Discussions that mention lidoderm

Pain Management board


amputation should only be done if your foot is actually dying, not to treat pain, especially nerve pain. that won't solve the problem. you will still have pain and it may make it worse if you cut off the nerves conducting the pain to begin with. phantom pain happens because the body believes the foot is still there and still transmits pain.

i would consider switching doctors. i don't think they sound up to date at all.

i also agree with switching to lyrica, although it too has side effects. you need to be sure it is safe with your blood pressure problems and don't take it if you have any heart problems. but lyrica is great for nerve pain - one of the best out there. you might also want to try it with cymbalta, an antidepressive that has had some effect with nerve pain.

klonopin isn't in the same class and is not comparable to morphine. it treats a different set symptoms and also has a lot of side effects, including false memory syndrome. i don't recommend it at all. it is more along the lines of a sedative. it is like comparing apples to oranges.

oh, and the lidoderm patch might do wonders for you or the cream. ask about the patch
Quote from msswank95:
amputation should only be done if your foot is actually dying, not to treat pain, especially nerve pain. that won't solve the problem. you will still have pain and it may make it worse if you cut off the nerves conducting the pain to begin with. phantom pain happens because the body believes the foot is still there and still transmits pain.

i would consider switching doctors. i don't think they sound up to date at all.

i also agree with switching to lyrica, although it too has side effects. you need to be sure it is safe with your blood pressure problems and don't take it if you have any heart problems. but lyrica is great for nerve pain - one of the best out there. you might also want to try it with cymbalta, an antidepressive that has had some effect with nerve pain.

klonopin isn't in the same class and is not comparable to morphine. it treats a different set symptoms and also has a lot of side effects, including false memory syndrome. i don't recommend it at all. it is more along the lines of a sedative. it is like comparing apples to oranges.

oh, and the lidoderm patch might do wonders for you or the cream. ask about the patch


I am going to have to disagree with you on Klonopin. As, I am sure many others on this board will.

Klonopin is a benzodiazepine, while it is normally used for social anxiety at dosages of 0.5-1mg per day, it is also WIDELY used and highly sucessful in the treatment of NERVE PAIN.

The correlation between Klonopin and it's nerve-pain-reducing function is nothing new. It was discovered in the mid 1970's at the University of Arizona by Dr. Harkins.

It is widely precribed for ALL types of nerve pain. It has a long history of sucess, unlike neurontin, and has a low side-effect profile, even when compared to Lyrica which is relatively safe.

A bit of research will show the multitude of published studies on the pain relieving effects of Klonopin at higher dosages such as 6 to 8, to 10 mg's per day. This is a dosage that is far higher than what would be normally used for social-anxiety or agoraphobia.

However, Klonopin has a much higher sucess rate at treating nerve pain, than does Lyrica as most patients are not resistant to benzodiazepine drugs.

As a testament to Klonopin, it is used for nerve pain at some of the most prestigious pain clinics in the world: Cedar Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles, which is run by Dr. Graff-Radford, The Mayo Clinic in Scottsdale, AZ: Dr. DeLu , Columbia Presbyterian: Dr. Brown (one of the worlds leading experts on nerve pain, if not the leading expert on nerve pain, after having invented and patented several new generation neurostimulators that far surpass the capabilities of the medtronic units on the market today) etc.

Any Board Certified Pain Specialist will be the first to admit that Klonopin is a great nerve agent. It works on the chloride channels of the nerve, in a similiar fashion to Lyrica, but it also has anti-anxiety effects, and hypnotic effects which slow the action potentials of the nerve.

After 30 years of trials, Klonopin has certainly proved it's worth in the treatment of nerve pain.

You are correct though comparing Klonopin to Morphine is comparing apples to oranges. But, in the case of nerve pain, using an opiod is a "second line of defense" when drugs such as tegretol, lyrica, Klonopin, and other nerve agents fail to deal with the peripheral or sympathetic nervous system's issue in shutting down the nerve which is generally the cause of nerve pain syndromes.

Thus, when such measures fail, opiate analgesics are prescribed which only act on the CNS, and are a "back-door" approach to the treatment of nerve pain.

But please do not take my word for it, ask your Pain Management Doctor.

Good luck,
Eric