn't mean you will expereince them all but he is taking alot of drugs tha effect serritonin levels which can cause serritonin syndrome.
Good luck, Dave