Discussions that mention vicoprofen

Back Problems board


Hi, I am sorry you're still having all that pain after surgery.

I would ask many of the same questions as Pepper...the best test for claudication would be her question #2...stand straight and try to bend backwards at the waist. If this also causes horrible, deep, achy cramping pains in your rear, spreading down into the backs of your thighs, that would the most common sign of neurogenic claudication. Also, another sign is the having to bend forward or leaning on shopping carts while walking or even having to bend forward while sitting; With stenosis, the bending forward is usually the only position that relieves any pain. For myself, laying down or standing straight was impossible. I had to lay in the fetal position all the time. To me, it also seems like you might have some sciatic pain. Claudication would not follow the L5 nerve root path, to my knowledge. Usually that would mean a radiculopathy, especially if it's traveling all the way to your ankle and foot. It can also radiate into your hip and thigh areas (i've had that happen as well; I had severe central canal stenosis plus disc herniations and a tear so my pain was all over the place too).

I would say pretty much the same on everything else as Pepper; it could also be vertebrae slippage due to instability; or the nerve could be extremely sensitive from surgery and may need a long time to calm down; There is alot of swelling inside after surgery, so it could be swelling that's compressing on nerves; Sometimes there are problems that arent necessarily seen while laying down on an MRI. I know it's very expensive, but maybe a standing one might be more helpful for diagnosis, though I don't know how much you could take standing up. The pain might be too much to finish an MRI. I know for me, the pain of just the lay down one was horrible and they had to keep doing it over. I was in so much pain I started trembling.

I wish I could help you more, but I guess your doc really needs to check into all the possibilities with you.

As for medications, I never really found one that helped much. I tried Vicoprofen (vicodin with ibuprofen instead of tylenol). It sort of lessened the pain slightly, but not much of a difference. I still couldnt walk or stand up. I also took a couple courses of Medrol Dose pack ( a short term day steroid treatment). Very high dose the first day, little less the next, etc..until they are done. THe first 2 days on the high doses helped a little but again, not much. The 3rd day was back to agonizing pain. I don't know if any kinds of nerve meds would help. Chances are if your canal is being compressed that much, after a while, not much is going to help with the pain. It might be worth trying some nerve meds, though....especially if it is due to being irritated from surgery or something. I think some people have mentioned Lyrica or Neurontin?

Thankfullly for myself, my surgery DID completely relieve my claudication pain. Enough laminae and bone was cut away to get rid of that pain. I did great for about 6 months, then just had some reherniations, which I just had a nerve block for. Now, though, i've already grew more bone in some places, my facet joints, and around my foramen. But so far it's not seeming to affect me in any way. But down the road I may be in for more stenosis and/or claudication But at least i know all about it now and what symptoms it has, etc....

I think you should definitely go through more testing or even go for another opionion with another specialist. It's always good to have more eyes looking at the same thing.....I really hope you find the source of the pain and it can be resolved for you!