Discussions that mention xanax

Inner Ear Disorders board


Yes I know what you mean. I have had anxiety since the day I was born. When I went to the ER with dizziness, they gave me a xanax, and told me to go home, that it was anxiety. I know that it is not. I will say that that what ever this turns out to be has definitly triggered it though. I have trouble reading, I feel dizzy and spaced out all day. I have not had a normal feeling day since march 4th. I had a normal MRI, and I am awaiting more results from an ENG.
I know that stress can cause a lot of physical probs, but I have not felt normal for one day. That is not stress. When I first went to my GP, he treated me for a sinus infection. That did not work, and he gave me a referral for a CAT Scan of the sinus. I never had it done because I ran with the inner ear idea. If the eng is noraml, that is my next step, then the be followed by an endocrinologist to test my thyroid. I doubt it is that though because I feel the pressure in my head. Do you have a pulsing heartbeat in you head pretty much constantly?

Don't knock it off to stress unless you have days of feeling okay, and even then I would still pursue an answer.
dizzygirl,

Yes, in the beginning I did have sinus/face pressure for about a week. I'm not really sure to this day what that was all about, though I had just been on a lovely cocktail of Xanax, Allegra, and a nasal steroid spray for a month (that my GP prescribed in her ignorance, but my ENT, thank God, took me off) and I stopped taking them cold turkey. Then I had the pressure, so I sometimes wonder if my head wasn't reacting to no more drugs, particulary the Allegra, which was supposed to keep my inner ear dried out, and the nasal spray, which was supposed to reduce sinus inflammation.

And, yes, like I said above, the visual thing is SO hard to describe to others. I didn't mention, though you may have figured out, that of course my eyes checked out just fine at the optometrist's because in the end this had to do with my inner ear and not any malfunction on the part of my eyes. The brain fog/fish bowl does go away over time, though it can take a couple months or so. Everyone's different, but it does go away as things begin to calm down.

Terri
Terri & Dizzy,

My dizzyness that I have had over the last several years has never been like today. I have day's when I am just sitting on my computer at work and then I get this kind of light headed feeling. Again, I associated that with a low pulse and blood pressure problem. Not like today when my head was spinning.
The thing is that I have been to several ENT's and they say that it is NOT my ears. Although my ears feel constantly full and even sometimes I can feel what I think is fluid in my ears. I just don't understand what triggered this this morning. Like I said I am o.k. right now, feel kind of floaty...but nothing out of the unnormal for me. I take Zoloft and Xanax and have for years. I am so worried about a brain tumor or something wrong with my heart with all the symptoms. I know that it is just parania...
Thank you ladies sooooooooooooooooooo much
Quote from worryworttx:
Terri & Dizzy,

My dizzyness that I have had over the last several years has never been like today. I have day's when I am just sitting on my computer at work and then I get this kind of light headed feeling. Again, I associated that with a low pulse and blood pressure problem. Not like today when my head was spinning.
The thing is that I have been to several ENT's and they say that it is NOT my ears. Although my ears feel constantly full and even sometimes I can feel what I think is fluid in my ears. I just don't understand what triggered this this morning. Like I said I am o.k. right now, feel kind of floaty...but nothing out of the unnormal for me. I take Zoloft and Xanax and have for years. I am so worried about a brain tumor or something wrong with my heart with all the symptoms. I know that it is just parania...
Thank you ladies sooooooooooooooooooo much



Worrywort,

That kind of slam you back, I've drunk WAY too much and the room is actually spinning when I'm in a certain position is what BPV feels like. At first, my ENT was also leery about whether I was having an inner ear problem. I was just having the floaty, spacey, light headed stuff. We did an MRI, which turned out normal, but then a month later I had another episode of the BPV, so then we knew (I'd had one 6 months earlier, but my stupid GP told me there was nothing I could do but let the feelings subside on their own, so I didn't have an Epley at that time). Many people on this board have been through many docs, ENTs and such, who are supposed to know something about this and they don't. It may still be inner ear with you, particulary if you're having BPV symptoms. If you have BPV, then you will know for sure what triggered your feelings this morning because it is directly related to those little calcium crystals getting into the semi-circular canals of the inner ear.

Terri
Becky,

You're welcome for the info. Carrie has given a good explanation of what an endocrinologist does. What you'll get there is mostly blood tests to make sure your endocrine system (glands, etc.) is working properly. The endocrinologist was not the doctor who ended up helping me (other than making sure my blood tests were normal, so I knew the problem wasn't there). I also agree with Carrie about getting a second opinion. If you're still having problems, you need to see someone until you get some satisfaction. There are also a few people on this board who have problems related to TMJ, you might want to start a thread on that subject and see what you get back.

My first episode of BPV was in December 2002. Like I said, my GP told me there wasn't anything to do with inner ear problems but let them subside on their own, so I believed her and the spinning did stop, but it took about 6 weeks. Then, in mid-March 2003, on a trip to Seattle no less, I had this weird anxiety type rush (thought I was going to faint!) that came out of nowhere. I had also begun to have the brain fog a couple weeks before that. After that happened and freaked me out (because I didn't know it was related to inner ear) I went back to the GP. That's when she put me on the Allegra and a nasal steroid spray (totally throwing drugs at it, just stabbing in the dark). I took those for about a month (Xanax got added in there too after a couple weeks). Finally I was still feeling so weird without any reason why, and so I bailed on the GP and went straight to my ENT. He's the one who finally helped me. He ordered an MRI right away (normal) and then told me I needed to just ride it out, but if I ever had another episode of BPV, I was to come back to him for the Epley. Well, that did happen a month later (we're into the end of June now) and I went for the Epley right away and it worked -- no more spinning vertigo with certain head positions. But at the same time the second BPV hit, I got trampoline walk and that didn't go away; it was a residual effect of the BPV damage. So the first part of August I went back again, this time for an ENG to see if there was some damage that was making me have the trampoline walk, even though I wasn't spinning anymore. The ENG did show damage, so at least then I knew what was going on and that I just needed to stay active and let my brain begin the compensation process, which it had already begun to do at that point.

I basically achieved 100% around the first of the year, but I've had some family stress and then caught a cold, so I had a little setback, which has taken a couple months to crawl out of. As you read in the post about the primitive brain, you can see that the vestibular system is closely linked with the anxiety/depression center in the brain. Now, I'm basically back to 100%, but there have been a couple of instances of walking into a space and getting that light headed, my brain needs to learn this space type of feeling again. Then the anxiety kicks in a bit, and it takes me a day or two to shake it. It's frustrating to feel so close to "normal" but to have this lingering around. Anyway, sorry to be so long-winded, but that's my story.

Again, I agree with Carrie about the second opinion. Get yourself to the neurologist, or if you really suspect inner ear, a neur-otologist. They are the specialists in this area.

Terri