Discussions that mention spironolactone

High & Low Blood Pressure board


Hi Beth,

[QUOTE]I am now aware of the role of potassium in the diet and make a conscious effort to have at least 2 fruits first thing in the am. I really believe that this simple change and my cpap have made a major contribution to reducing my bp (since, as you know, I am still living with the weight I gained on bp meds).

I am so glad to hear that! We must be aware of the importance of maintaining the right balance of potassium for our well-being and the problems that either too high or too low serum potassium concentration causes.

I forgot to mention the antihypertensive drugs which cause hyperkalemia in the previous post. People with normal kidney function can get hyperkalemia regardless of whether these drugs are used singly or in a combination. It is up to our doctors to monitor the electrolyte levels regularly when we take these drugs.
Potassium-building antihypertensive drugs are: ACE inhibitors, Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), potassium-sparing diuretics and beta blockers.
A combination therapy of ACE inhibitors and spironolactone can result in a life-threatening situation.

Glad you eat fruit on regular basis! You are doing yourself a favor. I read about obstructive sleep apnea and CPap mask in one of my books. It was really interesting and also very scary. There were drawings of the mechanism that causes people to stop breathing. It is a frequent cause of hypertension and often goes unrecognized. The consequences of an untreated apnea can be deadly. I wonder how come we so seldom hear about this condition that causes hypertension in so many people? It's almost as if doctors forget it exists. I have to ask whether you've managed to get your mask fixed. I hope it's working again! :)

flowergirl
[QUOTE=flowergirl2day;3426616]...I forgot to mention the antihypertensive drugs which cause hyperkalemia ...Potassium-building antihypertensive drugs are: ACE inhibitors, Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), potassium-sparing diuretics and beta blockers.
A combination therapy of ACE inhibitors and spironolactone can result in a life-threatening situation.

Hi Flowergirl,

So very glad you mentioned this...when looking for this kind of info, it is sometimes difficult to find all in one spot!

[QUOTE]...I read about obstructive sleep apnea and CPap mask in one of my books...It is a frequent cause of hypertension and often goes unrecognized. The consequences of an untreated apnea can be deadly.

Yes, it can be deadly. I often thought of starting a thread titled "the other silent killer". Oh, and I have recently read that they have recorded bp of 250/150 during an apnea!!! The great thing is that treatment (often a cpap machine) is med free, low mainenance and can prevent/reduce/eliminate hypertension, cardiovasuclar disease, acid reflux, diabetes, and can improve one's mental health!

[QUOTE]... I wonder how come we so seldom hear about this condition that causes hypertension in so many people? It's almost as if doctors forget it exists....

It's because it is a relatively new field of medicine...I have read that before being diagnosed with sleep apnea, patients have had symptoms of this condition for an average of seven years and during this time they have reported seeing a family physician about 17 times and a specialist about 9 times. Doctors get very little training about the signs and symtoms of sleep apnea (about 15 minutes worth) and as a result if often goes undiagnosed.

Scientists are now aware of what an important role sleep apnea plays in one's health and there is an effort out to educate the docs, but many docs don't read the literature. I'm trying to do my best to pass on what I know, but because the symptoms happen when a person is sleeping, people are not aware that they have the problem...and they don't identify "hypertension" as a symptom...often, in my opinion, because the doc tells them their condition is hereditary.

Oh, and two things...there are several kinds of apnea...if you're referring to a "mechanism" causing the apnea, you're referring to obstuctive apnea (there are acutually many different "mechanisms" possible). But there is another type that is caused by brain chemistry and that wouldn't be able to be seen in a diagram. People with the "brain chemistry" apnea, may not snore.

Also wanted to say that there is a lot of info regarding circadian rhythms and sleep, so you'll be coming across that sooner or later since your latest reads seems to be in that area.

But better get back to topic. I promised Beerzoids I'd address sleep apnea in a thread so I had better do so one of these days.

Again, thanks for your insights.

Bethsheba