Discussions that mention vicodin

Back Problems board


Hi Janine, and welcome to the board!

I have scoliosis, too, and have had two fusion surgeries, one at age 18 and one at age 48. I had three successful pregnancies, but life does take a toll on your back. How bad is your scoliosis? Mine is quite severe, even after my fusions, so I still have pain everyday and expect to forever. I take Vicodin, which helps, but I do need to lay down during the day at least once or twice.

If yours isn't so severe, you can probably avoid surgery, since you've gotten this far. I suggest finding a good physical therapist who specializes in back problems. There are good core strengthening exercises you can do on your own. The best case scenario would be to find a therapist who could customize them for you personally. I went to several therapists over the years, but I was always treated like an assembly line patient. After my last surgery, I asked my doctor if he knew of any therapists who specialized in spines. He knew a great one, and she was wonderful! She was able to troubleshoot particular problems I was having and teach me which muscle groups to isolate and use for those problems.

You may also need to learn to modify how you move and lift. I learned very early on how to scoop a crying toddler into my lap as I sat down, rather than always picking them up. Much easier on your back!

As for the chiropractor, if he's helping, that's okay, as long as you know you don't have other problems going on in there. They do have their time and place. Some chiropractors, though, have done permanent damage to people with real back problems (as opposed to the normal aches and pains of aging). Be careful! The therapist would be more important for the long haul, but I do understand that need for relief that a CAREFUL adjustment by a QUALIFIED chiropractor. Just please remember that even though they call themselves "doctor," they are not medical doctors!

I wish you the best! Been there, done that!

Enjoy those little ones while they're young. My oldest recently moved out on her own, and in only one more year, both of the others will be gone, one transferring to a different college farther away, and one heading into the marines as soon as he graduates high school. It feels like yesterday that I was carting them to T-ball!

Take care,
Emily
hi BlueAtlas,
Thank you so much for your response. My scoliosis is in the lower back and I don't think it is too severe but none the less still painful. I'm confused about how to excercise do I excercise the right or left or both? My spine curves to the right and I also have a bowed lower back what ever that means. I hate the fact that when you ask about home exercises it seems that no one want's to tell you so that they can get their money out of you. With a young family and being on maternity leave that just isn't financially possible especially with the cost of living now a days. I did get my x-rays however and I will be taking those to my doctor to see what she says and hopefully she will refer me to a specialist like you said. thanks
janine22[QUOTE=BlueAtlas;3599236]Hi Janine, and welcome to the board!

I have scoliosis, too, and have had two fusion surgeries, one at age 18 and one at age 48. I had three successful pregnancies, but life does take a toll on your back. How bad is your scoliosis? Mine is quite severe, even after my fusions, so I still have pain everyday and expect to forever. I take Vicodin, which helps, but I do need to lay down during the day at least once or twice.

If yours isn't so severe, you can probably avoid surgery, since you've gotten this far. I suggest finding a good physical therapist who specializes in back problems. There are good core strengthening exercises you can do on your own. The best case scenario would be to find a therapist who could customize them for you personally. I went to several therapists over the years, but I was always treated like an assembly line patient. After my last surgery, I asked my doctor if he knew of any therapists who specialized in spines. He knew a great one, and she was wonderful! She was able to troubleshoot particular problems I was having and teach me which muscle groups to isolate and use for those problems.

You may also need to learn to modify how you move and lift. I learned very early on how to scoop a crying toddler into my lap as I sat down, rather than always picking them up. Much easier on your back!

As for the chiropractor, if he's helping, that's okay, as long as you know you don't have other problems going on in there. They do have their time and place. Some chiropractors, though, have done permanent damage to people with real back problems (as opposed to the normal aches and pains of aging). Be careful! The therapist would be more important for the long haul, but I do understand that need for relief that a CAREFUL adjustment by a QUALIFIED chiropractor. Just please remember that even though they call themselves "doctor," they are not medical doctors!

I wish you the best! Been there, done that!

Enjoy those little ones while they're young. My oldest recently moved out on her own, and in only one more year, both of the others will be gone, one transferring to a different college farther away, and one heading into the marines as soon as he graduates high school. It feels like yesterday that I was carting them to T-ball!

Take care,
Emily