Discussions that mention valium

Addiction & Recovery board


To begin with, Klonopin is a very serious drug in its own right. It is a benzodiazapin like Valium, Librium and Zanax. It is addictive, and withdrawal is extremely dangerous. It should also never be combined with alcohol. It was not clear from your post that you are still taking the Klonopin. A drug like this is useful to treat convulsive disorders, but is really a poor way to treat anxiety for anything longer than a few days.

It seems possible to me that the Klonopin triggered your drug-seeking behavior, the drug in this case being alcohol. From what you described, you are using alcohol to medicate yourself. This is not social drinking. You also say that your husband is concerned. Another sign of an alcohol problem. Finally, it sounds as though you are preoccupied with alcohol - a symptom of psychological if not physical addiction. Even with the little bit of information you gave, you are clearly abusing alcohol.

The label "alcoholism" is often misunderstood. The real definition is something like, "If you experience problems in any significant area of your life due to alcohol and these problems continue for a period of time, you are an alcoholic." Notice it does not say how much you drink, or how often you drink. Alcoholics are people who are unable to change their drinking behavior despite their attempts to do so.

We do not understand why addiction gets triggered in some people and not others. Unfortunately, it makes alcoholism almost impossible to prevent since we don't know who is susceptible until it has already occured. This may change in the future, but that's where things are at now.

I would urge you to make an appointment with a licensed addiction counselor, not a shrink or psychotherapist. You need a thorough assessment of your alcohol abuse problem. If you have progressed to addiction, you should seek "primary" treatment, meaning treatment that focuses on your drug and alcohol use, not your anxiety.

This is a tough problem, and it is an illness. There is no shame in having an illness, but you do need to take concrete steps to prevent it from ruining your life. You have already taken a big step posting on this board, and I congratulate you for it. I am confident that if you are willing to take further steps, you can recover and be better than ever!

Gary Olson
Duluth, MN
Quote from viking55803:
To begin with, Klonopin is a very serious drug in its own right. It is a benzodiazapin like Valium, Librium and Zanax. It is addictive, and withdrawal is extremely dangerous. It should also never be combined with alcohol. It was not clear from your post that you are still taking the Klonopin. A drug like this is useful to treat convulsive disorders, but is really a poor way to treat anxiety for anything longer than a few days.

It seems possible to me that the Klonopin triggered your drug-seeking behavior, the drug in this case being alcohol. From what you described, you are using alcohol to medicate yourself. This is not social drinking. You also say that your husband is concerned. Another sign of an alcohol problem. Finally, it sounds as though you are preoccupied with alcohol - a symptom of psychological if not physical addiction. Even with the little bit of information you gave, you are clearly abusing alcohol.

The label "alcoholism" is often misunderstood. The real definition is something like, "If you experience problems in any significant area of your life due to alcohol and these problems continue for a period of time, you are an alcoholic." Notice it does not say how much you drink, or how often you drink. Alcoholics are people who are unable to change their drinking behavior despite their attempts to do so.

We do not understand why addiction gets triggered in some people and not others. Unfortunately, it makes alcoholism almost impossible to prevent since we don't know who is susceptible until it has already occured. This may change in the future, but that's where things are at now.

I would urge you to make an appointment with a licensed addiction counselor, not a shrink or psychotherapist. You need a thorough assessment of your alcohol abuse problem. If you have progressed to addiction, you should seek "primary" treatment, meaning treatment that focuses on your drug and alcohol use, not your anxiety.

This is a tough problem, and it is an illness. There is no shame in having an illness, but you do need to take concrete steps to prevent it from ruining your life. You have already taken a big step posting on this board, and I congratulate you for it. I am confident that if you are willing to take further steps, you can recover and be better than ever!

Gary Olson
Duluth, MN


Wow. Good answer.

:)